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Therapeutic potential and ownership of commercially available consoles in children with cerebral palsy
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1129-8071
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2017 (English)In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction:

We conducted a survey amongst families of children with cerebral palsy to ascertain the ownership and therapeutic use and potential of commercial games consoles to improve motor function.

Method:

Three hundred families in South East England were identified through clinical records, and were requested to complete an anonymised questionnaire.

Results:

A total of 61 families (20% response) returned a completed questionnaire with 41 (68%) identified males and 19 (32%) identified females with cerebral palsy, with a mean age of 11 years 5 months (SD 3Y 7M). The large majority of families, 59 (97%), owned a commercial console and the child used this for 50-300 minutes a week. Returns by severity of motor impairment were: Gross Motor Function Classification System I (22%), II (32%), III (13%), IV (15%), V (18%). Consoles were used regularly for play across all Gross Motor Function Classification System categories.

Conclusion:

The potential of games consoles, as home-based virtual reality therapy, in improving the motor function of children with cerebral palsy should be appropriately tested in a randomised controlled trial. Wide ownership, and the relative ease with which children engage in the use of commercially-based virtual reality therapy systems, suggests potential as a means of augmenting therapy protocols, taking advantage of interest and participation patterns of families.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017. Vol. 80, no 2, p. 108-116
Keywords [en]
assistive technology, Cerebral palsy, commercial consoles, survey
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37442DOI: 10.1177/0308022616678635ISI: 000396943800006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85011588852Local ID: HHJCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-37442DiVA, id: diva2:1145856
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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