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Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Nyström, A.-G., McCauley, B., Macey, J., Scholz, T. M., Besombes, N., Cestino-Castilla, J., . . . Törhönen, M. (2022). Current issues of sustainability in esports. International Journal of Esports, 1(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Current issues of sustainability in esports
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Esports, E-ISSN 2634-1069, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aim of the paper is to explore emerging themes, which support the development of a sustainable esports industry.

Methods and results: This study is based on a workshop methodology, which aims to identify and explore topics perceived as most pertinent by individuals with an intimate understanding of the dynamics of the esports context. Two workshops were held with a total of 64 participants, representing both academia and industry stakeholders. Interpretations of the sustainability of esports were thus recorded, developed, critiqued, and refined through social interaction with experts. The results indicate three critical themes to address regarding the development of sustainability of esports, namely a) health and inclusiveness, b) the incomplete industry structure, and c) the immature business logic.

Conclusions: Sustainability refers to the ability of esports to survive or persist. We argue that sustainability is dependent on how well industry stakeholders can address the identified themes. Currently, social sustainability is the primary concern of both practitioners and researchers of esports. Economic sustainability mostly deals with securing business growth, while environmental sustainability is not yet perceived as a relevant topic (e.g., using sustainable technologies and energy-saving related to gaming and competitive events). Structures and processes within esports presently constitute the focus of sustainability in esports.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Journal of Esports, 2022
Keywords
esports, sustainability, economic sustainability, social sustainability
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-58730 (URN)POA;intsam;839751 (Local ID)POA;intsam;839751 (Archive number)POA;intsam;839751 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-10-28 Created: 2022-10-28 Last updated: 2022-10-28Bibliographically approved
Rumble, R., Caccamo, M., McCauley, B. & Steigenberger, N. (2021). Nascent entrepreneurs’ networking paradox in the creative industries. In: : . Paper presented at 37th EGOS Colloquium, 8-10 July, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nascent entrepreneurs’ networking paradox in the creative industries
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-58738 (URN)
Conference
37th EGOS Colloquium, 8-10 July, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Available from: 2022-10-28 Created: 2022-10-28 Last updated: 2022-10-28Bibliographically approved
Rumble, R., Steigenberger, N., Caccamo, M. & McCauley, B. (2020). The networking paradox in early-stage entrepreneurship and how introvert entrepreneurs navigate it in networking events: A study in the indie games industry. In: : . Paper presented at Gaming & Esports Summit 2020.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The networking paradox in early-stage entrepreneurship and how introvert entrepreneurs navigate it in networking events: A study in the indie games industry
2020 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50699 (URN)
Conference
Gaming & Esports Summit 2020
Available from: 2020-09-25 Created: 2020-09-25 Last updated: 2020-09-25Bibliographically approved
Rumble, R. (2019). The Startup Jungle: Four-dimensional Business Modelling. Journal of Business Models, 7(3), 25-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Startup Jungle: Four-dimensional Business Modelling
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Models, E-ISSN 2246-2465, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 25-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Startup Jungle is a four-dimensional business-modelling tool used in Masters level entrepreneurship education. It combines a metaphorical jungle landscape with the dynamics of interplay to map business ecosystems, model new ones, develop implementation strategies, consider consequences, and scenario plan.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aalborg Universitetsforlag, 2019
Keywords
Business model; serious game; ecosystem
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46381 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2023-02-23Bibliographically approved
Genet, C. & Rumble, R. (2018). Reassessing lone wolves: How laboratory-spinoff relations impact research. In: : . Paper presented at 34th EGOS Colloquium, July 5–7, 2018, Tallinn, Estonia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reassessing lone wolves: How laboratory-spinoff relations impact research
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46387 (URN)
Conference
34th EGOS Colloquium, July 5–7, 2018, Tallinn, Estonia
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Rumble, R. (2018). The origins of constellations: Analysing conjectural outcomes in the social sciences. In: : . Paper presented at 34th EGOS Colloquium, July 5–7, 2018, Tallinn, Estonia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The origins of constellations: Analysing conjectural outcomes in the social sciences
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Set-theoretic methods (STMs), have enabled social scientists to systematically analyse society/ies in ways that could not be achieved using contemporary statistical methods (Fiss, 2007). By assuming complex causality, STMs are able to: (a) identify multiple paths to the same outcome; (b) identify configurations of contingencies and nullifying forces; and (c) distinguish between ‘sufficient’ and ‘necessary’ causal conditions (Schneider & Wagemann, 2012). Therefore, these methods are well suited to the analysis of social reality (Ragin, 1987). Complex causality also implies conjunctural outcomes, as well as causes. Yet, the current literature on STMs restricts their application to the identification of individual, isolated outcomes. The reason for this appear to be methodological rather than philosophical, and a few methodologists have made efforts to incorporate multifinality (cf. Baumgartner, 2009). However, to date, these innovations are limited to the analysis of multiple individual outcomes, rather than conjunctural ones. This paper therefore asks: 1. Should social scientists concern themselves with conjunctural outcomes, and, if so; 2. How might we analyse and identify conjunctural outcomes. This paper presents both an ontological and a pragmatic argument for the study of conjunctural outcomes. In the case of the former, open systems are inherently susceptible to side-effects and externalities. For the latter, the paper highlights the importance for politicians and managers alike to simultaneously achieve conflicting and/or paradoxical outcomes; e.g., economic growth and carbon reduction (Mason, 2015), or the Triple Bottom Line (Jeurissen, 2000); and for the analysis of outcomes that are inherently complex and combinatory, such as business models (Rumble & Mangematin, 2015). For simplicity’s sake, this paper will focus on business studies and an illustrative setting in which to apply the arguments set forth in this paper. To answer the second question, the paper clarifies how the causal logic of existing STMs can be reinterpreted to identify conjunctural outcomes. The paper ends with an illustration of how this can be done using QCA in an analytical process I term reverse-QCA (‘rQCA').

