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Associations between Fine Motor Performance in Activities of Daily Living and Cognitive Ability in a Nondemented Sample of Older Adults: Implications for Geriatric Physical Rehabilitation
Utah State University, Department of Family, Consumer, and Human Development, Logan, UT, United States.
Utah State University, Department of Family, Consumer, and Human Development, Logan, UT, United States.
Pennsylvania State University, PA, United States.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4149-9787
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1144-1159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Fine motor ability (FMA) is essential in certain activities of daily living (ADL) and is considered mostly as a component of physical function. We hypothesize that cognitive ability explains significant variance in ADL-related FMA, above and beyond what is explained by physical ability (grip strength).

Method: Origins of Variance in the Old Old Study (OCTO)-Twin participants (n = 218), aged 80+ (dementia, stroke, Parkinson's disease excluded) were assessed on depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale [CES-D]), a cognitive battery, grip strength, and FMA.

Results: In a series of ordinary least squares regression models, FMA was not associated with gender or depressive symptoms, but was associated with age (marginally; β = '.164, p =.051), grip strength (β = '.381, p <.01), and one cognitive measure, perceptual speed (β = '.249, p <.01).

Discussion: In nondemented older adults, cognitive speed predicts ADL-related FMA after controlling for age and physical ability. Physical rehabilitation of FMA in ADL tasks should consider the importance of cognitive ability, even in nondemented older adults. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017. Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1144-1159
Keywords [en]
cognitive ability, disablement, fine motor ability, functional ability, grip strength
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38336DOI: 10.1177/0898264316654674ISI: 000418259500002PubMedID: 27339106Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85029646866Local ID: HHJARNISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-38336DiVA, id: diva2:1170671
Available from: 2018-01-04 Created: 2018-01-04 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

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Ernsth-Bravell, Marie

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