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Bouwmeester Stjernetun, B., Hallgren, J. & Gillsjö, C. (2023). Effects of an age suit simulation on nursing students' perspectives on providing care to older persons: an education intervention study. Educational gerontology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of an age suit simulation on nursing students' perspectives on providing care to older persons: an education intervention study
2023 (English)In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Nursing students are important future health care providers to the growing number of older persons in society. However, two barriers are their common ageist attitudes and lack of interest in geriatrics. This is a concern in light of the global demand for nurses and a challenge that need to be addressed in nurse education. Age suit simulation has been shown to affect the attitudes of students toward older persons, but the important context of home is often missing from studies. Accordingly, the present study employed a quantitative approach with the goal of investigating the effects of aging simulation with an age suit in a home context as a part of experiential learning among second-year nursing students. The age simulation allowed the students to experience both specific and common health problems from the patient's point of view in a controlled environment and a relevant context: the home. Data were collected using a questionnaire in a quasi-experimental pretest - posttest design with a control group. Results showed that the intervention had a positive effect on various aspects of the nursing students' perspectives on caring for older persons. Work experience was associated with more positive attitudes. The control group was more negative toward geriatrics as a career choice than the intervention group. In conclusion, age suit simulation can be an innovative part of nurse education because it raises awareness and understanding of the health challenges of older persons, which are important in combating ageism among future nurses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
National Category
Nursing Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62594 (URN)10.1080/03601277.2023.2258051 (DOI)001067372900001 ()2-s2.0-85171580015 (Scopus ID)HOA;;907717 (Local ID)HOA;;907717 (Archive number)HOA;;907717 (OAI)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20210227
Available from: 2023-10-04 Created: 2023-10-04 Last updated: 2024-02-19
Åberg, C., Berglund, M., Hallgren, J. & Gillsjö, C. (2021). Older persons’ experiences of Reflective STRENGTH-Giving Dialogues – ‘It's a push to move forward’. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 35(3), 779-787
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older persons’ experiences of Reflective STRENGTH-Giving Dialogues – ‘It's a push to move forward’
2021 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 779-787Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rationale: Experiences of the innovative method Reflective STRENGTH-Giving Dialogue (STRENGTH), which is grounded in a lifeworld perspective and developed to improve quality of care, is described in this study. Innovative thinking in developing health and social care, which may include digital solutions, is required to ensure a meaningful and dignified life in old age.

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe experiences of the intervention Reflective STRENGTH-Giving Dialogue from the perspective of older persons living with long-term health problems.

Method: Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with 27 older persons who participated in the intervention. The older persons wrote notes from each dialogue in booklets, and the booklets became part of the study data, analysed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach.

Results: STRENGTH is experienced as an opportunity to reflect upon life and identify small and large life projects. Dialogues that lead to change in thoughts and actions influence the older persons' well-being, sense of balance, joy and meaning in life. There is an experience of STRENGTH as a starting point and a push to move forward in an effort to experience joy and meaning in life when living with long-term health problems.

Conclusions: STRENGTH has the potential to contribute to quality improvement in person-centred care and enhance meaning in life for older persons living with long-term health problems. However, the use of a digital tool in this particular context poses challenges that must be considered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
dialogue, digitalisation, intervention, long-term health problem, older person, person-centred care, phenomenology, qualitative research, reflective lifeworld research, STRENGTH, aged, article, female, human, human experiment, interview, male, social care, thinking, total quality management, wellbeing
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50323 (URN)10.1111/scs.12892 (DOI)000555802600001 ()32761648 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85089090715 (Scopus ID)HOA;;1459582 (Local ID)HOA;;1459582 (Archive number)HOA;;1459582 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-08-20 Created: 2020-08-20 Last updated: 2022-03-16Bibliographically approved
Johansson, L., Finkel, D., Lannering, C., Dahl Aslan, A. K., Andersson-Gäre, B., Hallgren, J., . . . Ernsth-Bravell, M. (2021). Using aggregated data from Swedish national quality registries as tools to describe health conditions of older adults with complex needs. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, 33, 1297-1306
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using aggregated data from Swedish national quality registries as tools to describe health conditions of older adults with complex needs
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2021 (English)In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 33, p. 1297-1306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Combining National Quality Registries (NQRs) with existing National Health Registries (NHRs) might make it possible to get a wider picture of older adults health situation. The aim was to examine the feasibility of aggregating data across different NQRs and existing NHRs to explore the possibility to investigate trajectories and patterns of disease and care, specifically for the most ill older adults.

Method: A Swedish twin population (N = 44,816) was linked to nine NQRs and four NHRs. A descriptive mixed-method study was performed. A manifest content analysis identified which health parameters were collected from each NQR. Factor analysis identified patterns in representation across NQRs. Two case studies illustrated individual trajectories of care by using NQRs and NHRs.

Results: About 36% of the population was registered in one or more NQRs. NQRs included 1849 variables that were sorted into 13 categories with extensive overlap across the NQRs. Health and function variables were identified, but few social or cognitive variables. Even though most individuals demonstrated unique patterns of multi-morbidities, factor analysis identified three clusters of representation in the NQRs with sufficient sample sizes for future investigations. The two cases illustrated the possibility of following patterns of disease and trajectories of care.

Conclusions: NQRs seem to be a significant source for collecting data about a population that may be underrepresented in most research on aging because of their age and poor health. However, NQRs are primarily disease related, and further development of the registries to maximize coverage and utility is needed. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Health care, National quality register, Older adults, Social service
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-49617 (URN)10.1007/s40520-020-01629-6 (DOI)000539922500002 ()32535857 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85086440245 (Scopus ID)HOA;;1445090 (Local ID)HOA;;1445090 (Archive number)HOA;;1445090 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-8689
Available from: 2020-06-22 Created: 2020-06-22 Last updated: 2021-12-13Bibliographically approved
Hallgren, J., Johansson, L., Lannering, C., Ernsth-Bravell, M. & Gillsjö, C. (2020). Health- and social care in the last year of life among older adults in Sweden. BMC Palliative Care, 19(1), Article ID 90.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health- and social care in the last year of life among older adults in Sweden
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2020 (English)In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In the last years of life, burden of disease and disability and need of health- and social care often increase. Social, functional and psychological factors may be important in regard to social- and health care utilization. This study aims to describe use of health- and social care during the last year of life among persons living in ordinary housing or in assisted living facilities.

METHODS: A retrospective study examining health- and social care utilization during their last year of life, using a subsample from the Swedish twin registries individually linked to several Swedish national quality registries (NQR). Persons that died during 2008-2009 and 2011-2012 (n = 1518) were selected.

RESULTS: Mean age at death was 85.9 ± 7.3 (range 65.1-109.0). Among the 1518 participants (women n = 888, 58.5%), of which 741 (49%) were living in assisted living facilities and 1061 (69.9%) had at least one hospitalization during last year of life. The most common causes of death were cardiovascular disease (43.8%) and tumors (15.3%). A multivariable logistic regression revealed that living in ordinary housing, younger age and higher numbers of NQR's increased the likelihood of hospitalization.

CONCLUSIONS: Persons in their last year of life consumed high amount of health- and social care although 12% did not receive any home care. Married persons received less home care than never married. Persons living in ordinary housing had higher numbers of hospitalizations compared to participants in assisted living facilities. Older persons and persons registered in fewer NQR's were less hospitalized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2020
Keywords
Home care services, Hospitalization, Last year of life, National Quality Registries, Older adults
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50105 (URN)10.1186/s12904-020-00598-x (DOI)000544894400002 ()32576290 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087002004 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2020 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2020 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2020 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-8689
Available from: 2020-07-17 Created: 2020-07-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Åberg, C., Gillsjö, C., Hallgren, J. & Berglund, M. (2020). “It is like living in a diminishing world”: older persons’ experiences of living with long-term health problems–prior to the STRENGTH intervention. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 15(1), Article ID 1747251.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“It is like living in a diminishing world”: older persons’ experiences of living with long-term health problems–prior to the STRENGTH intervention
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 1747251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Ageing is often associated with multiple long-term health problems influencing older persons’ well-being in daily living. It is not unusual that the point of interest in research is often on the management of the actual health problem instead of being holistic and person-centred. Purpose: To describe the phenomenon of living with long-term health problems that influence daily living, from the older persons’ perspective. Methods: Qualitative individual interviews were conducted with 34 older persons living with long-term health problems. The data were analysed using a Reflected Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach, grounded in phenomenology. Results: Life with long-term health problems entails living in a diminishing world. It entails living in uncertainty, not being able to trust one’s own ability. The freedom to make decisions of your own is deprived by relatives and health-care providers. Living with long-term health problems entails being dependent on support in daily life and a strive to maintain meaningfulness in daily living. Conclusions: The results address a need for extended individual and holistic guidance and support in living with long-term health problems to increase the older person’s sense of well-being and meaning in life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Ageing, health problem, illness, multimorbidity, patient perspective, phenomenology, qualitative research, reflective lifeworld research, strength, well-being
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48750 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2020.1747251 (DOI)000526446300001 ()32275201 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85083506007 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2020 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2020 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2020 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-06-03 Created: 2020-06-03 Last updated: 2022-03-16Bibliographically approved
Hallgren, J. (2019). Mobile integrated care – Healthcare professionals experiences. In: : . Paper presented at International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics European Region Congress 2019, 23rd – 25th May 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobile integrated care – Healthcare professionals experiences
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43745 (URN)
Conference
International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics European Region Congress 2019, 23rd – 25th May 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2020-10-02Bibliographically approved
Hallgren, J. & Dahl Aslan, A. K. (2019). Risk of hospitalization and readmission. In: : . Paper presented at International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics European Region Congress 2019, 23rd – 25th May 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk of hospitalization and readmission
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43755 (URN)
Conference
International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics European Region Congress 2019, 23rd – 25th May 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2020-10-02Bibliographically approved
Hallgren, J., Fransson, E., Reynolds, C. A., Finkel, D., Pedersen, N. L. & Dahl Aslan, A. K. (2018). Cognitive trajectories in relation to hospitalization among older Swedish adults. Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), 74, 9-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive trajectories in relation to hospitalization among older Swedish adults
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2018 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 74, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION:

Research indicate that cognitive impairment might be related to hospitalization, but little is known about these effects over time.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess cognitive change before and after hospitalization among older adults in a population-based longitudinal study with up to 25 years of follow-up.

