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Adapted, Adopted, and Novel Interventions: A Whole-Population Meta-Analytic Replication of Intervention Effects
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7351-9140
School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Medical Management Center, LIME, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Medical Management Center, LIME, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Unit for Implementation and Evaluation, Center for Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Region Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
Medical Management Center, LIME, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Mental Health and Suicide, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
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2023 (English)In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Sustainable development
00. Sustainable Development, 3. Good health and well-being
Abstract [en]

Background

A challenge to implementation is management of the adaptation-fidelity dilemma or the balance between adopting an intervention with fidelity while assuring fit when transferred between contexts. A prior meta-analysis found that adapted interventions produce larger effects than novel and adopted interventions. This study attempts to replicate and expand previous findings.

Methods

Meta-analysis was used to compare effects across a whole-population of Swedish outcome studies. Main and subcategories are explored.

Results

The 523 studies included adapted (22%), adopted (33%), and novel (45%) interventions. The largest effect was found for adapted followed by novel and adopted interventions. Interventions in the mental health setting showed the highest effects, followed by somatic healthcare and social services.

Conclusions

These results replicate and expand earlier findings. Results were stable across settings with the exception of social services. Consistent with a growing body of evidence results suggest that context is important when transferring interventions across settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023.
Keywords [en]
Fidelity, cultural adaptation, prevention, efficacy, effectiveness, evidence-based
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63010DOI: 10.1177/10497315231218646ISI: 001168779500001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85178891104Local ID: HOA;;63010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-63010DiVA, id: diva2:1817859
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01737; 2018-01315Swedish Research Council, 2016-01261Available from: 2023-12-07 Created: 2023-12-07 Last updated: 2024-03-08

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Olsson, Tina M.

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