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The maestro music teacher and musicians' mental health
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. (Lifelong learning/Encell)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5498-9649
1996 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Society tends to look upon promising and highly able musicians as fortunate individuals, yet research has shown that musicians seldom are to be envied in terms of working conditions and the longtime results of their professional commitment. A majority amongst particularly orchestral musicians suffers from a wide variety of stress and stress-related injuries--physiological as well as psychological. These injuries do not occur suddenly without a longterm build-up. They start with the somewhat paradoxical maestro phenomenon and the teacher-student relationship in a context of higher musical education.The key questions explored in this paper are: Why do musicians accept the harsh treatment of conductors? What kind of teachers do brilliant performers make? Naturalistic case studies were conducted of seven performance teachers and their students. Results indicated that, among the participants, potential stressors may be structured along four dimensions:(1) the handling and pacing of informational flow;(2) therationalized and standardized, rather than the existential and individualized understanding of music and playing;(3) the product-oriented teaching at the expense of person-oriented teaching; and (4) a superordinate stressor whichis connected to the nature of the teacher-student relationship, and which--ifoptimal--seemingly lessens the impact of other stress factors. It is thought that students may tolerate poor treatment due to their desire to be associated with a famous figure arising from a distortion of their social perceptions

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1996. p. 1-19
Keywords [en]
Mental Health; Music Education; Music Teachers; Musicians; Performance Factors; Student Attitudes; Student Motivation; Teacher Influence; Teacher-Student Relationship
National Category
Psychology Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37200OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-37200DiVA, id: diva2:1139133
Conference
American Psychological Association 104th Conference, Toronto, Canada, August 9-13, 1996.
Note

This paper has an ERIC Clearinghouse identification number: ED406636

Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2017-09-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

ED406636(322 kB)34 downloads
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf