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Developmental characteristics of disparate bimanual movement skills in typically developing children
Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Technology Design and Environment, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
School of Psychology, University of East London, London, United Kingdom.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of motor behavior, ISSN 0022-2895, E-ISSN 1940-1027, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 8-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mastery of many tasks in daily life requires role differentiated bimanual hand use with high spatiotemporal cooperation and minimal interference. The authors investigated developmental changes in the performance of a disparate bimanual movement task requiring sequenced movements. Age groups were attributed to changes in CNS structures critical for bimanual control such as the corpus callosum (CC) and the prefrontal cortex; young children (5–6 years old), older children (7–9 years old), and adolescents (10–16 years old). Results show qualitative changes in spatiotemporal sequencing between the young and older children which typically marks a phase of distinct reduction of growth and myelination of the CC. Results show qualitative changes in spatiotemporal sequencing between the young and older children, which coincides with distinct changes in the growth rate and myelination of the CC. The results further support the hypothesis that CC maturation plays an important role in the development of bimanual skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018. Vol. 50, no 1, p. 8-16
Keywords [en]
bimanual coordination, corpus callosum, kinematics, motor development, child, coordination, growth rate, human, maturation, myelination, skill
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37439DOI: 10.1080/00222895.2016.1271302PubMedID: 28632103Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85014510095Local ID: HHJCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-37439DiVA, id: diva2:1145847
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved

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