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Inter-organizational simulation as a training opportunity for maritime search and rescue (SAR) missions
German Maritime Search and Rescue Service, Germany.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8304-5321
Technische Universität Chemnitz, Germany.
2016 (English)In: Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE 2016) and the Affiliated Conferences / [ed] Tareq Ahram, Waldemar Karwowski, Springer, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Maritime disasters are extremely rare in the western world. However, when they do occur, there are often no second chances. As a result, the responsible maritime authorities, organizations with rescue units, and passing vessels who assist spontaneously must cooperate harmoniously to increase the probability of success. In order to be well prepared for in emergency situations, organizations must learn to work together, while SAR personnel must gain extensive experience. Because such situations are so rare, this is best done through extensive practice and realistic exercises. Unfortunately, effective training opportunities concerning complex maritime incidents are very limited, mainly due to their high costs, potential risks to participants in live SAR exercises, and a limited number of participating SAR personnel. As a result, there is a general need for additional training and exercises for seagoing authorities. The joint R&D project “Maritime Simulators Network” (MAR-SimNET) aims to provide such training. Most restrictions of live SAR exercises can be solved by using simulations. Due to its wide-spread acceptance as a training tool for shipping and seagoing organizations, ship handling simulation represents a valuable starting point for developing such training programs. To date, the main purpose of ship handling simulation in the training of nautical personnel is to obtain more experience in difficult navigational situations. More recently, bridge resource management and the training of soft skills have become additional topics in simulator-based training of navigating officers. An additional type of simulator that is used for the development of effective SAR simulation training programs is the communications simulator. This type of simulator is often used in relation to global maritime distress and safety systems (GMDSS) devices. Previously, it was uncommon to combine ship handling and GMDSS simulation. However, we viewed this as the first step in creating a simulator for SAR purposes. Real SAR missions do not just involve ships – according to international regulations (IAMSAR), the responsible Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) and the coastal radio stations are also important maritime SAR units. Unfortunately, MRCC simulators had not yet been developed – a problem we have also addressed with this project. The last important players in SAR missions are helicopters, which may help provide quick transportation of necessary rescue equipment and assistance to both accident victims and other assisting units on-scene as well as act as a search unit. The aim of the MAR-SimNET project was to develop a SAR mission simulator that is able to provide interorganizational training for all potentially involved authorities and organizations – i.e., bridge crews from different vessels, helicopter crews, MRCC personnel – as well as a simulated workplace for operators of coastal counties’ public-safety response teams – e. g. fire departments. In our paper, we will explain how the different stakeholder demands were transferred into an integrated interlinked SAR simulator infrastructure to implement a comprehensive human factors training for maritime disaster management and beyond.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35544ISBN: 978-3-319-43764-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-35544DiVA: diva2:1096194
Conference
7th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE), Orlando, July 27-31, 2016.
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2017-05-17Bibliographically approved

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Steigenberger, Norbert

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