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Impairment in movement skills of children with autistic spectrum disorders
Guy's ad St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1129-8071
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2009 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 311-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim:

We undertook this study to explore the degree of impairment in movement skills in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and a wide IQ range.

Methods:

Movement skills were measured using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC) in a large, well defined, population-derived group of children (n = 101: 89 males, 12 females; mean age 11 y 4 mo, SD 10 mo; range 10 y-14 y 3 mo) with childhood autism and broader ASD and a wide range of IQ scores. Additionally, we tested whether a parent-completed questionnaire, the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ), was useful in identifying children who met criteria for movement impairments after assessment (n = 97 with complete M-ABCs and DCDQs).

Results:

Of the children with ASD, 79% had definite movement impairments on the M-ABC; a further 10% had borderline problems. Children with childhood autism were more impaired than children with broader ASD, and children with an IQ less than 70 were more impaired than those with IQ more than 70. This is consistent with the view that movement impairments may arise from a more severe neurological impairment that also contributes to intellectual disability and more severe autism. Movement impairment was not associated with everyday adaptive behaviour once the effect of IQ was controlled for. The DCDQ performed moderately well as a screen for possible motor difficulties.

Interretation:

Movement impairments are common in children with ASD. Systematic assessment of movement abilities should be considered a routine investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 51, no 4, p. 311-316
Keywords [en]
adaptive behavior, article, autism, child, Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire, disease severity, female, human, intellectual impairment, intelligence quotient, major clinical study, male, motor dysfunction, motor performance, Movement Assessment Battery for Children, parameters of measurement and analysis, priority journal, questionnaire, school child, Adolescent, Analysis of Variance, Autistic Disorder, Humans, Intelligence, Intelligence Tests, Motor Skills Disorders, Questionnaires, Severity of Illness Index
National Category
Neurology Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37469DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2008.03242.xISI: 000264344900012PubMedID: 19207298Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-63049127459OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-37469DiVA, id: diva2:1146091
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2017-10-02Bibliographically approved

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