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The awareness of primary caregivers in South Africa of the human rights of their children with intellectual disabilities
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4599-155X
University of Pretoria, South Africa.
University of Pretoria, South Africa.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2827-9325
2016 (English)In: Child: Care, Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, Vol. 42, no 6, 863-870 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Besides the right to freedom, human rights can be seen as a basic requirement also for the maintenance of human dignity and the opportunity to thrive – particularly in the case of children with disabilities. It is imperative to explore primary caregivers' awareness of the human rights of their children with intellectual disabilities in view of the role they may play in either facilitating or restricting these rights. This paper explores the awareness of 219 primary caregivers of the human rights of their children with intellectual disabilities.

Method

A descriptive survey design was used with a custom-designed questionnaire that employed a deductive content analysis based on the articles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of a Child. Comparisons were drawn between the awareness of primary caregivers from urban and those from rural areas.

Results

The majority (85.5%) of participants agreed that their child with intellectual disability had rights. Three broad kinds of right were mentioned (in descending order): provision rights, protection rights and participation rights. Participants from both urban and rural areas mentioned education (a provision right) most frequently. However, participants from urban areas were more aware of the different rights that existed than were their counterparts from rural areas.

Conclusion

Primary caregivers in both rural and urban areas are aware of the rights of their children with disabilities, although there are significant differences between them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 42, no 6, 863-870 p.
Keyword [en]
Children's rights, disability, parent perceptions, participation rights, protection rights, provision rights
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34137DOI: 10.1111/cch.12358PubMedID: 27357624ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84978405453Local ID: HHJCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-34137DiVA: diva2:1050977
Available from: 2016-11-30 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2016-11-30Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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More styles
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