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Engberg, Aron
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Engberg, A. (2019). Materializing the Bible. Journal of Heritage Tourism, 14(1), 83-84
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Materializing the Bible
2019 (English)In: Journal of Heritage Tourism, ISSN 1743-873X, E-ISSN 1747-6631, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 83-84Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46308 (URN)10.1080/1743873X.2018.1504647 (DOI)000451585600007 ()2-s2.0-85057537083 (Scopus ID)
Note

Digital Scholarship Review.

Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Engberg, A. (2019). Walking on the pages of the word of God: Self, land, and text among evangelical volunteers in Jerusalem. Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Walking on the pages of the word of God: Self, land, and text among evangelical volunteers in Jerusalem
2019 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Summary provided by publisher:

In Walking on the Pages of the Word of God Aron Engberg explores the religious language and identities of evangelical volunteer workers in contemporary Jerusalem. The volunteers are connected to Christian organizations which consider their work a natural consequence of the biblical promises to Israel and their responsibility to “bless the Jewish people”. 

Relying on ethnographic data of the discursive practices of the volunteers, the book explores a central puzzle of Zionist Christianity: the narrative production of Israel’s religious significance and its relationship to broader Christian language traditions. By focusing on the volunteers’ stories about themselves, the land and the Bible, Aron Engberg offers a convincing account about how the State of Israel is finding its way into evangelical identities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019. p. 213
Series
Currents of Encounter: Studies in Interreligious and Intercultural Relations, ISSN 0923-6201 ; 59
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46649 (URN)10.1163/9789004411890 (DOI)978-90-04-41189-0 (ISBN)978-90-04-40912-5 (ISBN)
Note

Originally published: Lund: Lund University, 2016 (Doctoral thesis). ISBN: 978-91-88473-11-0.

Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved
Engberg, A. (2016). Evangelical Volunteers in Israel as Long-Term Pilgrims: Ambassadors for the Kingdom. In: M. Leppäkari & K. A. Griffin (Ed.), Pilgrimage and Tourism to Holy Cities: Ideological and Management Perspectives (pp. 161-174). Wallingford: CABI Publishing, s. 161-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evangelical Volunteers in Israel as Long-Term Pilgrims: Ambassadors for the Kingdom
2016 (English)In: Pilgrimage and Tourism to Holy Cities: Ideological and Management Perspectives / [ed] M. Leppäkari & K. A. Griffin, Wallingford: CABI Publishing, 2016, Vol. s. 161-174, p. 161-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Drawing from several years of field work and about 30 life story interviews,this chapter presents a case of contemporary evangelical mobility that cannotbe squarely placed within any of the related academic debates about ‘(religious)tourism’, ‘pilgrimage’, ‘short-term missions’, ‘international volunteering’ or ‘migration’ simply because it is intrinsically related to all these phenomena at the same time. Pro-Zionist Evangelical Christians come to Jerusalem from all parts of the world; some of them as part of biblical tours, some for Christian conferences or for Hebrew courses and yet others come as volunteers.This latter group is engaged in what often looks like secular humanitarian work, or sometimes even political activism, but explains these activities almost exclusively in religious terms. Initially, they come for a short period of time but often end up staying in Jerusalem for 10 years or more. What looks like a temporary adventure often turns out to be something more akin to a ‘way of life’. Thus, I will explore this phenomenon as a case of ‘long-term pilgrimage’ in order to discuss the religious meanings that the volunteers attach to their time in Israel, the practices that they are involved in and to the place itself. Apart from providing more data on contemporary religiously motivated travel patterns I hope that this case will prove useful in reconsidering the traditional boundaries between ‘tourism’, ‘volunteer work’ and ‘pilgrimage’, and perhaps also illuminate something of the underlying theoretical quagmires about the relationship between ‘the secular’ and ‘the religious’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wallingford: CABI Publishing, 2016
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46305 (URN)9781780647388 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Engberg, A. (2016). Walking on the pages of the word of God: Self, land, and text among evangelical volunteers in Jerusalem. (Doctoral dissertation). Lund: Lund University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Walking on the pages of the word of God: Self, land, and text among evangelical volunteers in Jerusalem
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

