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Blended voices and co-narration in lay– interprofessional talk about return-to-work
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7341-945X
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
2013 (English)In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 289-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the co-production of narratives based on an analysis of audio recordings from 12 statutory lay–interprofessional meetings involving clients and concerning rehabilitation for return-to-work. Using Bakhtin’s (1981) notion of voice in a similar vein to Mishler (1984), it is argued that a voice represents a specific normative order, displayed in the way of speaking. The premises of the approach taken is that citizens’ problems and needs are often presented as stories and that this particular type of meeting opens up the possibility for what Wertsch (1991) calls multi-voicedness. Three patterns of co-narrating the client’s story of illness and the process of rehabilitation were found. In the most frequently recurring form, there was one primary storyteller and another participant who joined in as a co-teller. Another pattern was that dyadic co-narrated episodes commonly drew on prior contacts between the two storytellers. A third salient feature was how storytelling episodes involved revoicing an absent expert – that is, the interactional move when a speaker makes use of someone else’s words, and what Bakhtin (1981) calls rhetorical double-voicedness. Due to the multi-voicedness character, co-narrated stories in lay–interprofessional meetings often represent two or more perspectives and are founded on the blending of voices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Equinox Publishing, 2013. Vol. 10, no 3, p. 289-316
Keywords [en]
cross-institutional settings; institutional discourse; long-term illness; narrative analysis; sickness benefit; social welfare; story-telling
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38164DOI: 10.1558/japl.26894Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85041175571OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-38164DiVA, id: diva2:1165783
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved

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Bülow, Pia H.Cedersund, Elisabet

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