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Disembedding performance and eye gaze behavior of adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0756-6862
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2019 (English)In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 66, article id 101417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Atypical visual perception in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) may contribute to superiority in disembedding tasks. Gaze behavior has provided some insights in to mechanisms underlying this purported superiority in children, however evidence is limited and requires additional investigation.

Method: The performance and gaze behavior of 27 adolescents with ASD and 27 matched typically developing (TD) peers were examined during the Figure Ground Subtest of the Test of Visual Perception Skills-third edition (TVPS-3).

Results: Compared to their TD counterparts, adolescents with ASD were no different in accuracy, however, had a longer response time. Differences in gaze behavior were also observed, characterized by adolescents with ASD spending less time viewing the incorrect and target figures, and spending a greater proportion of time viewing irrelevant areas of the stimuli compared to TD adolescents.

Conclusions: Results suggest that while altered visual perception was observed, this did not contribute to superiority in disembedding tasks in adolescents with ASD. Future research is required to elucidate conditions under which altered visual perception may contribute to behavioral superiority. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 66, article id 101417
Keywords [en]
Enhanced perceptual functioning, Eye tracking, Local bias, Weak central coherence
National Category
Pediatrics Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45475DOI: 10.1016/j.rasd.2019.101417ISI: 000480668200008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85068396586Local ID: ;HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-45475DiVA, id: diva2:1341050
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved

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Falkmer, TorbjörnFalkmer, Marita

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