METHOD:

A longitudinal study on 828 community living men and women aged 50-86 from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Ageing (SATSA) were linked to The Swedish National Inpatient Register. Up to 8 assessments of cognitive performance (general cognitive ability, verbal, spatial/fluid, memory, and processing speed) from 1986 to 2010 were available. Latent growth curve modelling was used to assess the association between cognitive performance and hospitalization including spline models to analyse cognitive trajectories pre- and post-hospitalization.

RESULTS:

A total of 735 persons (89%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up. Mean age at first hospitalization was 70.2 (±9.3)years. Persons who were hospitalized exhibited a lower mean level of cognitive performance in general ability, processing speed and spatial/fluid ability compared with those who were not hospitalized. The two-slope models revealed steeper cognitive decline before hospitalization than after among those with at least one hospitalization event, as compared to non-hospitalized persons who showed steeper cognitive decline after the centering age of 70 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Persons being hospitalized in late life have lower cognitive performance across all assessed domains. The results indicate that the main decline occurs before the hospitalization, and not after. This might indicate that when you get treatment you also benefit cognitively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Cognition; Hospitalization; Latent growth curve modelling; Longitudinal study; Old age
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29963 (URN)10.1016/j.archger.2017.09.002 (DOI)000415983300002 ()28923532 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029433562 (Scopus ID)HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-05-19 Created: 2016-05-19 Last updated: 2020-10-02Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, I. K., Hallgren, J., Pedersen, N. L., Reynolds, C. A. & Dahl Aslan, A. K. (2018). Genetic influences on body mass index across Adulthood and late-life. Paper presented at The Gerontological Society of America's 70th Annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, November 14-18, 2018. Innovation in Aging, 2(suppl_1), 620-620
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic influences on body mass index across Adulthood and late-life
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2018 (English)In: Innovation in Aging, E-ISSN 2399-5300, Vol. 2, no suppl_1, p. 620-620Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although genetic factors significantly contribute to variation in body-mass index (BMI), the effects appear to differ with age. To investigate this, we applied polygenic methods to longitudinal data from the Swedish Twin Registry where BMI was available for age categories ranging from 20–35 to above 80. Using GCTA, a polygenic method to estimate heritability, we showed that heritability explains around 20% of the variability in BMI across age categories. However, a polygenic risk score based on the largest GWAS of BMI (PRSBMI) explained 4–6% of the variation in BMI before 65, but less than 0.5% after age 65. This indicates that while there is substantial heritability of BMI across adulthood and late-life, the genetic variants identified in GWAS mainly predict BMI before age 65. Hence, more work is warranted studying the genetics of BMI in late-life, to better understand its biology and what distinguishes it from BMI earlier in adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42749 (URN)10.1093/geroni/igy023.2311 (DOI)HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJARNIS (OAI)
Conference
The Gerontological Society of America's 70th Annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, November 14-18, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2020-11-18Bibliographically approved
Hallgren, J. (2018). Risk factors for hospital readmission among Swedish older adults. European Geriatric Medicine, 9(5), 603-611
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk factors for hospital readmission among Swedish older adults
2018 (English)In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 603-611Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction 

Hospital readmissions of older persons are common and often associated with complex health problems. The objectives were to analyze risk factors for readmission within 30 days from hospital discharge.

Methods

A prospective study with a multifactorial approach based on the population-based longitudinal Swedish Adoption/ Twin Study of Aging (SATSA) was conducted. During 9 years of follow-up, information on hospitalizations, readmissions and associated diagnoses were obtained from national registers. Logistic regression models controlling for age and sex were conducted to analyze risk factors for readmissions.

Results

Of the 772 participants, [mean age 69.7 (±11.1), 84 (63%)] were hospitalized and among these 208 (43%) had one or several readmissions within 30 days during the follow-up period. Most of the readmissions (57%) occurred within the frst week; mean days from hospital discharge to readmission was 7.9 (±6.2). The most common causes of admission and readmission were cardiovascular diseases and tumors. Only 8% of the readmissions were regarded as avoidable admissions. In a multivariate logistic regression, falling within the last 12 months (OR 0.57, p=0.039) and being a male (OR 1.84, p=0.006) increased the risk of readmission.

Conclusions

Most older persons that are readmitted return to hospital within the frst week after discharge. Experiencing a fall was a particular risk factor of readmission. Preventive actions should preferably take place already at the hospital to reduce the numbers of readmission. Still, it should be remembered that most readmissions were considered to be necessary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Readmission; Prospective design; Older persons; Falls; Logistic regression
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41440 (URN)10.1007/s41999-018-0101-z (DOI)000445464700007 ()30294396 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054336960 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2020-10-02Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1819-0896

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