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Factors related to successful transition planning for adolescents on the autism spectrum
School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
Occupational Therapy Program, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0756-6862
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7275-3472
2018 (English)In: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adolescents on the autism spectrum often have difficulties with the transition from high school to post-school activities. Despite this, little is known about the transition planning processes for this group. This study explored predisposing, reinforcing and enabling factors related to the transition planning processes for adolescents on the autism spectrum in Australia. The PRECEDE model guided a needs assessment, in which descriptive data about transition planning processes were collected via an online questionnaire from adolescents on the autism spectrum, their parents and professionals (N = 162). Predisposing factors included: an individualised and strengths-focused approach, and adolescent motivation, anxiety and insight. Reinforcing factors included: support and guidance, skill development and real-life experiences. Enabling factors were: having a clear plan with a coordinated approach, scheduled meetings and clear formal documentation. Whilst some factors aligned with recommendations for transition planning for adolescents with disabilities in general, there were some autism-specific factors. For example: anxiety, motivation and insight were important predisposing factors, and providing choice and flexibility was an enabling factor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018. Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-14
Keywords [en]
Asperger syndrome, Child development disorder, Pervasive developmental disorder, Employment, Vocational education, College, University, Career planning and development
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35391DOI: 10.1111/1471-3802.12388ISI: 000419513000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85040172767Local ID: HHJCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-35391DiVA, id: diva2:1089608
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved

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Falkmer, TorbjörnFalkmer, Marita

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Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)Occupational Therapy

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