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Subpopulations in Strains of Staphylococcus aureus Provide Antibiotic Tolerance
Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, 5000, SA, Australia.
Department of Health and Genomics, Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, FISABIO Institute, Valencia, 46020, Spain.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Department of Health and Genomics, Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, FISABIO Institute, Valencia, 46020, Spain.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9127-3877
Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, 5000, SA, Australia.
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2023 (English)In: Antibiotics, ISSN 0066-4774, E-ISSN 2079-6382, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 406Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to colonise different niches across the human body is linked to an adaptable metabolic capability, as well as its ability to persist within specific tissues despite adverse conditions. In many cases, as S. aureus proliferates within an anatomical niche, there is an associated pathology. The immune response, together with medical interventions such as antibiotics, often removes the S. aureus cells that are causing this disease. However, a common issue in S. aureus infections is a relapse of disease. Within infected tissue, S. aureus exists as a population of cells, and it adopts a diversity of cell types. In evolutionary biology, the concept of “bet-hedging” has established that even in positive conditions, there are members that arise within a population that would be present as non-beneficial, but if those conditions change, these traits could allow survival. For S. aureus, some of these cells within an infection have a reduced fitness, are not rapidly proliferating or are the cause of an active host response and disease, but these do remain even after the disease seems to have been cleared. This is true for persistence against immune responses but also as a continual presence in spite of antibiotic treatment. We propose that the constant arousal of suboptimal populations at any timepoint is a key strategy for S. aureus long-term infection and survival. Thus, understanding the molecular basis for this feature could be instrumental to combat persistent infections.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI , 2023. Vol. 12, no 2, article id 406
Keywords [en]
persister cells, small colony variant (SCV), Staphylococcus aureus
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59957DOI: 10.3390/antibiotics12020406ISI: 000938264600001PubMedID: 36830316Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85148852663Local ID: GOA;intsam;864056OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-59957DiVA, id: diva2:1741577
Available from: 2023-03-06 Created: 2023-03-06 Last updated: 2023-03-21Bibliographically approved

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