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Finkel, D. & Ernsth-Bravell, M. (2020). Cohort by Education Interactions in Longitudinal Changes in Functional Abilities. Journal of Aging and Health, 32(3-4), 208-215, Article ID 898264318814108.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cohort by Education Interactions in Longitudinal Changes in Functional Abilities
2020 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 32, no 3-4, p. 208-215, article id 898264318814108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Investigations of cohort differences in relationships between education and health tend to focus on mortality or self-reported health. We report one of the first analyses of cohort differences in relationships between education and objective measures of functional abilities across the lifespan.

METHOD: Up to 26 years of follow-up data were available from 859 adults from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. The sample was divided into two cohorts by birth year: 1900-1924 and 1925-1948. Latent growth curve models (LGCM) were compared across cohort and educational levels.

RESULTS: LGCM indicated divergence between adults with lower and higher educational attainment in longitudinal trajectories of change with age in the Balance and Flexibility factors for the later born cohort only.

DISCUSSION: Results support the cumulative advantage theory and suggest that education-health disparities are increasing in recent cohorts, even in counties with national health care systems and strong support of education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
cohort differences, cumulative advantage, health disparities, latent growth curve models
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42147 (URN)10.1177/0898264318814108 (DOI)000511806500009 ()30466342 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059351792 (Scopus ID);HHJARNIS (Local ID);HHJARNIS (Archive number);HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Li, X., Ploner, A., Wang, Y., Magnusson, P. K., Reynolds, C., Finkel, D., . . . Hägg, S. (2020). Longitudinal trajectories, correlations and mortality associations of nine biological ages across 20-years follow-up.. eLIFE, 9, Article ID e51507.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal trajectories, correlations and mortality associations of nine biological ages across 20-years follow-up.
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2020 (English)In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 9, article id e51507Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biological age measurements (BAs) assess aging-related physiological change and predict health risks among individuals of the same chronological age (CA). Multiple BAs have been proposed and are well studied individually but not jointly. We included 845 individuals and 3973 repeated measurements from a Swedish population-based cohort and examined longitudinal trajectories, correlations, and mortality associations of nine BAs across 20 years follow-up. We found the longitudinal growth of functional BAs accelerated around age 70; average levels of BA curves differed by sex across the age span (50-90 years). All BAs were correlated to varying degrees; correlations were mostly explained by CA. Individually, all BAs except for telomere length were associated with mortality risk independently of CA. The largest effects were seen for methylation age estimators (GrimAge) and the frailty index (FI). In joint models, two methylation age estimators (Horvath and GrimAge) and FI remained predictive, suggesting they are complementary in predicting mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
eLife Sciences Publications, 2020
Keywords
aging, biological age, correlation, epidemiology, global health, human, longitudinal trajectory, mortality
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47990 (URN)10.7554/eLife.51507 (DOI)000514103700001 ()32041686 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079222300 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2020;HHJARNIS (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2020;HHJARNIS (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2020;HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-18 Created: 2020-03-18 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved
Finkel, D., Franz, C. E., Christensen, K., Reynolds, C. A. & Pedersen, N. L. (2020). Longitudinal twin study of subjective health: Differences in genetic and environmental components of variance across age and sex. The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, 75(1), 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal twin study of subjective health: Differences in genetic and environmental components of variance across age and sex
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2020 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The current analysis examines sex differences in longitudinal changes in genetic and environmental influences on three measures of subjective health.

Method: Sample includes 7372 twins (mean intake age = 73.22) with up to 8 waves of measurement (mean = 3.1). Three subjective health (SH) items were included: general self-rated health (SRH), health compared to age peers (COMP), and impact of health on activities (ACT) which previous research shows capture different frames of reference.

Results: Latent growth curve modeling indicated significant differences across gender and frame of reference in trajectories of change with age and in genetic and environmental contributions to change. Men have higher mean scores on all three SH measures, indicating better SH, but there were no sex differences in pattern of change with age. Accelerating declines with age were found for SRH and ACT, whereas COMP improved with age. Results indicated more genetic variance for women than men, but declining genetic variance for both after age 70. Increasing shared environmental variance with increasing age was also found for both sexes.

