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Urban occupational structures as information networks: The effect on network density of increasing number of occupations
Global Security Initiative, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States.
School of Sustainability, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States.
Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States.
Arizona State University, Santa Fe Institute Center for Biosocial Complex Systems, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States.
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 5, article id e0196915Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban economies are composed of diverse activities, embodied in labor occupations, which depend on one another to produce goods and services. Yet little is known about how the nature and intensity of these interdependences change as cities increase in population size and economic complexity. Understanding the relationship between occupational interdependencies and the number of occupations defining an urban economy is relevant because interdependence within a networked system has implications for system resilience and for how easily can the structure of the network be modified. Here, we represent the interdependencies among occupations in a city as a non-spatial information network, where the strengths of interdependence between pairs of occupations determine the strengths of the links in the network. Using those quantified link strengths we calculate a single metric of interdependence–or connectedness–which is equivalent to the density of a city’s weighted occupational network. We then examine urban systems in six industrialized countries, analyzing how the density of urban occupational networks changes with network size, measured as the number of unique occupations present in an urban workforce. We find that in all six countries, density, or economic interdependence, increases superlinearly with the number of distinct occupations. Because connections among occupations represent flows of information, we provide evidence that connectivity scales superlinearly with network size in information networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science , 2018. Vol. 13, no 5, article id e0196915
Keywords [en]
article, developed country, human, occupation
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41090DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0196915ISI: 000431481700032Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85046632009Local ID: IHHÖvrigtISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-41090DiVA, id: diva2:1236525
Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2019-02-18Bibliographically approved

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Mellander, Charlotta

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