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Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Waite, S. & Waters, P. (2020). Mobilising research methods: Sensory approaches to outdoor and experiential learning research. In: B. Humberstone & H. Prince (Ed.), Research methods in outdoor studies: . Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobilising research methods: Sensory approaches to outdoor and experiential learning research
2020 (English)In: Research methods in outdoor studies / [ed] B. Humberstone & H. Prince, Abingdon: Routledge, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2020
Series
Routledge Advances in Outdoor Studies
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46814 (URN)9780367188702 (ISBN)9780367188832 (ISBN)9780429199004 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Waite, S., Hedges, C. & Loynes, C. (2020). Research hubs: The theory-practice nexus. In: B. Humberstone & H. Prince (Ed.), Research methods in outdoor studies: . Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research hubs: The theory-practice nexus
2020 (English)In: Research methods in outdoor studies / [ed] B. Humberstone & H. Prince, Abingdon: Routledge, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2020
Series
Routledge Advances in Outdoor Studies
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46847 (URN)9780367188702 (ISBN)9780367188832 (ISBN)9780429199004 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-11-18 Created: 2019-11-18 Last updated: 2019-11-18Bibliographically approved
Goodenough, A. & Waite, S. (2020). Wellbeing from woodland: A critical exploration of links between trees and human health. Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wellbeing from woodland: A critical exploration of links between trees and human health
2020 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This book provides a framework for understanding the components of woodland wellbeing. Based around the collaborative project, Good from Woods, the book spotlights multiple case studies to explore how wellbeing and health are promoted in woodland settings and through woodland inspired activity.  It illustrates forms of wellbeing through real examples of woodland practice and draws out implications for the design of programmes to support health and wellbeing across different client groups. Chapters discuss health and wellbeing from a variety of perspectives such as psychological, physical, social, emotional and biophilic wellbeing.

The book will be of great practical use to commissioners, providers and users of woodland based activity who want to take a deeper look into how trees, woods and forests support human health and happiness, as well as of interest to academics and students engaged in research in outdoor activities, urban forestry and natural health and wellbeing. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2020. p. 262
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46800 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-32629-6 (DOI)978-3-030-32628-9 (ISBN)978-3-030-32629-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-11-11 Created: 2019-11-11 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved
Morgan, A. & Waite, S. (2019). Getting naturally connected: Nurturing children’s affinity to Nature. In: : . Paper presented at Nurturing Affinity to Nature through Outdoor Learning (NANOL), Seminar 12 June 2019, Espoo, Finland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Getting naturally connected: Nurturing children’s affinity to Nature
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46848 (URN)
Conference
Nurturing Affinity to Nature through Outdoor Learning (NANOL), Seminar 12 June 2019, Espoo, Finland
Note

Keynote speech.

Available from: 2019-11-18 Created: 2019-11-18 Last updated: 2019-11-18Bibliographically approved
Waite, S. & Quay, J. (2019). In Place(s): dwelling on culture, materiality and affect. In: A. Cutter-Mackenzie, K. Malone, E. Barratt Hacking (Ed.), Research handbook on childhood nature: Assemblages of childhood and nature research. Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In Place(s): dwelling on culture, materiality and affect
2019 (English)In: Research handbook on childhood nature: Assemblages of childhood and nature research / [ed] A. Cutter-Mackenzie, K. Malone, E. Barratt Hacking, Cham: Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2019
Series
Springer International Handbooks of Education, ISSN 2197-1951
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41857 (URN)978-3-319-67287-8 (ISBN)978-3-319-67286-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-17 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2018-10-17
Waite, S. (Ed.). (2019). Outdoor learning research: Insight into forms and functions. Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outdoor learning research: Insight into forms and functions
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

From publisher's website:

The term ‘outdoor learning’ covers many forms of practice outside the classroom, including Forest School and outdoor play. Outdoor learning has been rapidly growing as a topic of interest for educators and parents over the last ten years and research published in this field is also increasing. Despite the fact that we are inextricably part of the natural world, there is concern that contemporary children have become disconnected from nature and that their opportunities to access natural environments are declining. Given compelling evidence that time spent in natural places has multiple benefits for human health and wellbeing and pro-environmental behaviour (Bourn et al., 2016), there is an impetus to find ways to increase children’s exposure to and attachment to nature through their education.

The chapters in this book were originally peer reviewed articles published in Education 3–13: International Journal of Primary, Elementary and Early Years Education. They are amongst the most popular in the journal, reflecting the demand for more evidence of outcomes and high-quality information about how best to implement outdoor learning for children in this age group. The authors report qualitative and quantitative studies and consider implications of the findings for children and their development, and for the integration (or not) of natural environment contexts within school practices. Gathering this body of evidence together in a single volume enables important messages about outdoor learning’s various purposes, processes and outcomes to be more readily accessed by practitioners, policy makers and researchers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019. p. 360
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41860 (URN)9781138348998 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-17 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved
Edwards-Jones, A., Waite, S. & Passy, R. (2018). Falling into LINE: school strategies for overcoming challenges associated with learning in natural environments (LINE). Education 3-13, 46(1), 49-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Falling into LINE: school strategies for overcoming challenges associated with learning in natural environments (LINE)
2018 (English)In: Education 3-13, ISSN 0300-4279, E-ISSN 1475-7575, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As the benefits of outdoor learning have become of increasing interest to the education sector, so the importance of understanding and overcoming challenges associated with this pedagogy has gained greater significance. The Natural Connections Demonstration Project recruited primary, secondary, and special schools across south-west England with a view to stimulating and supporting ‘learning in the natural environment’ across the region. This research paper examines qualitative data obtained from case study visits to 12 of these schools. The results from teaching staff interviews and focus groups show that schools face many and varied challenges to embedding outdoor learning, and a raft of strategies are presented for tackling these challenges and integrating learning in the natural environment into much of the current curriculum. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
barriers, curriculum learning, learning in the natural environment, learning outside the classroom, natural connections, Outdoor learning, school grounds
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41858 (URN)10.1080/03004279.2016.1176066 (DOI)000428727100005 ()2-s2.0-84965057158 (Scopus ID)HLKLPSIS (Local ID)HLKLPSIS (Archive number)HLKLPSIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-10-17 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Waite, S. & Goodenough, A. (2018). What is different about Forest School?: Creating a space for an alternative pedagogy in England. Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education, 21(1), 25-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is different about Forest School?: Creating a space for an alternative pedagogy in England
2018 (English)In: Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education, ISSN 2522-879X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Forest School in the UK has arguably provided a space of pedagogical ‘difference’ whilst wider structural pressures have reduced the room for novelty and diversity in delivery of state education. This article explores how perceived ‘differences’ between everyday educational contexts can benefit the wellbeing of participants in Forest Education across different ages. It calls into question the application of play-based learning theory to underpin English Forest School as advocated by Leather in this issue. Drawing on Forest School principles, empirical evidence and the theory of cultural density, we examine how Forest School can present important cultural and material contrasts in English young people’s experience and argue for the importance of this function within this context. We critique aspects of the dilution of Forest School principles, arguing that in England, and perhaps other cultures where outdoor experiences have become relatively rare, it is important that Forest School is valued as a site of divergence from more common learning spaces and situations.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41859 (URN)10.1007/s42322-017-0005-2 (DOI)HLKLPSIS (Local ID)HLKLPSIS (Archive number)HLKLPSIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-10-17 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2561-612x

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