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Ma, Christina Zong-Hao, Ph.DORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6507-2329
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Ma, C.-H. Z., Bao, T., Le, V. C., Chambers, A., Cham, R., Shull, P., . . . Sienko, K. H. (2019). A feasibility study for gait training with foot-floor contact angle feedback. In: : . Paper presented at International Society of Posture and Gait Research (ISPGR) World Congress 2019, June 30 – July 4, Edinburgh, Scotland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A feasibility study for gait training with foot-floor contact angle feedback
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background and Aim: Slip events are responsible for up to 20% of falls and often result in severe injuries, and significant mortality and morbidity. Prior research has revealed several factors that increase the likelihood of a slip event including walking with a large foot-floor contact angle (FFCA) at heel-strike (>20°). Numerous feedback systems leveraging wearable sensors that measure gait-related kinematic or kinetic data have been used to improve balance and gait performance. In this feasibility study we demonstrated the use of a wearable feedback device for modifying FFCA during treadmill walking.

Methods: Ten healthy participants (3 females and 7 males, aged 22.0±1.6 years) with fewer than 75% of baseline overground FFCA values falling within a range of 10-20° were recruited for inclusion in the study. A feedback system comprising two IMUs attached to the mid-foot regions of participants' dominant and non-dominant feet to measure FFCA during heel strike events, a laptop for calculating FFCA, and speakers for providing auditory cues to participants was used. Participants received cues during the non-dominant foot stance phase if the average of the two preceding dominant FFCAs was outside of the target range (10-20°). Participants performed 2-min baseline and post-training treadmill trials with a speed of 1.35 m/s prior to and following four 4-min treadmill training trials with FFCA feedback. The percentage of FFCAs within the target range, and the mean and variability of FFCAs were computed for baseline, training, and post-training trials, and one-way repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc comparisons were performed. The significance level was 0.05.

Results: Participants increased their percentage of FFCAs within the target range when feedback was provided during the training trials compared to the no feedback condition during the baseline trials (66.9% vs. 53.9%, P=0.028). Increased percentages of FFCAs within the target range were also observed during the post-training trials (75.8% vs. 53.9%, P=0.027). The average FFCA increased from 9.9° during baseline trials to 13.7° during training trials (P=0.028). The FFCAs were less variable during the training (P=0.028) and post-training (P=0.028) trials compared to the baseline trials.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that participants could use the auditory cues to dynamically adjust their FFCAs while walking on a treadmill and that the training effects were present for a short period of time following the completion of the training. The FFCA is one of several gait parameters that could be used for gait training purposes to potentially reduce the likelihood of a slip event. Future work should examine the effects of gait training with FFCA feedback on the incidence and severity of slips, and on other gait parameters.

National Category
Medical Equipment Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42863 (URN)
Conference
International Society of Posture and Gait Research (ISPGR) World Congress 2019, June 30 – July 4, Edinburgh, Scotland
Available from: 2019-02-05 Created: 2019-02-05 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Ma, C.-H. Z., Ling, Y. T., Shea, Q. T., Wang, L.-K., Wang, X.-Y. & Zheng, Y.-P. (2019). Towards Wearable Comprehensive Capture and Analysis of Skeletal Muscle Activity during Human Locomotion. Sensors, 19(1), Article ID 195.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Wearable Comprehensive Capture and Analysis of Skeletal Muscle Activity during Human Locomotion
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2019 (English)In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Motion capture and analyzing systems are essential for understanding locomotion. However, the existing devices are too cumbersome and can be used indoors only. A newly-developed wearable motion capture and measurement system with multiple sensors and ultrasound imaging was introduced in this study. Methods: In ten healthy participants, the changes in muscle area and activity of gastrocnemius, plantarflexion and dorsiflexion of right leg during walking were evaluated by the developed system and the Vicon system. The existence of significant changes in a gait cycle, comparison of the ankle kinetic data captured by the developed system and the Vicon system, and test-retest reliability (evaluated by the intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC) in each channel’s data captured by the developed system were examined. Results: Moderate to good test-retest reliability of various channels of the developed system (0.512 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.988, p < 0.05), significantly high correlation between the developed system and Vicon system in ankle joint angles (0.638R ≤ 0.707, p < 0.05), and significant changes in muscle activity of gastrocnemius during a gait cycle (p < 0.05) were found. Conclusion: A newly developed wearable motion capture and measurement system with ultrasound imaging that can accurately capture the motion of one leg was evaluated in this study, which paves the way towards real-time comprehensive evaluation of muscles and joint motions during different activities in both indoor and outdoor environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: MDPI, 2019
Keywords
motion capture and analysis; wearable; ultrasound imaging; electromyography (EMG); sonomyograph (SMG); mechanomyography (MMG); plantar force; joint angle
National Category
Medical Engineering Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42860 (URN)10.3390/s19010195 (DOI)000458574600195 ()30621103 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059796161 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019; HHJOrtopedteknikIS (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019; HHJOrtopedteknikIS (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019; HHJOrtopedteknikIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-02-05 Created: 2019-02-05 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Elhadi, M. M. O., Ma, C.-H. Z., Lam, W. K. & Lee, W.-C. C. C. (2018). Biomechanical approach in facilitating long-distance walking of elderly people using footwear modifications. Gait & Posture, 64, 101-107
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomechanical approach in facilitating long-distance walking of elderly people using footwear modifications
2018 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 64, p. 101-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Long-distance walking is a convenient way for prompting physical activity of elderly people. However, walking ability declines with aging.

