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“Stop Blaming the Cows!”: How Livestock Production is Legitimized in Everyday Discourse on Facebook
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1011-7726
2018 (English)In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 28-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2016, Swedish climate reporting declined in quantity and shifted focus somewhat from climate change as such to the harmful climate impacts of meat consumption. The latter prompted discussions in social media – an increasingly important forum for public debate but infrequently studied in environmental communication research. Despite strong evidence that a meat and dairy based diet is devastating for the environment, meat consumption is increasing, and this qualitative study aims to – through the lens of social representation theory – contribute knowledge about how livestock production is legitimized in everyday discourse on Facebook. The article identifies representations that legitimize livestock production through polarization between (1) livestock production and other (environmental) issues, (2) environmentally “good” and “bad” countries, and (3) “reliable” and “unreliable” information. It concludes by discussing the influence of national ideology on the legitimization of livestock production and the potential of social media to counter the post-politicization of environmental issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018. Vol. 12, no 1, p. 28-43
Keywords [en]
social media, environmental communication, social representation theory, climate change, meat, lay sense-making
National Category
Media Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38263DOI: 10.1080/17524032.2017.1406385ISI: 000423594200004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85038012471OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-38263DiVA, id: diva2:1168414
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Olausson, Ulrika

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  • apa
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