Discussion: As aging triggers a re-evaluation of the meaning of "good health," physical aspects of health may become less important and shared cultural conceptions of health may become more relevant. This change in conceptions of good health may reflect both aging and the change in composition of the elderly population as a result of selective survival.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2020
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43119 (URN)10.1093/geronb/gby030 (DOI)29590493 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076441728 (Scopus ID)KOA HHJ 2020;HHJARNIS (Local ID)KOA HHJ 2020;HHJARNIS (Archive number)KOA HHJ 2020;HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2020-01-02Bibliographically approved
Beam, C. R., Turkheimer, E., Finkel, D., Levine, M. E., Zandi, E., Guterbock, T. M., . . . Davis, D. W. (2020). Midlife study of the Louisville Twins: Connecting cognitive development to biological and cognitive aging. Behavior Genetics, 50(2), 73-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Midlife study of the Louisville Twins: Connecting cognitive development to biological and cognitive aging
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2020 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Louisville Twin Study (LTS) began in 1958 and became a premier longitudinal twin study of cognitive development. The LTS continuously collected data from twins through 2000 after which the study closed indefinitely due to lack of funding. Now that the majority of the sample is age 40 or older (61.36%, N = 1770), the LTS childhood data can be linked to midlife cognitive functioning, among other physical, biological, social, and psychiatric outcomes. We report results from two pilot studies in anticipation of beginning the midlife phase of the LTS. The first pilot study was a participant tracking study, in which we showed that approximately 90% of the Louisville families randomly sampled (N = 203) for the study could be found. The second pilot study consisted of 40 in-person interviews in which twins completed cognitive, memory, biometric, and functional ability measures. The main purpose of the second study was to correlate midlife measures of cognitive functioning to a measure of biological age, which is an alternative index to chronological age that quantifies age as a function of the breakdown of structural and functional physiological systems, and then to relate both of these measures to twins’ cognitive developmental trajectories. Midlife IQ was uncorrelated with biological age (−.01) while better scores on episodic memory more strongly correlated with lower biological age (−.19 to −.31). As expected, midlife IQ positively correlated with IQ measures collected throughout childhood and adolescence. Additionally, positive linear rates of change in FSIQ scores in childhood significantly correlated with biological age (−.68), physical functioning (.71), and functional ability (−.55), suggesting that cognitive development predicts lower biological age, better physical functioning, and better functional ability. In sum, the Louisville twins can be relocated to investigate whether and how early and midlife cognitive and physical health factors contribute to cognitive aging. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Aging, Cognitive ability, Developmental behavioral genetics, Louisville Twin Study
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47220 (URN)10.1007/s10519-019-09983-6 (DOI)000514795400001 ()31820295 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076776263 (Scopus ID);HHJARNIS (Local ID);HHJARNIS (Archive number);HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-03-05Bibliographically approved
Finkel, D., Ernsth-Bravell, M. & Pedersen, N. L. (2020). Role of motor function and lung function in pathways to ageing and decline. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of motor function and lung function in pathways to ageing and decline
2020 (English)In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background

Extensive research has investigated the association between age changes in various domains, including lung function and motor function. However, a few analyses have tested models that incorporate bidirectional longitudinal influences between lung and motor function to test the temporal chain of events in the disability process. Dual change score models (DCSM) assist with identification of leading indicators of change by leveraging longitudinal data to examine the extent to which changes in one variable influence subsequent changes in a second variable, and vice versa.

Aims

The purpose of the current-analysis study was to apply DCSM to data from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of ageing to examine the nature of the longitudinal relationship between motor functioning and lung function.

Methods

Three motor functioning factors were created from 20 performance measures, including measures of balance, flexibility, and fine motor skills. Peak expiratory flow measured lung function. Participants were 829 adults aged 50–88 at the first of 9 waves of testing covering a 27-year follow-up period; 80% participated in at least three waves.

Results

Model comparisons indicated that decline in lung function preceded and contributed to subsequent decline in motor function.

Discussion

Combined with previous results, these results suggest that declining lung function results in increasing difficulties in motor function, which contribute to subsequent declines in multiple domains.

Conclusion

Understanding the cascade of events that can lead to dependence can help in the development of interventions targeted early in the disablement process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Lung function, Motor function, Physical function, Longitudinal, Ageing, Disablement
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47803 (URN)10.1007/s40520-020-01494-3 (DOI)32056153 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079437628 (Scopus ID);HHJARNIS (Local ID);HHJARNIS (Archive number);HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-17 Created: 2020-02-17 Last updated: 2020-02-26
Zammit, A. R., Piccinin, A. M., Duggan, E. C., Koval, A., Clouston, S., Robitaille, A., . . . Hofer, S. M. (2019). A coordinated multi-study analysis of the longitudinal association between handgrip strength and cognitive function in older adults.. The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, Article ID gbz072.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A coordinated multi-study analysis of the longitudinal association between handgrip strength and cognitive function in older adults.
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2019 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, article id gbz072Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Handgrip strength, an indicator of overall muscle strength, has been found to be associated with slower rate of cognitive decline and decreased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia. However, evaluating the replicability of associations between aging-related changes in physical and cognitive functioning is challenging due to differences in study designs and analytical models. A multiple-study coordinated analysis approach was used to generate new longitudinal results based on comparable construct-level measurements and identical statistical models and to facilitate replication and research synthesis.

METHODS: We performed coordinated analysis on nine cohort studies affiliated with the Integrative Analysis of Longitudinal Studies of Aging and Dementia (IALSA) research network. Bivariate linear mixed models were used to examine associations among individual differences in baseline level, rate of change, and occasion-specific variation across grip strength and indicators of cognitive function, including mental status, processing speed, attention and working memory, perceptual reasoning, verbal ability, and learning and memory. Results were summarized using meta-analysis.

RESULTS: After adjustment for covariates, we found an overall moderate association between change in grip strength and change in each cognitive domain for both males and females: Average correlation coefficient was 0.55 (95% CI = 0.44 - 0.56). We also found a high level of heterogeneity in this association across studies.

DISCUSSION: Meta-analytic results from nine longitudinal studies showed consistently positive associations between linear rates of change in grip strength and changes in cognitive functioning. Future work will benefit from the examination of individual patterns of change to understand the heterogeneity in rates of aging and health-related changes across physical and cognitive biomarkers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
cognitive function, coordinated analysis, grip strength, harmonization, integrative data analysis, longitudinal studies
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47339 (URN)10.1093/geronb/gbz072 (DOI)31187137 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-13 Created: 2020-01-13 Last updated: 2020-01-13
Duggan, E. C., Piccinin, A. M., Clouston, S., Koval, A. V., Robitaille, A., Zammit, A. R., . . . Hofer, S. M. (2019). A multi-study coordinated meta-analysis of pulmonary function and cognition in aging. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 74(11), 1793-1804
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multi-study coordinated meta-analysis of pulmonary function and cognition in aging
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2019 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 74, no 11, p. 1793-1804Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Substantial research is dedicated to understanding the aging-related dynamics among individual differences in level, change, and variation across physical and cognitive abilities. Evaluating replicability and synthesizing these findings has been limited by differences in measurements and samples, and by study design and statistical analyses confounding between-person differences with within-person changes. In this paper, we conducted a coordinated analysis and summary meta-analysis of new results on the aging-related dynamics linking pulmonary function and cognitive performance.

METHODS: We performed coordinated analysis of bivariate growth models in data from 20,586 participants across eight longitudinal studies to examine individual differences in baseline level, rate of change, and occasion-specific variability in pulmonary and cognitive functioning. Results were summarized using meta-analysis.

RESULTS: We found consistent but weak baseline and longitudinal associations in levels of pulmonary and cognitive functioning, but no associations in occasion-specific variability.

CONCLUSIONS: Results provide limited evidence for a consistent link between simultaneous changes in pulmonary and cognitive function in a normal aging population. Further research is required to understand patterns of onset of decline and differences in rates of change within and across physical and cognitive functioning domains, both within-individuals and across countries and birth cohorts. Coordinated analysis provides an efficient and rigorous approach for replicating and comparing results across independent longitudinal studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
cognition, cognitive aging, longitudinal analysis, normative aging, pulmonary
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43627 (URN)10.1093/gerona/glz057 (DOI)000491242600014 ()30825374 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072942783 (Scopus ID);HHJARNIS (Local ID);HHJARNIS (Archive number);HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Finkel, D. & Ernsth-Bravell, M. (2019). Age changes in lung function precede and contribute to subsequent age changes in motor function and cognition. In: : . Paper presented at International Conference of Psychological Science, 7-9 March 2019, Paris, France.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age changes in lung function precede and contribute to subsequent age changes in motor function and cognition
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43624 (URN)
Conference
International Conference of Psychological Science, 7-9 March 2019, Paris, France
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Finkel, D. & Schwartz, E. (2019). Diversity of day-to-day emotional experiences and social interactions. In: : . Paper presented at International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics European Region Congress 2019, 23rd – 25th May 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diversity of day-to-day emotional experiences and social interactions
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43752 (URN)
Conference
International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics European Region Congress 2019, 23rd – 25th May 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Jylhävä, J., Raymond, E., Reynolds, C., Finkel, D., Ericsson, M., Dahl Aslan, A. K., . . . Pedersen, N. (2019). Drivers of frailty from adulthood into old age: Results from a 27-year longitudinal population-based study in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics European Region Congress 2019, 23rd – 25th May 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drivers of frailty from adulthood into old age: Results from a 27-year longitudinal population-based study in Sweden
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43737 (URN)
Conference
International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics European Region Congress 2019, 23rd – 25th May 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2346-2470

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