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Intellectually Gifted Individuals' Career Choices and Work Satisfaction: A descriptive study
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. (School Based Research and Development)
2009 (English)In: Gifted and Talented International, ISSN 1533-2276, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 11-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study set out to investigate which career path a group of intellectually gifted individuals chose, if any. How did they actually like their work, and what were the reasons for satisfaction or dissatisfaction with their chosen career? In all, 287 Mensa members (216 men and 71 women) constituted the research group. Their average age was 34.4 years (SD = 8.8) and all had obtained IQ scores equal to or higher than the 98th percentile. The study was designed as a survey operationalized as an Internet-based questionnaire using the SPSS Dimensions software. A shortened version of the Work and Life Attitudes Survey (Warr, Cook & Wall, 1979) was included as part of the questionnaire. Quantitative data were analyzed as dispersions within the research group whereas qualitative data were content-analyzed using the so-called VSAIEEDC Model. Results show that participants tended to pursue careers mainly in Technology, Science and Social Work and to a lesser degree in Practical and Aesthetic work. Work satisfaction for all these fields was shown to be average. However, for individuals choosing to start their own company and, or assume leading managerial positions, satisfaction with work and career is very high. This article focuses on possible reasons for differences between subgroups in the sample and discusses a possible way forward to improve work satisfaction for intellectually gifted individuals at work, where needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Winnipeg, Canada: World Council for Gifted and Talented Children (WCGTC) , 2009. Vol. 24, no 1, p. 11-25
Keywords [en]
Giftedness, Social Fit, Human Resource Management, Mismanagement, Intellectual Capital.
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-11050OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-11050DiVA, id: diva2:281434
Available from: 2009-12-28 Created: 2009-12-16 Last updated: 2013-12-17Bibliographically approved

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Persson, Roland S

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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Output format
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