Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
How sustainable is the sharing economy? On the sustainability connotations of sharing economy platforms
Örebro University, School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2874-017x
Örebro University, School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8625-8744
2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 206, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The sharing economy has evolved and spread to various sectors of the economy. Its early idea linked to the creation of more sustainable uses of resources. Since then, the development of the sharing economy has included a professionalization with self-employed suppliers rather than peers, and the question is whether the platforms following this development maintain the focus on sustainability. This paper describes and classifies the sustainability connotation of sharing economy platforms. It analyses 121 platforms derived through social media analytics to figure out whether they describe themselves as sustainable. The findings suggest that the sustainability connotation closely connects to specific sectors such as fashion, on-demand services and logistics. Meanwhile, the dominant role model platforms do not communicate about being sustainable. These findings contribute to previous research through (1) giving a systematic empirical account on the way various sharing economy platforms describe themselves in terms of sustainability, (2) pointing out the differences among the platforms, and (3) indicating the diversity in sustainability connotation among various sectors of the economy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 206, p. 419-429
Keywords [en]
Platform, Sharing economy, Social media analytics, Sustainability, Social networking (online), On-demand services, Role model, Sustainable use, Sustainable development
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41901DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.09.196ISI: 000449449100036Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85054876983OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-41901DiVA, id: diva2:1258876
Available from: 2018-10-26 Created: 2018-10-26 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Laurell, ChristoferSandström, Christian

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Laurell, ChristoferSandström, Christian
By organisation
JIBS, Business AdministrationJIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC)
In the same journal
Journal of Cleaner Production
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 2492 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf