Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Users and producers: Online News as Mediated Participation
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9539-9648
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this thesis is to illuminate principles that guide mediated participation, taking place through the interplay between users and news producers. Therefore, the study focuses both how spaces for participation are structured (by news producers) and those that exert participatory practices (news users). The research design thus has an approach that ties together analytical strands that previously have been studied separately. The research questions concern how the conditions comprising mediated participation – in terms of opportunities for users’ participatory practices – differ between (1a) various types of online news sites, and (1b) various types of news, as well as how users exercise participatory practices (2a) on various types of news sites, and (2b) in connection to various types of news. The last research question (3) concerns how users express the connection to news producers, through participatory practices within participatory spaces. The thesis includes four papers, that together answer the research questions by applying content and text analyses to various types of news sites (big city national, local rural area, morning broadsheets and evening tabloids) and its content: news articles and features for user participation, such as comments and sharing news through social media (i.e., Facebook and Twitter).

The results show that users and news producers take diverging approaches to user participation adjacent to online news. This is illustrated by the fact that the categories of news that users are most often permitted to interact with, coincide precisely with the news that users tend to decline to interact with, while the news categories that users tend to interact with (when given the chance) occur comparatively sparse. The results also show that news producers are much more prone to permit users to share news through social media, than to permit them to comment news on the news site. Almost all news are made to permit users to share news through Facebook and Twitter, whereas commenting news is substantially more restricted, and even more so among big city national news sites than among local rural area news sites. When it concerns user practices, users share news on Facebook 20 times more often than they share news through Twitter or comment news on news sites. Tweeting news almost only occurs in news sites affiliated with big city national newspapers, and most prominently so when it concerns evening tabloids. This means (when controlling for differences in circulation) that commenting as a user practice tend to have a more local character than tweeting news, with its more national focus.

The connection between users and news producers is shaped by the approach these groups of actors take to each other, under different circumstances. Sharing news through Facebook and commenting on news sites, are not interchangeable practices. Nor is tweeting news from a news site affiliated with national tabloid compared to from a local morning newspaper. And although it is well known from extant research that producers hold hesitant views concerning users’ influence over content, users also express distrust when it concerns how professional media practices allow various actors salience in the media. These ideas primarily concern “elites” versus “commoners”, differences between public service and commercial media, regulations and media, including roles, genres, and formats. These ideas also concern whether representational principles should guide media representation or if certain views should be excluded, whether journalists’ political views affect media performance, and how crime news should be presented in terms of what events are published and representations of victims and perpetrators. Overall, the thesis illustrates that there are connections between various forms of electronic communication (i.e., commenting and sharing news through Facebook and Twitter), and the specific contextual and social settings that news sites are embedded within, with its specific situated audience, shaping the connections between users and news producers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication , 2017. , 148 p.
Series
Doktorsavhandlingar från Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, ISSN 1652-7933 ; 33
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37598ISBN: 978-91-88339-10-2 (print)ISBN: 978-91-88339-11-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-37598DiVA: diva2:1149068
Public defence
2017-11-24, Hb116, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-10-13 Created: 2017-10-13 Last updated: 2017-10-13Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. ‘Let’s Get Them Involved’ . . . to Some Extent: Analyzing Online News Participation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Let’s Get Them Involved’ . . . to Some Extent: Analyzing Online News Participation
2015 (English)In: Social Media + Society, ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 1, no 2, 1-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The development of social media applications, such as blogs, Facebook, and Twitter, has offered new participatory opportunities for everyday media users. This article contributes to research by looking into one specific aspect of the increasingly more participatory media ecology—the news comment feature. Drawing on a quantitative content analysis of 1,100 news pieces, as well as spaces for user comments, the article reveals both how this emerging public space is shaped by the media company and, later, appropriated by their participating users. Our analysis reveals, for instance, that the online newspaper prefers to allow users to comment on lightweight news such as sports and entertainment. The users, however, prefer to post comments on news covering changes in proximity space, politics, and health care, while also clearly ignoring the most available news pieces (sport and entertainment). In the concluding section, the discrepancy in preferences is discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keyword
participation, user-generated content, social media, news comments, content analysis
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28675 (URN)10.1177/2056305115621934 (DOI)
Note

