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The secrets of Jönköping: Why do most 80-year-olds have more than 20 remaining teeth, and why are there very few edentulous?
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1125-9662
The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
2018 (English)In: Translational oral health research / [ed] J. H. Meurman, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 143-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Repeated epidemiological studies have been performed in the city of Jonkoping, Sweden, every 10 years since 1973. The studies were initiated in order to describe the changes in oral health in the population. Basic preventive dental care and supplementary programs were extensively performed in the population, especially among children and adolescents. In this population, the percentage of individuals with sound teeth (no caries or restorations) continuously increased each decade. The main finding regarding periodontitis is the significant increase in individuals having no or minimal periodontitis experience. In 2013, 20-60-year-olds had nearly complete dentitions (28 teeth), and the individuals in age groups 70 and 80 years had a mean number of teeth of 23 and 21, respectively. Edentulous individuals having complete dentures in the age groups 40-70 years decreased from approximately every sixth individual in 1973 to none in 2013. The continuous improvement in oral health and the reduced need for restorative treatment will have an impact on dental health-care and dental delivery systems in the near future. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018. p. 143-149
Keywords [en]
Epidemiology, Oral health, Caries, Periodontitis, Number of teeth, Preventive programs
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-53264DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-78205-8_11Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85075851167ISBN: 978-3-319-78204-1 (print)ISBN: 978-3-030-08641-1 (print)ISBN: 978-3-319-78205-8 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-53264DiVA, id: diva2:1570095
Available from: 2021-06-21 Created: 2021-06-21 Last updated: 2021-06-21Bibliographically approved

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