Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Visual search strategies in a shared zone in pedestrians with and without intellectual disability
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0756-6862
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 94, article id 103493Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People with intellectual disability (ID) may find shared zones troublesome to negotiate because of the lack of the traditional clearly defined rules and boundaries. With the built environment identified as a barrier to active travel and community access, it is vital to explore how pedestrians with ID navigate shared zones to ensure that this group is not placed in harm's way or discouraged from active travel because of the implications of shared zones. This study investigated the visual strategies of 19 adults with ID and 21 controls who wore head mounted eye trackers in a Shared Zone and at a zebra crossing (as a contrast traffic environment). In total 4750 valid fixations were analysed. Participants with ID fixated on traffic relevant objects at a rate of 68 percent of the control participants. Furthermore, the males with ID were 9(4.4–18.7) times more likely to fixate on non-traffic relevant objects compared with traffic relevant objects, much higher odds than that of females with ID 1.8(0.4–1.7). Zebra crossings appeared to act as a cue, drawing pedestrians' visual attention to the traffic environment, with both groups more likely to look at traffic relevant objects on/at the zebra crossing (66%: 34%). Future implementation of shared zones needs to be carefully considered in relation to the safety of road users with ID and their capacity to identify and assess salient environmental information.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 94, article id 103493
Keywords [en]
Eye tracking, Intellectual disability, Shared zones, Traffic safety
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46561DOI: 10.1016/j.ridd.2019.103493ISI: 000489355500012PubMedID: 31563028Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85072586881Local ID: ;HHJCHILDIS;HLKCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-46561DiVA, id: diva2:1361011
Available from: 2019-10-15 Created: 2019-10-15 Last updated: 2019-10-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Falkmer, TorbjörnFalkmer, Marita

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Falkmer, TorbjörnFalkmer, Marita
By organisation
HHJ. CHILDHLK, CHILD
In the same journal
Research in Developmental Disabilities
Applied Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 23 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf