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Self-care management of type 1 diabetes has improved in Swedish schools according to children and adolescents
Department of Internal Medicine, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Paediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
Department of Paediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
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2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 12, 1987-1993 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Age-appropriate support for diabetes self-care is essential during school time, and we investigated the perceived quality of support children and adolescents received in 2015 and 2008.

Methods: This national study was based on questionnaires answered by children and adolescents aged 6–15 years of age with type 1 diabetes attending schools or preschools in 2008 (n = 317) and 2015 (n = 570) and separate parental questionnaires. The subjects were recruited by Swedish paediatric diabetes units, with 41/44 taking part in 2008 and 41/42 in 2015.

Results: Fewer participants said they were treated differently in school because of their diabetes in 2015 than 2008. The opportunity to perform insulin boluses and glucose monitoring in privacy increased (80% versus 88%; p < 0.05). Most (83%) adolescents aged 13–15 years were satisfied with the support they received, but levels were lower in girls (p < 0.05). More subjects had hypoglycaemia during school hours (84% versus 70%, p < 0.001), but hypoglycaemia support did not increase and was lower for adolescents than younger children (p < 0.001).

Conclusion: Children and adolescents received more support for type 1 diabetes in Swedish schools in 2015 than 2008, but more support is needed by girls and during hypoglycaemia. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017. Vol. 106, no 12, 1987-1993 p.
Keyword [en]
Hypoglycaemia, Schools, Questionnaires, Self-care, Type 1 diabetes, glucose, hemoglobin A1c, insulin, adolescent, Article, blood glucose monitoring, child, controlled study, female, food, glucose blood level, human, hypoglycemia, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, major clinical study, male, nutritional support, parent, patient attitude, priority journal, questionnaire, school, self care, sex difference, Sweden
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38353DOI: 10.1111/apa.13949ISI: 000414913500018PubMedID: 28608928Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85021820368OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-38353DiVA: diva2:1170973
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-01-05Bibliographically approved

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