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The right to lifelong learning: Addressing policy challenges for late-life learning in Canada
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Population Studies, ISSN 2424-8150, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

Lifelong learning is essential to support optimum development, cope with life challenges, improve healthy autonomy and contribute to a just, sustainable, and prosperous society. The value of the legal right to lifelong learning is not well understood, tested, or applied, as lifelong learning is rarely extended to all people till the end of life. Education or learning was formally accepted as a human right under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948. Together with UNESCO Recommendation against Discrimination in Education (1960), these two international agreements ensure access, relevance, and equity of lifelong learning. Possible reasons for low compliance and slow implementation of lifelong learning to the end of life are discussed. Canada’s efforts can serve as a model for lifelong learning policies for later life because, as a federated country, it requires national and provincial laws to work together to achieve the same desired outcome for lifelong learning across thirteen different provinces and territories. Furthermore, for the first time, the 2021 Canadian census provided detailed data for the population aged 65–100 years, and it supports evidence-based policy development regarding for whom, when, what, when, where, and how lifelong learning outcomes can be provided nationally. A  combination of need and capacity is a better measure than determining eligibility by age 65–100 years, and the quality of learning should be based on responsiveness to specific needs and its relevance to learners in the last four decades of life. The needs for knowledge range from life management, personal growth, societal contributions, and legacy for the future. Learning options should be continuous, encourage individual choice, and rely on geragogy. To be equitable, learning in later life should be delivered in formal, nonformal, or informal means in residential and institutional settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AccScience Publishing , 2023. Vol. 9, no 2, article id 339
Keywords [en]
Late-life learning, Human rights, Disaggregated data, National policy
National Category
Learning Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-61056DOI: 10.36922/ijps.339Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85162059951Local ID: GOA;;61056OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-61056DiVA, id: diva2:1766479
Note

This article belongs to the Special Issue: Active Ageing and Educational Gerontology.

Available from: 2023-06-13 Created: 2023-06-13 Last updated: 2023-08-14Bibliographically approved

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Brink, Satya

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