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Can Microprocessor-Controlled Prosthetic Knees Reduce Attentional Demand during Singleand Dual-task Walking?
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8994-8786
Advanced Reconstruction of Extremities, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0220-6278
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND

Walking with a lower-limb prosthesis while performing a secondary task (dual-tasking) has been suggested to increase demand on attentional resources, negatively affecting balance and gait performance.[1, 2] Brain imaging research has suggested that microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees (MPKs) reduce attentional demands during single-task walking.[3] To date the effects of MPK on brain activity during dual-task walking has not been investigated.

AIM

To evaluate effects of single- and dual-task walking on cortical brain activity in individuals using a non-MPK or MPK and controls and compare differences between the 3 groups.

METHOD

A cross-sectional study was performed involving twenty-nine individuals with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation who were provided with either a non-MPK or an MPK, and 16 controls. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy was used to evaluate cortical brain activity (oxygenated haemoglobin (oxyHb) concentration level changes) while participants walked on a stable level surface and simultanously performed 2 dual-task activities; 1) walking while sorting through keys; and, 2) walking in sequence around randomly number cones. Temporospatial variables was recorded for each activity.

RESULTS

Increased brain activity (oxyHb concentration level changes) were observed when a secondary task was added in the MPK-group (p=.000) and in the control group (p=.007). No significant differences were observed between single- and dual-task walking in the non-MPK group (p>.05). Significantly increased brain activity (oxyHb concentrations level changes) was observed during single-task walking in the non-MPK group when compared to the MPK-group and controls. Significantly different results in temporospatial parameters were also observed.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION

Results suggest that dual-task walking increases cognitive demand in individuals fitted with MPKs and controls. The lack of difference with the non-MPK group may suggests that their maximum capacity was already reached during single-task walking.

REFERENCES

[1] Morgan, Prosthet Orthot Int 2016. [2] Nagamatsu, Psychol Aging 2011. [3] Möller, Prosthet Orthot Int 2018.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Thanks to Jette Schack, Evin Güler, Vera Kooiman, Lamija Pasalic, Promobilia Foundation, ALF/LUA Research Grants, Össur and Team Olmed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46966OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-46966DiVA, id: diva2:1375154
Conference
ISPO’s 17th World Congress (International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics), 5-8 October 2019, Kobe, Japan
Available from: 2019-12-04 Created: 2019-12-04 Last updated: 2019-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Möller, SaffranRamstrand, NerrolynRusaw, David

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