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Viewpoints of pedestrians with and without cognitive impairment on shared zones and zebra crossings
Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia and Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Linköping, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0756-6862
Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e0203765Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Shared zones are characterised by an absence of traditional markers that segregate the road and footpath. Negotiation of a shared zone relies on an individual’s ability to perceive, assess and respond to environmental cues. This ability may be impacted by impairments in cognitive processing, which may lead to individuals experiencing increased anxiety when negotiating a shared zone.

Method

Q method was used in order to identify and explore the viewpoints of pedestrians, with and without cognitive impairments as they pertain to shared zones.

Results

Two viewpoints were revealed. Viewpoint one was defined by “confident users” while viewpoint two was defined by users who “know what [they] are doing but drivers might not”.

Discussion

Overall, participants in the study would not avoid shared zones. Pedestrians with intellectual disability were, however, not well represented by either viewpoint, suggesting that shared zones may pose a potential barrier to participation for this group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science , 2018. Vol. 13, no 9, article id e0203765
National Category
Applied Psychology Occupational Therapy
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41422DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0203765ISI: 000444355500042PubMedID: 30204784Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85053105447Local ID: HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-41422DiVA, id: diva2:1247535
Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved

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Falkmer, TorbjörnFalkmer, Marita

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