Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Theory of Planned Behavior including self-stigma and perceived barriers explain help-seeking behavior for sexual problems in Iranian women suffering from epilepsy
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
Health and Rehabilitation Research Institute, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
2017 (English)In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 68, 123-128 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose To apply the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the two additional concepts self-stigma and perceived barriers to the help-seeking behavior for sexual problems in women with epilepsy.

Methods In this 18-month follow-up study, TPB elements, including attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and behavioral intention along with self-stigma and perceived barriers in seeking help for sexual problems were assessed in n = 818 women with epilepsy (94.0% aged ≤ 40 years). The basic TPB model (model 1) and the TPB model additionally including self-stigma and perceived barriers (Model 2) were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Results Both SEM models showed satisfactory model fits. According to model, attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention explained 63.1% of the variance in help-seeking behavior. Variance was slightly higher (64.5%) when including self-stigma and perceived barriers (model 2). In addition, the fit indices of the models were better highlighting the importance of self-stigma and perceived barriers in help-seeking behavior for sexual problems.

Conclusion Theory of Planned Behavior is useful in explaining help-seeking behavior for sexual problems in women with epilepsy. Self-stigma and perceived barriers are additional factors that should be considered in future interventions aiming to adopt TPB to improve help-seeking behavior for sexual problems. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 68, 123-128 p.
Keyword [en]
Epilepsy, Help-seeking behavior, Self-stigma, Structural equation modeling, Theory of Planned Behavior
National Category
Nursing Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35124DOI: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2017.01.010PubMedID: 28161676ScopusID: 2-s2.0-85012247313Local ID: HHJövrigtISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-35124DiVA: diva2:1077427
Available from: 2017-02-27 Created: 2017-02-27 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Pakpour, Amir H.
By organisation
HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science
In the same journal
Epilepsy & Behavior
NursingNeurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 22 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf