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Practices and perceptions of nurses regarding child visitation and child life role in adult intensive care units practices and perceptions of nurses regarding child visitation and child life role in adult intensive care units
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, United States.
Cardiac Center, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA, United States.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, United States.
2020 (English)In: American Journal of Critical Care, ISSN 1062-3264, E-ISSN 1937-710X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 195-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Provision of developmentally appropriate support for child visitors in adult intensive care units (ICUs) would benefit patients and young visitors. Research on best practices for child visitation in adult ICUs is limited.

Objectives

To explore the perceptions and practices of nurses working in adult ICUs in the United States regarding child visitation and the role of child life specialists in this setting.

Methods

Data were collected from 446 adult ICU nurses via a cross-sectional survey. The survey explored perceptions and practices regarding child visitation, access to child-friendly resources, and the feasibility of having a child life specialist in adult ICUs.

Results

Several participants (303, 67.9%) felt that children were at risk for psychological trauma from visiting an adult ICU. Some participants (122, 27.4%) reported that their ICUs did not have policies for child visitation. Logistic regression showed that nurses with a master’s degree were 1.8 times (P < .05) more likely to believe that young children (0-5 years) should visit. Nurses (105 of 197, 53.3%) were more likely to allow young children to visit if the patient was the child’s parent or if the patient was dying. Child-friendly resources were not routinely available. Nurses expressed that adult ICUs could benefit from child life specialists facilitating child visitation.

Conclusions

Nurses were inconsistently open to child visitation. Exceptions for older children (> 6 years), children whose parent was the patient, patients’ illness severity, and end of life allowed more child visitation. Ways to facilitate child-friendly visitation in adult ICUs are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses , 2020. Vol. 29, no 3, p. 195-203
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47185DOI: 10.4037/ajcc2020370ISI: 000569375600012PubMedID: 32355965Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85084909313Local ID: ;HHJCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-47185DiVA, id: diva2:1381056
Available from: 2019-12-20 Created: 2019-12-20 Last updated: 2020-12-18Bibliographically approved

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Knutsson, Susanne

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