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Brain Plasticity following Intensive Bimanual Therapy in Children with Hemiparesis: Preliminary Evidence
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1129-8071
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2015 (English)In: Neural Plasticity, ISSN 2090-5904, E-ISSN 1687-5443, Vol. 2015, 798481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neuroplasticity studies examining children with hemiparesis (CH) have focused predominantly on unilateral interventions. CH also have bimanual coordination impairments with bimanual interventions showing benefits. We explored neuroplasticity following hand-Arm bimanual intensive therapy (HABIT) of 60 hours in twelve CH (6 females, mean age 11 ± 3.6 y). Serial behavioral evaluations and MR imaging including diffusion tensor (DTI) and functional (fMRI) imaging were performed before, immediately after, and at 6-week follow-up. Manual skills were assessed repeatedly with the Assisting Hand Assessment, Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire, and Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function. Beta values, indicating the level of activation, and lateralization index (LI), indicating the pattern of brain activation, were computed from fMRI. White matter integrity of major fibers was assessed using DTI. 11/12 children showed improvement after intervention in at least one measure, with 8/12 improving on two or more tests. Changes were retained in 6/8 children at follow-up. Beta activation in the affected hemisphere increased at follow-up, and LI increased both after intervention and at follow-up. Correlations between LI and motor function emerged after intervention. Increased white matter integrity was detected in the corpus callosum and corticospinal tract after intervention in about half of the participants. Results provide first evidence for neuroplasticity changes following bimanual intervention in CH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2015. Vol. 2015, 798481
Keyword [en]
adolescent, Article, behavior change, child, clinical article, clinical assessment tool, corpus callosum, diffusion tensor imaging, female, follow up, functional magnetic resonance imaging, hand arm bimanual intensive therapy, hand function, hemiparesis, hemispheric dominance, human, individual behavior assessment, intensive care, male, motor performance, nerve cell plasticity, nerve fiber, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, physiotherapy, pyramidal tract, questionnaire, school child, skill, white matter, brain, hand, kinesiotherapy, paresis, pathophysiology, psychomotor performance, skeletal muscle cell, treatment outcome, Exercise Therapy, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Motor Skills, Muscle Fibers, Skeletal, Neuronal Plasticity, Pyramidal Tracts
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37449DOI: 10.1155/2015/798481ISI: 000365230400001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84948404169OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-37449DiVA: diva2:1146043
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2017-10-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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