Keywords
Set theory; QCA; Conjunctural outcomes; Complex causality
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46382 (URN)
Conference
34th EGOS Colloquium, July 5–7, 2018, Tallinn, Estonia
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Rumble, R. (2018). The role of strategic tools in situated cognition. In: : . Paper presented at 33th EGOS Colloquium, July 6–8, 2018, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of strategic tools in situated cognition
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46388 (URN)
Conference
33th EGOS Colloquium, July 6–8, 2018, Copenhagen, Denmark
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Rumble, R. & Dia, T. (2018). Weighty subjects: The properties of material artifacts in embodied strategic cognition. In: : . Paper presented at 34th EGOS Colloquium, July 5–7, 2018, Tallinn, Estonia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weighty subjects: The properties of material artifacts in embodied strategic cognition
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper outlines an ongoing pilot study into the priming effects for weight on management decision making. Studies from cognitive and social psychology have documented the ability for physical sensations to prime our cognitive functions in areas such as perception, memory, problem-solving, and risk-tolerance; all central processes to good management. In this study, we seek to identify if these theoretical findings can be applied to a business setting and determine whether the sensations that strategy tools project might be priming managers toward certain strategic decisions. In our pilot study, we gave half the participants heavy folders, and the other half light ones, and ask them to perform a SWOT analysis. Then they are asked to choose between two different strategies – one financially optimal, and the other socially conscious. Our preliminary results suggest the framing of the scenario needs to be altered, as all respondents select the socially conscious option, regardless of treatment. However, participants in the heavy group are much more verbose and detailed in the justification of their decision, in line with results from similar empirical studies that suggest weight primes individuals to become more thoughtful and treat tasks with greater attention and seriousness.

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46383 (URN)
Conference
34th EGOS Colloquium, July 5–7, 2018, Tallinn, Estonia
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Rumble, R. & Minto, N. A. (2017). How to use analogies for creative business modelling. Journal of Business Strategy, 38(2), 76-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to use analogies for creative business modelling
2017 (English)In: Journal of Business Strategy, ISSN 0275-6668, E-ISSN 2052-1197, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 76-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This paper aims to present a method for interpreting and reinterpreting business models as analogies to support the creation of new business model ideas.

Design/methodology/approach: The authors use the literature on cognitive frames and attention to demonstrate the often-overlooked potential of analogies. From this, the authors derive practical recommendations for the use of analogies in creative business model design.

Findings: Managers can design creative business models by seeking multiple interpretations of the way other businesses create and capture value.

Originality/value: Business model frameworks are commonplace, but there is little discussion on how to use them effectively. Furthermore, while analogies are helpful in inspiring novel ideas, their creative potential is limited if the questions asked of and insights found in the case study are not reimagined. The authors provide a practical solution to increase creativity in business model design by recursively reflecting upon issues and solutions. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Keywords
Analogy, Attention, Business model, Creativity, Design, Interpretation, Tool
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46379 (URN)10.1108/JBS-09-2016-0091 (DOI)2-s2.0-85019648429 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Rumble, R. & Genet, C. (2017). Reassessing lone wolves: How collective and institutionalized spinoffs benefit academia. In: : . Paper presented at 2017 Annual Meeting of the Technology Transfer Society (T2S), November 2 - November 4, 2017, Washington DC, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reassessing lone wolves: How collective and institutionalized spinoffs benefit academia
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The literature on academic entrepreneurship literature has paid close attention to the beneficial and detrimental impacts of spinoffs on reputation, finance, and technology transfer. Less well-researched, however, is the connection between spinoff processes and their impact on academic research. To explore this relationship, we conducted interviews and collected archival data from forty STEM laboratories in France that has recently produced spinoffs. We adopted an iterative, mixed-method approach combining case histories of the laboratories with coincidence analysis (CNA). Our analyses identify three spinoff processes that are consistently associated with beneficial research impact, including one connected with spinoff failure. In each of these situations, the roles, motivations, and relationships between actors during and after spinoff are central to explaining the catalysing effect on laboratory research.

Keywords
spinoff; academic entrepreneurship; research; relationality; coincidence analysis
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46384 (URN)
Conference
2017 Annual Meeting of the Technology Transfer Society (T2S), November 2 - November 4, 2017, Washington DC, USA
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8896-4845

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