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Why forest gardening for children? Swedish forest gardeneducators' ideas, purposes, and experiences
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3199-6755
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0117-2974
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8952-8773
2018 (English)In: The Journal of Environmental Education, ISSN 0095-8964, E-ISSN 1940-1892, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 242-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Utilizing forest gardens as urban settings for outdoor environmental education in Sweden is a new practice. These forest gardens combine qualities of a forest, e.g., multi-layered polyculture vegetation, with those of a school garden, such as accessibility and food production. The study explores both the perceived qualities of forest gardens in comparison to other outdoor settings and forest garden educators’ ideas, purposes, and experiences of activities in a three-year forest gardening project with primary school children. The data were collected through interviews and observations and analyzed qualitatively. Four reported ideas were to give children opportunities to: feel a sense of belonging to a whole; experience self-regulation and systemic dependence; experience that they can co-create with non-human organisms; and imagine possible transformation of places. Four pedagogical forest garden features are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018. Vol. 49, no 3, p. 242-259
Keywords [en]
Forest garden; outdoor environmental education; school garden; sustainability; systemic thinking
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37430DOI: 10.1080/00958964.2017.1373619ISI: 000431603400004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85030151207OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-37430DiVA, id: diva2:1145306
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved

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Almers, EllenAskerlund, PerKjellström, Sofia

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Sustainability Education Research (SER)The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and WelfareHHJ. ADULTHHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping)HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare)
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