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Plant-based diets on social media: How content on social media influence for maintaining a lifestyle
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Plant-based food has recently been a frequently addressed topic for scientific research, mainly because of its benefits for the environmental sustainability, human health and animal welfare. Nonetheless, there is limited research on how people maintain a plant-based diet, as well as research gaps on the topic in relation to media and communication studies.

The purpose of this research is to provide new empirical data on how social media can inspire and/or influence a person to maintain a plant-based lifestyle. Using a qualitative method of in-depth interviews, the aim is to understand how content on social media motivates people to make sustainable movements in their real life. In other words, the research will provide insights on how a lifestyle can be upheld with the help of social media.

As a theoretical basis for the study, the following theories have been applied: The uses and gratification theory, cultivation analysis theory and social cognitive theory.

The findings suggest that social media is a useful tool for a person that wants to maintain a plant-based diet. Facebook, YouTube and Instagram are preferred online platforms for seeking and sharing information about the lifestyle and the most interesting contents for upholding a plant-based diet are food pictures, personal blogs and vlogs, documentaries about the environment and animal welfare, as well as product news and different discussions in virtual groups. The result also shows that people are most likely to change a behaviour after seeing content on social media that makes them emotional, in a positive or negative way. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keywords [en]
plant-based diets, qualitative in-depth interviews, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, uses and gratifications theory, cultivation analysis theory, social cognitive theory
National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35973ISRN: JU-HLK-MKA-2-20170107OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-35973DiVA, id: diva2:1107865
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Available from: 2017-06-16 Created: 2017-06-11 Last updated: 2017-06-16Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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Output format
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