During the last thirty years, the Evangelical relationship with the State of Israel has drawn much academic and popular attention, particularly from historical, theological, and political perspectives. This dissertation engages with this literature but also complements it with an ethnographic account of the discursive practices of Evangelical Zionists through which, it is suggested, much of the religious significance of the contemporary state is being produced. The study is based on ethnographic fieldwork among Evangelical volunteer workers in Jerusalem, focusing on their stories about themselves, the land, and the biblical text. The volunteers are located at three Christian ministries in Jerusalem – the International Christian Embassy Jerusalem (ICEJ), theBridges for Peace (BFP), and the Christian Friends of Israel (CFI) – all of which consider their work in Israel a natural consequence of biblical promises to Israel and their responsibility as Christians to “bless the Jewish people”. After introducing the theoretical and socio-cultural context in which this study is located, Chapter Three analyses the volunteers’ “coming-to-Israel” stories and the ways in which agency and selftransformation are understood therein. The analysis suggests that the ritual-like performance of these narratives situates the encounter with Israel as a religious conversion process and Israel as a religious symbol. Chapter Four discusses the volunteers’ narrative production of Israel as a sacred space that has a unique ability to mediate divine presence. It also shows how Israel’s special status is being negotiated both in relation to the encounter with material realities and with ideas about religious fetishism. The final analytical chapter focuses on “biblical literalism” as a textual ideology and on how this ideology becomes manifest in discourses about Bible prophecy and the “Hebraic roots of Christian faith”. It is suggested that these two discursive domains are deeply embedded in contestations about the authenticity of Evangelical religious forms: while the former often serves as empirical evidence for the truth of the biblical scripture, the latter constructs a historical narrative within which Evangelical Zionism is positioned as a rediscovery of authentic biblical faith. Ultimately, this study suggests that the beliefs and practices of Evangelical Christians engaged with Israel not only represent a recalibration of the relationship between Christianity and Judaism and between faith and politicsthemselves, but also a more fundamental reordering of the ways in which God is understood to relate to the world. While deeply embedded in Evangelical narrative traditions, the ideational and physical encounter with Israel also requires a renegotiation of Evangelical religion. This process involves questions of biblical reading practices and the meanings of signs and their social functions, and it invites Evangelical Zionists to negotiate the proper location of human and divine agency as well as the relationship between materiality and divine presence. For the volunteers the “realization of Israel’s spiritual significance” is a highly transformative experience, but rather than being a definite rupture from the past it is part of a broader process of increasing religious commitment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Lund University, 2016. p. 231
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46310 (URN)978-91-88473-11-0 (ISBN)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Engberg, A. (2014). 'A Fool for Christ': Sense-Making and Negotiation of Identity in the Life Story of a Christian Soldier. In: G. Gunner & R. O. Smith (Ed.), Comprehending Christian Zionism: perspectives in comparison (pp. 33-59). Minneapolis: Fortress Press, s. 33-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'A Fool for Christ': Sense-Making and Negotiation of Identity in the Life Story of a Christian Soldier
2014 (English)In: Comprehending Christian Zionism: perspectives in comparison / [ed] G. Gunner & R. O. Smith, Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2014, Vol. s. 33-59, p. 33-59Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter presents a narrative analysis of the life story of a Swedish Pentecostal who decided to join the Israeli Defense Forces out of his conviction that God wanted him to protect the chosen people. His story is treated as an example of lived Christian Zionism; as one of many manifestations that contemporary Christian affection for Israel can take. The analysis focuses on the central narrative pattern of calling-test of faith-confirmation, 'Jacob's' sense-making of his life choices, and the negotiation of his identity in relation to larger religious and cultural narratives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2014
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46303 (URN)9781451472264 (ISBN)9781451489644 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Engberg, A. (2014). Book review: Hillary Kaell, Walking Where Jesus Walked - American Christians and Holy Land Pilgrimage [Review]. Swedish Missiological Themes, 102(3), 311-314
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book review: Hillary Kaell, Walking Where Jesus Walked - American Christians and Holy Land Pilgrimage
2014 (English)In: Swedish Missiological Themes, ISSN 0346-217X, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 311-314Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Institute of Mission Research, 2014
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46309 (URN)
Note

Review of: Hillary Kaell, Walking where Jesus Walked – American Christians and Holy Land Pilgrimage, New York & London: New York University Press, 2014, 259 pp. ISBN: 9780814738368.

Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Engberg, A. (2012). Evangelicalism in the interspaces: The construction of Judeo-Christian identity in a Messianic community in Jerusalem. Paper presented at Religion in the Interspace - Centre for Teology and Religious Studies, Lund, Sverige, 15-16 March. Swedish Missiological Themes, 100:3, s. 263-263(3), 263-281
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evangelicalism in the interspaces: The construction of Judeo-Christian identity in a Messianic community in Jerusalem
2012 (English)In: Swedish Missiological Themes, ISSN 0346-217X, Vol. 100:3, s. 263-263, no 3, p. 263-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is based on ethnographic field work in an evangelical/Messianic community in contemporary Jerusalem. In the paper I interpret the pro-Israeli strand of Evangelicalism’s fascination with Judaica and Jewish ritual in relation to the movement’s location in a temporal-spatial interspace. I argue that the Christian Zionist impulse to experiment with Jewish tradition needs to be understood as an attempt to navigate the religious interspaces which are formed by its strong identification with the Jewish people and the State of Israel, its integration of the national movement of Zionism into a specific Protestant eschatology and its concrete presence in the context of Israeli society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Institute of Mission Research, 2012
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46306 (URN)
Conference
Religion in the Interspace - Centre for Teology and Religious Studies, Lund, Sverige, 15-16 March
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Engberg, A. (2011). Book review: Phillip L. Hammack, Narrative and the Politics of Identity [Review]. Swedish Missiological Themes, 99(4), 491-493
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book review: Phillip L. Hammack, Narrative and the Politics of Identity
2011 (English)In: Swedish Missiological Themes, ISSN 0346-217X, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 491-493Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Institute of Mission Research, 2011
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46304 (URN)
Note

Review of: Phillip L. Hammack, Narrative and the Politics of Identity – The Cultural Psychology of Israeli and Palestinian Youth, New York: Oxford University Press, 2011, 398 pp. ISBN: 978-0-19-539446-7.

Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Engberg, A. (2011). Life Stories and Christian Zionist Ideology: A Theoretical Outline of How to Capture the Interplay between Individual and Ideology. In: P. Krogh Hansen (Ed.), Working with Stories: Narrative as a Meeting Place for Theory, Analysis and Practice: Proceedings from the 2nd ENN Conference, Kolding 2011. Paper presented at Working with Stories: Narrative as a Meeting Place for Theory, Analysis and Practice, The University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Danmark, 9-11 March, 2011 (pp. 68-77).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life Stories and Christian Zionist Ideology: A Theoretical Outline of How to Capture the Interplay between Individual and Ideology
2011 (English)In: Working with Stories: Narrative as a Meeting Place for Theory, Analysis and Practice: Proceedings from the 2nd ENN Conference, Kolding 2011 / [ed] P. Krogh Hansen, 2011, p. 68-77Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Christian Zionism is usually characterized as a theological and political movement grounded in literalist bible hermeneutics and End-time speculations that dedicate unwavering support to the State of Israel and the Jewish people. The prophetic element in Christian Zionism has in later years been downplayed for a more down-to-earth focus on social and political commitment to the well-being of the state of Israel. This shift in emphasis leaves the floor open to new investigations into the identification with Israel that is central to many western evangelicals’ understanding of their Christian faith. In my research I use narrative methods to investigate contemporary Christian volunteer workers in Israel. I want to investigate how individual life-stories relate to the grand narrative of Christian Zionism in order to answer the question of the symbolical value that Israel bears to these believers. In the present paper I discuss theoretical and methodological questions in relation to my research project. As the interplay between individual biographies and ideology is the particular focus of my research I use James A. Holstein and Jaber F. Gubrium’s theoretical approach combined with ethnographic methods.

National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46307 (URN)
Conference
Working with Stories: Narrative as a Meeting Place for Theory, Analysis and Practice, The University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Danmark, 9-11 March, 2011
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved

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