Research question: This study assessed if silicone insoles with heel lifts (named here the prescribed insoles) could facilitate long-distance walking of older adults.

Methods: Fifteen adults aged over 65, who did not have obvious lower-limb problems, walked on a treadmill for totally 60 min in two separate walking sessions: 1) with the prescribed insoles, and 2) with original insoles of the standardized shoes. Gait tests using force plates and a motion analysis system, and subjective evaluation using visual analog and Borg's CR10 scales were conducted at different time points of the treadmill walking.

Results: Objective gait anaylsis showed that without using the prescribed insoles, there were significant reductions (p < 0.05) in stance time, vertical ground reaction force, ankle dorsiflexion angle and ankle power generation of the dominant leg after the 60-minute treadmill walk. Such significant reductions were not observed in the same group of subjects upon using the prescribed insoles. Meanwhile, significant improvements in subjective perception of physical exertion, pain and fatigue were observed.

Significance: Heel lifts and silicone insoles are generally used to relieve plantar pain and reduce strain of plantar flexors in patients. This study showed they might also be solutions to facilitate long-distance walking of older adults, an approach which could prompt their physical activity. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Fatigue, Gait, Insoles, Long-distance walking, Older adults, Physical activity, silicone gel, aged, ankle, Article, biomechanics, clinical article, female, ground reaction force, heel, human, long distance walking, male, pain, perception, priority journal, standing, treadmill exercise, walking, clinical trial, exercise, exercise test, foot orthosis, physiology, shoe, very elderly, Aged, 80 and over, Biomechanical Phenomena, Foot Orthoses, Humans, Physical Exertion, Shoes
National Category
Occupational Therapy Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42465 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2018.05.032 (DOI)000437304400018 ()29894976 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048573600 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Ma, C.-H. Z., Zheng, Y.-P. & Lee, W.-C. C. C. (2018). Changes in gait and plantar foot loading upon using vibrotactile wearable biofeedback system in patients with stroke. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 25(1), 20-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in gait and plantar foot loading upon using vibrotactile wearable biofeedback system in patients with stroke
2018 (English)In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, ISSN 1074-9357, E-ISSN 1945-5119, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Patients with stroke walk with excessive foot inversion at the affected side, which may disturb their balance and gait.

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effects of instant biofeedback of plantar force at the medial and lateral forefoot regions on gait and plantar foot loading in patients with stroke.

Methods: A total of eight patients with hemiplegic stroke, who had flexible rearfoot varus deformity at the affected side, participated in this study. A vibrotactile biofeedback system was developed and evaluated. It analyzed forces at the medial and lateral forefeet, and instantly provided vibration clues when the plantar force at medial forefoot was less than a threshold. Each subject’s three-dimensional gait parameters and plantar-pressure distribution during walking were measured under two experimental conditions (sequence randomized): with and without the device turned on (Trial-registration number: ChiCTR-IPB-15006530 and HKCTR-1853).

Results: Providing biofeedback significantly reduced the foot inversion and increased the mid-stance foot–floor contact area and medial midfoot plantar pressure of the affected limb, bringing the values of these parameters closer to those of the unaffected side. The biofeedback also significantly reduced the unaffected side’s excessive knee flexion and hip abduction.

