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Industrial robotics in the lean enterprise – a case study
Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4308-2678
2008 (English)In: Advances in Manufacturing Technology - XXII: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Manufacturing Research, 9-11 September, 2008, 2008, 171-180 p.Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The  globalization  and  the  increasing  challenge  from  low-wage  competitors  highlight the need for European industries to enhance their ability to develop and manufacture products  competitively.  Meeting  customer  demands  requires  a  high  degree  of flexibility,  low-cost/low-volume  manufacturing  skills  and  an  ability  to  offer  short delivery times. In order to stay competitive, many manufacturing industries are trying to  implement  the  unique management  principles  and  practices  of  the Toyota Motor Corporation’s with many different names as e.g. “The Toyota Production System” or “Lean  production”.  One  question  and  debate  within  industry,  during  the transformation  towards  lean manufacturing  is whether  traditional robot automation fits  the principles and practices of  lean? This paper resents a case  study which has investigated  if  industrial  robot automation has a place  in a manufacturing  company pursuing the lean philosophy. The case study is based on one manufacturing company in  Sweden  that  is  currently  implementing  a  transformation  towards  a  lean-based production  system. The  case  study was performed  using  interviews  at  the  company, observation at the manufacturing plant, and workshops together with key-employees at the company. The results from the case study show that there is a need to align the company’s  present  robotic  equipment  and  machinery  towards  lean  principles.  The lean transformation within the company  is based on increased availability, controlled buffers, a more open  layout, and flow-based manufacturing with reduced batch sizes which all effect the equipment and machinery. In order for the robot automation to fit lean  principles  and  practices  there  is  a  need  for  development  of  robotized working cells  with  increased  availability,  reduced  set-up  times  by  improving  the  ability  for easily  reconfiguration,  and  improved  information  design  to  clearly  present  visual information and options to the operators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. 171-180 p.
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34501OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-34501DiVA: diva2:1060277
Conference
The Sixth International Conference on Manufacturing Research
Projects
xpres
Funder
XPRES - Initiative for excellence in production research
Available from: 2008-11-10 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2016-12-28Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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