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Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1884-5696
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8212-823X
Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore whether associations between self-reported sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness differed in older community-dwelling men and women. Design: Cross-sectional.

Methods: A community-dwelling sample of 675 older men and women (mean age 77.7 years, SD 3.8 years) was used. All participants underwent a clinical examination by a cardiologist. Validated questionnaires were used to investigate sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Subjects were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours), n = 231; normal sleepers (7-8 hours), n = 338; and long sleepers (≥9 hours), n = 61. ancovas were used to explore sex-specific effects.

Results: Depressive symptoms were associated with short sleep in men, but not in women. Fatigue was associated with both short and long sleep duration in men. No sex-specific associations of sleep duration with daytime sleepiness or anxiety were found.

Conclusion: Nurses investigating sleep duration and its correlates, or effects, in clinical practice need to take sex into account, as some associations may be sex specific. Depressive symptoms and fatigue can be used as indicators to identify older men with sleep complaints.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017.
Keyword [en]
Aged, Daytime sleepiness, Depression, Insomnia, Rural population, Sex differences, Sleep, Sleep-wake disorders
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36647DOI: 10.1111/scs.12461PubMedID: 28574585Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85020105192OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-36647DiVA: diva2:1120659
Available from: 2017-07-06 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2017-07-06

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