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Hiring and separation rates before and after the Arab Spring in the Tunisian labor market
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Department of Economics, Sogang University, Seoul, South Korea.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7902-4683
College of Business Administration, Abu Dhabi University, United Arab Emirates.
Faculty Social Science and Humanities, The National University of Malaysia, Malaysia.
Energy Research Centre, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan.
2017 (English)In: South African Journal of Economics, ISSN 0038-2280, E-ISSN 1813-6982, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 259-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We seek to explore the hiring and separation rates in Tunisia before and after the Arab Spring based on quarterly business level data for 503 firms over the span of January 2007 to December 2012. Furthermore, we examine whether employers are willing to dismiss older workers to trigger an effective increase in mobility that will open new opportunities for the youth community. We build our analysis upon six main empirical models to study employment decisions reflected by major indicators such as the number of hiring, number of separations, total employment effects, male-female ratio, age cohorts, labour mobility and net employment. The results show that the Arab Spring has created structural unemployment trends. In addition, we note that the 2008 global turmoil has fostered the firing level of employment. Our conclusions also indicate that the response of Tunisia's government to high unemployment rates caused by the financial meltdown in 2008 and the events in 2011 was not sufficient to remove the attached lingering effects that still distress the country's labour market. In addition, our findings emphasize the significant challenges faced by Tunisian youth that could be mitigated by efficient policy actions to incentivize training and development geared towards the private sector.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017. Vol. 85, no 2, p. 259-278
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35765DOI: 10.1111/saje.12157ISI: 000402833800006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85019569204Local ID: IHHÖvrigtISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-35765DiVA, id: diva2:1105306
Available from: 2017-06-02 Created: 2017-06-02 Last updated: 2018-01-05Bibliographically approved

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Heshmati, Almas

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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