Conclusions: There were signs of improved foot loading characteristics and gait upon provision of instant vibrotactile biofeedback of plantar force. The positive results of this study further support the development of wearable biofeedback devices for improving gait of patients with stroke. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
foot inversion, gait training, instant biofeedback, plantar pressure, smart wearable device, Stroke, abduction, adult, aged, Article, biofeedback, brain ischemia, cerebrovascular accident, clinical article, controlled study, disease duration, female, forefoot, gait, hemiplegia, human, kinematics, knee function, male, middle aged, stroke patient, varus deformity, walking speed, weight bearing, analysis of variance, complication, drug therapy, electronic device, foot, innervation, locomotion, neurologic gait disorder, outcome assessment, physiology, procedures, stroke rehabilitation, vibration, Biofeedback, Psychology, Gait Disorders, Neurologic, Humans, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Wearable Electronic Devices
National Category
Occupational Therapy Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42467 (URN)10.1080/10749357.2017.1380339 (DOI)000424127300004 ()28950803 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045037257 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Ma, C.-H. Z., Wong, D.-C. W. C., Wan, A.-P. H. P. & Lee, W.-C. C. C. (2018). Effects of orthopedic insoles on static balance of older adults wearing thick socks. Prosthetics and orthotics international, 42(3), 357-362
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of orthopedic insoles on static balance of older adults wearing thick socks
2018 (English)In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 357-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The wearing of socks and insoles may affect the ability of the foot to detect tactile input influencing postural balance.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether (1) thick socks adversely affected the elderly postural balance and (2) orthopedic insoles could improve the elderly postural balance while wearing thick socks.

Study design: Repeated-measures study design. Methods: In total, 14 healthy older adults were recruited. A monofilament test was conducted to evaluate foot plantar sensation with and without thick socks. Subjects then performed the Romberg tests under three conditions: (1) barefoot, (2) with socks only, and (3) with both socks and insoles. Postural balance was assessed by measuring the center of pressure movement during standing in each experimental condition.

Results: Thick socks significantly decreased the monofilament score (p < 0.001), suggesting reduction in ability to detect external forces. All center of pressure parameters increased significantly while wearing thick socks (p < 0.017), implying reduction of postural stability. They then decreased significantly with the additional use of insoles (p < 0.017).

Conclusion: Previous studies have documented the changes in plantar pressure distribution with the use of orthopedic insoles. This study further suggests that such changes in contact mechanics could produce some balance-improving effects, which appears not to have been reported earlier.

Clinical relevance: Wearing thick socks reduces plantar pressure sensitivity and increases postural sway which may increase risk of falls. Orthopedic insoles and footwear with similar design could potentially be a cost-effective method in maintaining postural balance when wearing thick socks. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Balance, center of pressure, elderly, fall, orthopedic insoles, postural stability, aged, Article, biomechanics, body equilibrium, body height, body weight, clinical assessment, experimental test, female, human, male, monofilament test, Romberg test, scoring system, static balance, clothing, epidemiology, falling, foot orthosis, geriatric assessment, normal human, physiology, prevention and control, shoe, utilization, very elderly, Accidental Falls, Aged, 80 and over, Foot Orthoses, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Postural Balance, Sampling Studies, Shoes
National Category
Occupational Therapy Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42466 (URN)10.1177/0309364617752982 (DOI)000432623400016 ()29376482 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042775213 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Ma, C.-H. Z. (2018). Improving balance and gait using biomechanical and electronic approaches. (Doctoral dissertation). Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving balance and gait using biomechanical and electronic approaches
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2018
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42891 (URN)
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-06 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Lam, W.-K., Lee, W.-C. C. C., Lee, W. M., Ma, C.-H. Z. & Kong, P. W. (2018). Segmented forefoot plate in basketball footwear: Does it influence performance and foot joint kinematics and kinetics?. Journal of Applied Biomechanics, 34(1), 31-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Segmented forefoot plate in basketball footwear: Does it influence performance and foot joint kinematics and kinetics?
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Applied Biomechanics, ISSN 1065-8483, E-ISSN 1543-2688, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the effects of shoes' segmented forefoot stiffness on athletic performance and ankle and metatarsophalangeal joint kinematics and kinetics in basketball movements. Seventeen university basketball players performed running vertical jumps and 5-msprints atmaximumeffort with 3 basketball shoes of various forefoot plate conditions (medial plate, medial + lateral plates, and no-plate control). One-way repeated measures ANOVAs were used to examine the differences in athletic performance, joint kinematics, and joint kinetics among the 3 footwear conditions (α = .05). Results indicated that participants wearing medial + lateral plates shoes demonstrated 2.9% higher jump height than those wearing control shoes (P = .02), but there was no significant differences between medial plate and control shoes (P > .05). Medial plate shoes produced greater maximum plantar flexion velocity than the medial + lateral plates shoes (P < .05) during sprinting. There were no significant differences in sprint time. These findings implied that inserting plates spanning both the medial and lateral aspects of the forefoot could enhance jumping, but not sprinting performances. The use of a medial plate alone, although induced greater plantar flexion velocity at the metatarsophalangeal joint during sprinting, was not effective in improving jump heights or sprint times.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2018
Keywords
Ankle joint, Joint moment, Jumping, Metatarsophalangeal joint, Sprinting, Joints (anatomy), Kinematics, Kinetics, Sports, Ankle joints, Metatarsophalangeal joints, Shoe manufacture, adult, ankle, Article, athletic performance, basketball player, controlled study, foot joint, forefoot, ground reaction force, human, male, musculoskeletal function, rigidity, running, basketball, biomechanics, equipment design, physiology, shoe, young adult, Biomechanical Phenomena, Foot Joints, Humans, Shoes
National Category
Occupational Therapy Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42479 (URN)10.1123/jab.2017-0044 (DOI)000429375300005 ()28836881 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042637687 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Ma, C.-H. Z. & Lee, W.-C. C. C. (2017). A wearable vibrotactile biofeedback system improves balance control of healthy young adults following perturbations from quiet stance. Human Movement Science, 55, 54-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A wearable vibrotactile biofeedback system improves balance control of healthy young adults following perturbations from quiet stance
2017 (English)In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 55, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Maintaining postural equilibrium requires fast reactions and constant adjustments of the center of mass (CoM) position to prevent falls, especially when there is a sudden perturbation of the support surface. During this study, a newly developed wearable feedback system provided immediate vibrotactile clues to users based on plantar force measurement, in an attempt to reduce reaction time and CoM displacement in response to a perturbation of the floor. Ten healthy young adults participated in this study. They stood on a support surface, which suddenly moved in one of four horizontal directions (forward, backward, left and right), with the biofeedback system turned on or off. The testing sequence of the four perturbation directions and the two system conditions (turned on or off) was randomized. The resulting reaction time and CoM displacement were analysed. Results showed that the vibrotactile feedback system significantly improved balance control during translational perturbations. The positive results of this preliminary study highlight the potential of a plantar force measurement based biofeedback system in improving balance under perturbations of the support surface. Future system optimizations could facilitate its application in fall prevention in real life conditions, such as standing in buses or trains that suddenly decelerate or accelerate. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Balance, Center of mass displacement, Perturbation, Reaction time, Vibrotactile biofeedback system, Wearable device, adult, biofeedback, clinical article, controlled clinical trial, controlled study, female, human, male, normal human, randomized controlled trial, standing, young adult, ambulatory care, body equilibrium, body position, devices, physiology, procedures, therapeutic use, vibration, Biofeedback, Psychology, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Postural Balance, Posture
National Category
Occupational Therapy Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42468 (URN)10.1016/j.humov.2017.07.006 (DOI)000413390800006 ()28763702 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85026395252 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Elhadi, M. M. O., Ma, C.-H. Z., Wong, D. W. C., Wan, A. H. P. & Lee, W. C. C. (2017). Comprehensive gait analysis of healthy older adults who have undergone long-distance walking. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 25(3), 367-377
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comprehensive gait analysis of healthy older adults who have undergone long-distance walking
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, E-ISSN 1543-267X, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 367-377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many older adults do not adhere to the recommended physical activity levels. This study examines the gait changes upon longdistance walking among healthy older adults. Gait tests of 24 adults aged 65 or more were conducted at baseline and at the end of 30 and 60min of treadmill walking. Spatial temporal, kinematic, and kinetic gait data were computed. Perceived level of exertion was evaluated for each subject. Ten subjects (group B) perceived higher exertion levels than the remaining 14 subjects (group A). After walking, group B had significant reductions in dominant-side ankle joint range of motion and power, suggesting lower-leg muscle fatigue, which appeared to be compensated by significantly increased nondominant-side knee and hip motions. These changes were not observed in group A. Differences in gait parameters between groups A and B implied that some biomechanical factors might contribute to the lack of walking of some older adults. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2017
Keywords
Gait, Long-distance walking, Older adults, Perceived exertion, aged, ankle, biomechanics, exercise, exercise test, female, human, joint characteristics and functions, male, pathophysiology, physiology, procedures, psychology, psychomotor performance, time factor, walking, walking speed, Ankle Joint, Biomechanical Phenomena, Humans, Physical Exertion, Range of Motion, Articular, Time Factors
National Category
Occupational Therapy Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42469 (URN)10.1123/japa.2016-0136 (DOI)000406826700005 ()27834558 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85024867519 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Ma, C.-H. Z., Zheng, Y.-P. & Lee, W.-C. C. (2017). Vibrotactile Wearable Biofeedback System Integrated with Force Sensors at Plantar Foot Could Relieve Foot Varus Deformity in Patients with Stroke. In: : . Paper presented at ISPO’s 16th World Congress (International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vibrotactile Wearable Biofeedback System Integrated with Force Sensors at Plantar Foot Could Relieve Foot Varus Deformity in Patients with Stroke
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUNDPlantar sensory input is a crucial component of proprioceptive system, which is important for maintaining balance and gait control. Foot orthoses are traditionally prescribed to correct/compensate foot deformity and relieve foot pain in patients. Adding some electronic components at insoles to capture the plantar force information and providing corresponding feedback information could compensate sensory loss in patients and amputees [1-3], this may further be applied to help improve lower limb motor control.AIMTo investigate the effect of instant biofeedback of plantar pressure distribution at medial and lateral forefoot on alteration of foot inversion and push-off forces during stance phrase in patients with hemiplegic stroke.METHODThis study was conducted in a university locomotion laboratory. Convenience sampling approach was adopted to recruit 8 patients with hemiplegic stroke (7M+1F, age 54±10 years, height 175±6 cm, weight 72±11 kg) in this study. All participants walked with visible foot inversion and seven of them walked with visible foot plantarflexion in swing phrase. The foot inversion and plantarflexion deformities were flexible and can be corrected by external forces.A vibrotactile biofeedback system was developed and evaluated, which integrated two force sensors at plantar surface of foot in a pair of flat insoles measuring the plantar forces at medial and lateral forefoot, and wirelessly sent instant control signals to one vibrator at wrist when the magnitude of detected plantar force at medial-side forefoot was lower than 50% of the lateral-side’s.A three-dimensional motion capture system (3D) motion capture system (Vicon Nexus 1.8.1, Vicon NexusTM, Vicon Motion Systems Ltd., UK) and an in-shoe plantar pressure measurement system (novel pedar-x system, PedarTM, novel GmbH, Munich, DE) were used to measure each subject’s spatial-temporal gait parameters and plantar pressure distribution during walking in each of the two experimental conditions with randomized sequences: 1) with biofeedback system turned-off, and 2) with biofeedback system turned-on.RESULTSUpon turning on the biofeedback system, the medial-side plantar pressure at both forefoot and midfoot of the affected limb increased significantly and became close to that of the sound limb, while the plantar pressure at rearfoot and lateral-side midfoot of the affected limb decreased significantly in subjects (Figure 1, p<0.05). The subjects adjusted their gait pattern by significantly decreasing the foot external rotation and hip flexion, and increasing the pelvic backward rotation of both limbs during stance phrase (p<0.05). Although no significant difference was found, subject’s affected limb also revealed notable reduction of foot inversion in stance phrase and increase of plantar-flexion in terminal stance phrase during walking upon using the device.

DISCUSSION & CONCLUSIONInstant vibrotactile biofeedback of plantar pressure distribution at medial and lateral forefoot helps relieve the foot inversion, facilitate initiation of swing phrase, and additionally increase weight-bearing symmetry in stance phrase during walking in patients with stroke. The positive results of this study shed new lights on future research of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback system for improving gait in people with impaired lower-limb motor control. It further allows the targeted gait training and improvement of motor control to be conducted in both indoor and outdoor environments.

National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42865 (URN)
Conference
ISPO’s 16th World Congress (International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics)
Available from: 2019-02-05 Created: 2019-02-05 Last updated: 2019-02-28
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6507-2329

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