Forskningsfinansiär: Carl-Olof och Jenz Hamrins stiftelse

Available from: 2015-12-30 Created: 2015-12-17 Last updated: 2017-10-13Bibliographically approved
2. Commenting, sharing and tweeting news: Measuring online news participation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commenting, sharing and tweeting news: Measuring online news participation
2016 (English)In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 37, no 2, 67-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social plugins for sharing news through Facebook and Twitter have become increasingly salient features on news sites. Together with the user comment feature, social plugins are the most common way for users to contribute. The wide use of multiple features has opened new areas to comprehensively study users’ participatory practices. However, how do these opportunities to participate vary between the participatory spaces that news sites affiliated with local, national broadsheet and tabloid news constitute? How are these opportunities appropriated by users in terms of participatory practices such as commenting and sharing news through Facebook and Twitter? In addition, what differences are there between news sites in these respects? To answer these questions, a quantitative content analysis has been conducted on 3,444 articles from nine Swedish online newspapers. Local newspapers are more likely to allow users to comment on articles than are national newspapers. Tweeting news is appropriated only on news sites affiliated with evening tabloids and national morning newspapers. Sharing news through Facebook is 20 times more common than tweeting news or commenting. The majority of news items do not attract any user interaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordicom, 2016
Keyword
user-generated content, news, comments, social media, participatory journalism
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31702 (URN)10.1515/nor-2016-0018 (DOI)000393115900005 ()2-s2.0-84995600669 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
3. Participating Users across News Media Spaces
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participating Users across News Media Spaces
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Keyword
Crossmedia, participation, user-generated content, social media, news comments, content analysis, journalism; local, spatial, worldmaking
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37588 (URN)
Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2017-10-13
4. News Users’ (Dis)trust in Media Performance: Challenges to Sustainable Journalism in Times of Xenophobia
Open this publication in new window or tab >>News Users’ (Dis)trust in Media Performance: Challenges to Sustainable Journalism in Times of Xenophobia
2017 (English)In: What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, 161-179 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, the sustainability of journalism is explored with interest in how users express trust and distrust towards professional news media. The challenges to the sustainability of journalism have social, financial and environmental tenets. The center of attention here is the social aspect of how users negotiate the end of journalism in society. Users have conflicting views on how professional news media perform, oscillating between if the responsibility of news media should be extended to coverage of conflicting issues or to enable citizens to share a common ground imprinted by solidarity. These aspects merge and manifest in news related to issues of xenophobia and solidarity. The changed financial prospects of the news industry coincide with the timing of globalization’s effects on the local scene, where people experience increasing hurdles across the world. The sustainability of journalism—considered crucial for democracy—is currently under substantial pressure. At the same time, living conditions are deteriorating around the world. People need to migrate to other societies that are becoming ever more polarized between xenophobia and solidarity. News covering this process is constructed within a professional value system that—for the sustainability of journalism—needs to be perceived as legitimate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37328 (URN)10.3726/b11462 (DOI)9781433143816 (ISBN)9781433134418 (ISBN)9781433134401 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2017-10-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Omslag(107 kB)8 downloads
File information
File name COVER04.pdfFile size 107 kBChecksum SHA-512
004aa4ba318314658ffb17e766c1c6e634fd863f7167e691ac8b6f3678051d91d3e48583ee2f345a95ff4451c67c4ffc2319d053e0f55fdb3c45e71f77f83451
Type coverMimetype application/pdf
Fulltext(14720 kB)41 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 14720 kBChecksum SHA-512
105c850cf9ad922c7d928ccf6d4f04321ecf6133c54a1b3ab4075639d15dc298fd0f056becc79ba0921c71f4738403e93bdc13089919dea50e68d0ac9d4baec1
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Authority records BETA

Almgren, Susanne

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Almgren, Susanne
By organisation
HLK, Media and Communication Studies
Media and Communications

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 41 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 1504 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf