Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sublingual administration of atropine eyedrops in children with excessive drooling - a pilot study
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Department of Dentofacial Orthopedics, Maxillofacial Unit, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Habilitation Centre, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 27, no 1, 22-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Drooling can be a severe disability and have high impact on daily life. Reversible treatment is preferable.

AIM: To analyse whether sublingual administration of atropine eyedrops is a useful reversible treatment option for severe drooling in children with disabilities.

DESIGN: The study had a prospective, single-system research design. The participants served as their own controls. The study period was 3 weeks without treatment, 4 weeks with atropine eyedrop solution 10 mg/mL one drop a day followed by 4 weeks of one drop twice a day. Parents' rating of their child's drooling was assessed on a 100-mm VAS, and unstimulated salivary secretion rate measurement was performed together with notations about side effects and practicality.

RESULTS: Parents' VAS assessment of drooling decreased from a median (range) of 74 (40-98) at baseline to 48 (18-88) (P = 0.05) and 32 (12-85) (P = 0.004) after 4 weeks of atropine once a day and another 4 weeks of atropine twice a day, respectively (n = 11). Unstimulated salivary secretion rates decreased from baseline to end of study (P = 0.032). Several parents complained about difficult administration. No irreversible side effects were noted.

CONCLUSIONS: Sublingual atropine eyedrops may be an alternative for treatment of severe drooling in children with disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017. Vol. 27, no 1, 22-29 p.
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34166DOI: 10.1111/ipd.12219ISI: 000389925200005PubMedID: 26708211Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84952909969OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-34166DiVA: diva2:1051958
Funder
Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)Region Östergötland
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-02-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Fulltext(305 kB)11 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 305 kBChecksum SHA-512
89763fa2943298a4a38c34f47a34cdd7b59ddc63f341d4637aa09f42882c2878435db39c175b1fdaffdf5769d9d7a5ea992f0a6f74770ce444fcd7f84a915b7c
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Norderyd, Johanna
By organisation
HHJ. CHILD
In the same journal
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry
Dentistry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 22 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 101 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf