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Womack, S. R., Beam, C. R., Giangrande, E. J., Tong, X., Scharf, R. J., Finkel, D., . . . Turkheimer, E. (2024). Co-recovery of physical size and cognitive ability from infancy to adolescence: A twin study. Child Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-recovery of physical size and cognitive ability from infancy to adolescence: A twin study
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2024 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study tested phenotypic and biometric associations between physical and cognitive catch-up growth in a community sample of twins (n = 1285, 51.8% female, 89.3% White). Height and weight were measured at up to 17 time points between birth and 15 years, and cognitive ability was assessed at up to 16 time points between 3 months and 15 years. Weight and length at birth were positively associated with cognitive abilities in infancy and adolescence (r's =.16–.51). More rapid weight catch-up growth was associated with slower, steadier cognitive catch-up growth. Shared and nonshared environmental factors accounted for positive associations between physical size at birth and cognitive outcomes. Findings highlight the role of prenatal environmental experiences in physical and cognitive co-development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63642 (URN)10.1111/cdev.14079 (DOI)001154724300001 ()38303087 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85184161750 (Scopus ID)HOA;;938519 (Local ID)HOA;;938519 (Archive number)HOA;;938519 (OAI)
Available from: 2024-02-20 Created: 2024-02-20 Last updated: 2024-02-20
Finkel, D., Nilsen, C., Sindi, S. & Kåreholt, I. (2024). Impact of childhood and adult socioeconomic position on change in functional aging. Health Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of childhood and adult socioeconomic position on change in functional aging
2024 (English)In: Health Psychology, ISSN 0278-6133, E-ISSN 1930-7810Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To examine life-course models by investigating the roles of childhood and adult socioeconomic position (SEP) in longitudinal changes in a functional aging index.

METHOD: Up to eight waves of testing, covering 25 years, were available from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging: N = 654, intake age = 50-82. A two-slope latent growth curve model was applied to the data, and the impact of including childhood and adult SEP as covariates of the intercept (at age 70) and slopes (before and after age 70) was tested.

RESULTS: Both childhood and adult SEP contributed to the best-fitting model. Childhood SEP was significantly associated with intercept and Slope 1 (before age 70) of the latent growth curve model (p < .05). Association of adult SEP with Slope 2 (after age 70) trended toward significance (p < .10). There was a significant interaction effect of childhood and adult SEP on the intercept (p < .05). As a result, intercept at age 70 was highest and change after age 70 was fastest for those whose SEP decreased from childhood to adulthood.

CONCLUSIONS: Both childhood and adult SEP impact change in functional abilities with age, supporting both critical period and social mobility models. The social environment is modifiable by policies at local, national, and international levels, and these policies need to recognize that early social disadvantage can have long-lasting health impacts. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2024
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63386 (URN)10.1037/hea0001356 (DOI)001137077200001 ()38190203 (PubMedID);intsam;928824 (Local ID);intsam;928824 (Archive number);intsam;928824 (OAI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 97:0147:1B, 2009-0795Swedish Research Council, 825-2007-7460, 825-2009-6141Axel and Margaret Ax:son Johnson FoundationVårdal FoundationRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2024-01-17 Created: 2024-01-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Ler, P., Ploner, A., Finkel, D., Reynolds, C. A., Zhan, Y., Jylhava, J., . . . Karlsson, I. K. (2024). Interplay of body mass index and metabolic syndrome: association with physiological age from midlife to late-life. GeroScience, 46, 2605-2617
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interplay of body mass index and metabolic syndrome: association with physiological age from midlife to late-life
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2024 (English)In: GeroScience, ISSN 2509-2715, Vol. 46, p. 2605-2617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) share common pathophysiological characteristics with aging. To better understand their interplay, we examined how body mass index (BMI) and MetS jointly associate with physiological age, and if the associations changed from midlife to late-life. We used longitudinal data from 1,825 Swedish twins. Physiological age was measured as frailty index (FI) and functional aging index (FAI) and modeled independently in linear mixed-effects models adjusted for chronological age, sex, education, and smoking. We assessed curvilinear associations of BMI and chronological age with physiological age, and interactions between BMI, MetS, and chronological age. We found a significant three-way interaction between BMI, MetS, and chronological age on FI (p-interaction = 0<middle dot>006), not FAI. Consequently, we stratified FI analyses by age: < 65, 65-85, and >= 85 years, and modeled FAI across ages. Except for FI at ages >= 85, BMI had U-shaped associations with FI and FAI, where BMI around 26-28 kg/m(2) was associated with the lowest physiological age. MetS was associated with higher FI and FAI, except for FI at ages < 65, and modified the BMI-FI association at ages 65-85 (p-interaction = 0<middle dot>02), whereby the association between higher BMI levels and FI was stronger in individuals with MetS. Age modified the MetS-FI association in ages >= 85, such that it was stronger at higher ages (p-interaction = 0<middle dot>01). Low BMI, high BMI, and metabolic syndrome were associated with higher physiological age, contributing to overall health status among older individuals and potentially accelerating aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2024
Keywords
Biological age, Frailty index, Metabolic syndrome, Metabolic health, Obesity
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63221 (URN)10.1007/s11357-023-01032-9 (DOI)001126625000002 ()38102440 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85179665831 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;924951 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;924951 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;924951 (OAI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2021-00180Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2024-01-08 Created: 2024-01-08 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Ler, P., Ojalehto, E., Zhan, Y., Finkel, D., Dahl Aslan, A. K. & Karlsson, I. K. (2023). Conversions between metabolically unhealthy and healthy obesity from midlife to late-life. International Journal of Obesity
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conversions between metabolically unhealthy and healthy obesity from midlife to late-life
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Metabolically healthy obesity may be a transient phenotype, but studies with long follow-up, especially covering late-life, are lacking. We describe conversions between cross-categories of body mass index (BMI) and metabolic health in 786 Swedish twins with up to 27 years of follow-up, from midlife to late-life.

Methods: Metabolic health was defined as the absence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). We first visualized conversions between BMI-metabolic health phenotypes in 100 individuals with measurements available at ages 50–64, 65–79, and ≥80. Next, we modeled conversion in metabolic health status by BMI category in the full sample using Cox proportional hazards regression.

Results: The proportion of individuals with MetS and with overweight or obesity increased with age. However, one-fifth maintained a metabolically healthy overweight or obesity across all three age categories. Among those metabolically healthy at baseline, 59% converted to MetS during follow-up. Conversions occurred 56% more often among individuals with metabolically healthy obesity, but not overweight, compared to normal weight. Among those with MetS at baseline, 60% regained metabolic health during follow-up, with no difference between BMI categories.

Conclusions: Conversions between metabolically healthy and unhealthy status occurred in both directions in all BMI categories. While conversions to MetS were more common among individuals with obesity, many individuals maintained or regained metabolic health during follow-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63035 (URN)10.1038/s41366-023-01425-y (DOI)001112290100002 ()38042933 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178490780 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;920215 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;920215 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;920215 (OAI)
Funder
NIH (National Institutes of Health), AG04563, AG059329, AG10175, R01 AG060470Swedish Research Council, 2016-03081Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2018-01201, 2022-00672
Available from: 2023-12-11 Created: 2023-12-11 Last updated: 2024-01-15
Ojalehto, E., Finkel, D., Russ, T. C., Karlsson, I. K. & Ericsson, M. (2023). Influences of genetically predicted and attained education on geographic mobility and their association with mortality. Social Science and Medicine, 324, Article ID 115882.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influences of genetically predicted and attained education on geographic mobility and their association with mortality
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2023 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 324, article id 115882Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Both educational attainment and genetic propensity to education (PGSEdu) have been associated with geographic mobility. Socioeconomic conditions are, in turn, associated with individuals’ health. Geographic mobility could therefore lead to better health for some since it could provide better opportunities, like education. Our aim was to study how attained education and genetic predisposition for higher education are related to geographic mobility, and how they affect the association between geographic mobility and mortality. Methods: We used data from the Swedish Twin Registry (twins born 1926–1955; n = 14,211) in logistic regression models to test if attained education and PGSEdu predicted geographic mobility. Cox regression models were then performed to test if geographic mobility, attained education, and PGSEdu were associated with mortality. Results: The results show that both attained education and PGSEdu predicted geographic mobility, in both independent and joint effect models, with higher education associated with higher mobility. Geographic mobility was associated with lower mortality in the independent effect model, but joint effect models showed that this association was completely explained by attained education. Conclusions: To conclude, both attained education and PGSEdu were associated with geographic mobility. Moreover, attained education explained the relationship between geographic mobility and mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
adult, article, education, educational status, genetic risk score, human, human experiment, major clinical study, mortality, social status, tertiary education, Attained education, Geographic mobility, Polygenic score, Socioeconomic status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60153 (URN)10.1016/j.socscimed.2023.115882 (DOI)000975172700001 ()37030096 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151519861 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;875670 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;875670 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;875670 (OAI)
Funder
NIH (National Institutes of Health), R01 AG059329, R01 AG060470Swedish Research Council, 2017-00641
Available from: 2023-04-17 Created: 2023-04-17 Last updated: 2023-05-15Bibliographically approved
Finkel, D. & Jaffee, S. R. (2023). Introduction to IDEA Special Issue. Behavior Genetics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction to IDEA Special Issue
2023 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
National Category
Psychology Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63190 (URN)10.1007/s10519-023-10173-8 (DOI)38148347 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180714728 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-04 Created: 2024-01-04 Last updated: 2024-01-10
Phillips, D. M., Finkel, D., Petkus, A. J., Muñoz, E., Pahlen, S., Johnson, W., . . . Pedersen, N. (2023). Longitudinal analyses indicate bidirectional associations between loneliness and health. Aging & Mental Health, 27(6), 1217-1225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal analyses indicate bidirectional associations between loneliness and health
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2023 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1217-1225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To evaluate temporal dynamics between loneliness and both objective and subjective health (i.e. functional impairment and self-rated health) in mid- to late-adulthood.

Method: We applied bivariate dual-change-score models to longitudinal data from 3 Swedish twin studies (N = 1,939) to explore dynamic associations between loneliness and health across 3 age ranges (50–69, 70–81, and 82+ years) to investigate whether associations between loneliness and health change with age due to increasing incidence of chronic health conditions and bereavement.

Results: Results showed bidirectional associations between loneliness and both objective and subjective health, with adverse impacts of loneliness observed on subsequent subjective and objective health beginning at age 70. Associations between health and subsequent loneliness were observed after age 82 and varied for subjective and objective health, with subjective health associated with less loneliness and objective health associated with greater loneliness.

Conclusions: Our results indicate dynamic associations between loneliness and health with age in mid- to late-adulthood, with earlier impacts of loneliness on health and later impacts of health on loneliness that vary for objective and subjective measures of health. These findings suggest impacts of health on loneliness may arise later in life when worsening health or mobility interfere with social interaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
age-based analysis, aging, dual-change-score model, dynamic associations, functional impairment, Loneliness, self-rated health
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-57488 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2022.2087210 (DOI)000811127200001 ()35699236 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85131808576 (Scopus ID);intsam;1673901 (Local ID);intsam;1673901 (Archive number);intsam;1673901 (OAI)
Funder
Axel and Margaret Ax:son Johnson FoundationVårdal FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2022-06-21 Created: 2022-06-21 Last updated: 2023-09-07Bibliographically approved
Tang, B., Li, X., Wang, Y., Sjölander, A., Johnell, K., Thambisetty, M., . . . Hägg, S. (2023). Longitudinal associations between use of antihypertensive, antidiabetic, and lipid-lowering medications and biological aging. GeroScience, 45, 2065-2078
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal associations between use of antihypertensive, antidiabetic, and lipid-lowering medications and biological aging
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2023 (English)In: GeroScience, ISSN 2509-2715, Vol. 45, p. 2065-2078Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aging is a major risk factor for many chronic diseases. This study aimed to examine the effects of antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and antidiabetic drugs on biological aging. We included 672 participants and 2746 repeated measurements from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. Self-reported medicine uses were categorized into antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and lipid-lowering drugs. A total of 12 biomarkers for biological aging (BA biomarkers) were included as outcomes. Conditional generalized estimating equations were applied conditioning on individuals to estimate the drug effect on BA biomarker level within the same person when using or not using the drug. Chronological age, body mass index, smoking status, number of multiple medication uses, blood pressure, blood glucose level, and apoB/apoA ratio were adjusted for as covariates in the model. Overall, using antihypertensive drugs was associated with a decrease in one DNA-methylation age (PCGrimAge: beta = − 0.39, 95%CI = − 0.67 to − 0.12). When looking into drug subcategories, calcium channel blockers (CCBs) were associated with a decrease in several DNA-methylation ages (PCHorvathAge beta = − 1.28, 95%CI = − 2.34 to − 0.21; PCSkin&bloodAge beta = − 1.34, 95%CI = − 2.61 to − 0.07; PCPhenoAge beta = − 1.74, 95%CI = − 2.58 to − 0.89; PCGrimAge beta = − 0.57, 95%CI = − 0.96 to − 0.17) and in functional biological ages (functional age index beta = − 2.18, 95%CI = − 3.65 to − 0.71; frailty index beta = − 1.31, 95%CI = − 2.43 to − 0.18). However, the results within other drug subcategories were inconsistent. Calcium channel blockers may decrease biological aging captured by the BA biomarkers measured at epigenetic and functional level. Future studies are warranted to confirm these effects and understand the underlying biological mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Antidiabetic, Antihypertensive, Biomarkers of biological aging, Lipid-lowering medications
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60165 (URN)10.1007/s11357-023-00784-8 (DOI)000966508900001 ()37032369 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85152127319 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;875760 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;875760 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;875760 (OAI)
Funder
NIH (National Institutes of Health), AG028555, AG10175, R01 AG04563Swedish Research Council, 2013-2292, 2015-03255, 2018-02077, 2019-01272, 2022-01608, 521-2013-8689, 825-2007-7460, 825-2009- 6141, R01AG067996Konung Gustaf V:s och Drottning Victorias FrimurarestiftelseMagnus Bergvall FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-0795, 97:0147:1B
Available from: 2023-04-17 Created: 2023-04-17 Last updated: 2023-08-29Bibliographically approved
Luczak, S. E., Beam, C. R., Pahlen, S., Lynch, M., Pilgrim, M., Reynolds, C. A., . . . Gatz, M. (2023). Remember this: Age moderation of genetic and environmental contributions to verbal episodic memory from midlife through late adulthood. Intelligence, 99, Article ID 101759.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remember this: Age moderation of genetic and environmental contributions to verbal episodic memory from midlife through late adulthood
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2023 (English)In: Intelligence, ISSN 0160-2896, E-ISSN 1873-7935, Vol. 99, article id 101759Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well documented that memory is heritable and that older adults tend to have poorer memory performance than younger adults. However, whether the magnitudes of genetic and environmental contributions to late-life verbal episodic memory ability differ from those at earlier ages remains unresolved. Twins from 12 studies participating in the Interplay of Genes and Environment in Multiple Studies (IGEMS) consortium constituted the analytic sample. Verbal episodic memory was assessed with immediate word list recall (N = 35,204 individuals; 21,792 twin pairs) and prose recall (N = 3805 individuals; 2028 twin pairs), with scores harmonized across studies. Average test performance was lower in successively older age groups for both measures. Twin models found significant age moderation for both measures, with total inter-individual variance increasing significantly with age, although it was not possible definitively to attribute the increase specifically to either genetic or environmental sources. Pooled results across all 12 studies were compared to results where we successively dropped each study (leave-one-out) to assure results were not due to an outlier. We conclude the models indicated an overall increase in variance for verbal episodic memory that was driven by a combination of increases in the genetic and nonshared environmental parameters that were not independently statistically significant. In contrast to reported results for other cognitive domains, differences in environmental exposures are comparatively important for verbal episodic memory, especially word list learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Aging, Twin studies, Verbal episodic memory
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60330 (URN)10.1016/j.intell.2023.101759 (DOI)000998962100001 ()37389150 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85154603400 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Axel and Margaret Ax:son Johnson FoundationNIH (National Institutes of Health)Vårdal FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-05-08 Created: 2023-05-08 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Finkel, D., Johansson, L., Westerlind, B., Lindmark, U. & Ernsth-Bravell, M. (2022). AGE AND SITE DIFFERENCES IN PLANNED AND PERFORMED ACTIONS IN RESPONSE TO IDENTIFIED RISKS IN OLDER ADULTS. Innovation in Aging, 6(Supplement 1), 840-840
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AGE AND SITE DIFFERENCES IN PLANNED AND PERFORMED ACTIONS IN RESPONSE TO IDENTIFIED RISKS IN OLDER ADULTS
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2022 (English)In: Innovation in Aging, E-ISSN 2399-5300, Vol. 6, no Supplement 1, p. 840-840Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The Swedish health care system focuses on allowing older adults to “age in place”; however, that approach assumes that home health services are adequate to support health and prevent unnecessary decline. Data from the Senior Alert national quality register in Sweden were examined to compare the quality of care across care locations. First registration in Senior Alert was available for 2914 adults aged 57–109 (median age = 81): 3.6% dementia unit, 7.8% home health care, 4.4% rehabilitation unit, 62.8% hospital, 21.4% care home. There were significant differences across units in the number of identified risks in 4 categories: falls, malnutrition, oral health, and pressure ulcer. Individuals in rehabilitation units averaged 2.4 risks, individuals in dementia and care homes averaged 2.0 risks, and individuals in home health care and hospitals averaged 1.4 risks. For individuals with identified risks, the differences between planned and performed actions for each risk independently were greatest for those in home health care. Moreover, the correlation between total planned and performed actions in home health care was .79 for adults aged 65–80 years and .39 for adults aged 81 and over. The correlation did not differ across age for the other care units. Results suggest that individuals most in need of actions to address health risks (older adults in home health care) are least likely to have the actions performed. Training and support of workers responsible for home health care need to be improved if the “age in place” policy is to continue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60008 (URN)10.1093/geroni/igac059.3012 (DOI)000913044004187 ()
Available from: 2023-03-21 Created: 2023-03-21 Last updated: 2023-03-21Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2346-2470

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