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Globalisation and corruption - Learning how to become less corrupt
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

When countries do business with each other, be it through trade or investments, they expose themselves to foreign culture, behaviour and values (cultural traits). Previous research has shown that exposure to foreign cultures entails possible transmission of cultural traits. This paper demonstrates that when countries interact, domestic corruption may be influenced by the level of corruption in a foreign country. The empirical assessment of a panel of countries produces evidence that there indeed exists transmission of corruption between countries that interact. However, this transmission seems to be one directional going from rich to poor countries.

Keyword [en]
Globalisation, Corruption, Cultural Transmission and Trade
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31971OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-31971DiVA: diva2:1034655
Available from: 2016-10-12 Created: 2016-10-12 Last updated: 2016-10-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Causes of corruption
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Causes of corruption
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis consists of an introductory chapter and four essays. Although possible to read individually they all analyse the causes of corruption and hence complement each other.

The four essays collectively illustrate the complex nature of corruption. Often many interrelated factors work together in causing corruption. Hence, discovering how these factors, individually and together, cause corruption is vital in combating corruption.

The first essay helps to explain the path dependency of corruption. It shows that even if the legal system and enforcement level in a corrupt country or organisation is altered to become identical to that in a non corrupt, the level of corruption may not converge.

The second essay analyses how the decision making structure influences corruption. It is found that even though the profits of corruption may be monotonically related to changes in the organisational structure the incidence of corruption is not necessarily so.

The third essay looks on how corruption may spread between different organisations or countries as they interact with each other, with corrupt/non corrupt behaviour being more likely to be transmitted from successful to nonsuccessful entities than vice versa.

The fourth and final essay investigates how the freedom of information can impact on corruption. Looking on both regulatory and technical constraints on information flows, the conclusion is that relaxation of both constraints simultaneously is needed to combat corruption.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, 2009. 138 p.
Series
JIBS Dissertation Series, ISSN 1403-0470 ; 059
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31974 (URN)978-91-86345-02-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-10-12 Created: 2016-10-12 Last updated: 2016-10-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf