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Young children's experiences of living an everyday life with cancer – A three year interview study
Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8596-6020
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6419-2417
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 39, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The young child's experiences of living with cancer are crucial to providing evidence based care. This study explores and describes experiences of everyday life of young children with cancer, over a three year period from diagnosis.

Method

This is a longitudinal, inductive interview study with young children with cancer, and their parents. Interviews from shortly after diagnosis, six and 12 months after diagnosis have been reanalysed. Interviews with the same children and their parents from 18 to 36 months after diagnosis have been analysed for the first time in the present paper. A longitudinal temporal analysis at category level for five synchronic data sets forms the basis for the results.

Results

The child living with cancer over a three year period is described as a child apart, striving to live an everyday life. This description is built on three categories: I want to be a child like any other, I need security and control and I feel lonely and left out. Young children with cancer actively strive to understand their illness, participate in care and live an ordinary everyday life- but with ongoing feelings of social isolation and loneliness.

Conclusions

Young children with cancer need access to and ongoing contact with peers and preschool. A structured follow-up throughout the cancer trajectory and not just during active treatment, is necessary. A child-centred philosophy of care would guide the child towards attainment of health and wellbeing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 39, p. 1-9
Keywords [en]
Childhood cancer, Everyday life, Young child, Longitudinal
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42409DOI: 10.1016/j.ejon.2018.12.007ISI: 000462419500001PubMedID: 30850132Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85059446147OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-42409DiVA, id: diva2:1274569
Available from: 2019-01-02 Created: 2019-01-02 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved

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Darcy, LauraEnskär, KarinBjörk, Maria

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