Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Factors associated with stress in families of children with autism spectrum disorder
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0756-6862
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 155-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify key factors associated with severe stress in families raising a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Methods: Questionnaires were mailed to families with one or more children with a diagnosis of ASD. Data from 543 surveys were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Forty-four percent (n = 241) of the caregivers reported severe family stress related to raising a child with ASD. Severe family stress was associated with (1) reduced ability to socialize; (2) not having accessed individual therapy; (3) negative co-parent relationships; and (4) high out of pockets costs due to the child’s ASD. The specific ASD diagnosis, comorbid conditions, socio-demographic variables, and social support were not associated with severe family stress. Conclusion: The findings of the current study highlight the importance of a systemic approach to family stress, whereby individual, family, and ecological factors are investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018. Vol. 21, no 3, p. 155-165
Keywords [en]
Ability to socialize, co-parent, cost, family systems, individual therapy, occupation
National Category
Psychology Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37577DOI: 10.1080/17518423.2017.1326185ISI: 000427274000002PubMedID: 28598245Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85020626176Local ID: HHJCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-37577DiVA, id: diva2:1147533
Available from: 2017-10-06 Created: 2017-10-06 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Vaz, SharmilaFalkmer, Torbjörn

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Vaz, SharmilaFalkmer, Torbjörn
By organisation
HHJ. CHILDHHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation
In the same journal
Developmental Neurorehabilitation
PsychologyPsychiatry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 38 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf