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Three caregiver profiles: who are they, what do they do, and who are their co-carers?
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9702-2043
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0877-4759
2023 (English)In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 466-479Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, a country with one of the highest public spending on long term care, there is also extensive informal care, i.e. unpaid care by family, friends, or neighbours. In this article, we explore the spectrum of informal caring using data from a nationally representative survey of caregivers in the Swedish population. We describe three different caregiver profiles and analyse them in relation to their panorama of care, i.e. the extent to which caring is shared with other formal- and informal co-carers. The first profile, the co-habitant family carer, consists of caregivers providing help for someone in the same household with special care needs, and were mostly alone in intensive caregiving. The second profile, persons in the care network, consists of caregivers providing help to someone with care needs in another household. They have a network of both informal and formal co-carers. Finally, the helpful fellowman consists of caregivers providing help for someone without special needs in another household. In developing relevant carer support, it is important to acknowledge that caregivers are not a homogenous group. Thus, to fulfil national ambitions to support carers across the board, policy and practice need to have a diverse group of carers in mind.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023. Vol. 26, no 3, p. 466-479
Keywords [en]
Carer typologies, carer survey, informal care, panorama of care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-55502DOI: 10.1080/13691457.2021.2016647ISI: 000733993000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85121792628Local ID: HOA;;1626388OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-55502DiVA, id: diva2:1626388
Available from: 2022-01-11 Created: 2022-01-11 Last updated: 2023-06-30Bibliographically approved

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Jegermalm, MagnusTorgé, Cristina Joy

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