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‘At the End of the Day, It’s Love’: An Exploration of Relationships in Neurodiverse Couples
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work, and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Kent St, GPO Box U1987, Bentley, WA 6845, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work, and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Kent St, GPO Box U1987, Bentley, WA 6845, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work, and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Kent St, GPO Box U1987, Bentley, WA 6845, Australia.
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work, and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Bentley, WA, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living With Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7275-3472
2021 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 51, p. 3311-3321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most autistic people report challenges in initiating and developing intimate, long-term relationships. We used a phenomenological approach to interview thirteen people who were in a neurodiverse intimate relationship (where one partner had a diagnosis of autism) in order to explore the challenges and facilitators both neurotypical and autistic partners experienced. Analysis revealed that ND relationships progressed along similar pathways as non-ND relationships. Facilitators included the strength-based roles that each partner took on and the genuine support and care for each other. Challenges were reported in communication, difficulties reading and interpreting emotions, and idiosyncratic characteristics of the autistic partner. Strategies that both partners used to cope with these challenges and their perspectives of relationship-support services are also presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021. Vol. 51, p. 3311-3321
Keywords [en]
Autism, Intimate relationships, Neurotypical, Partners, Relationships, Support services
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-51112DOI: 10.1007/s10803-020-04790-zISI: 000591123100002PubMedID: 33216278Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85096379762Local ID: ;intsam;1505984OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-51112DiVA, id: diva2:1505984
Available from: 2020-12-02 Created: 2020-12-02 Last updated: 2021-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Falkmer, Marita

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