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Jacobsson, Mattias
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Jacobsson, M. & Linderoth, H. (2019). From Tools to Theories: Four Approaches to Construction IT Research. In: : . Paper presented at 35th Annual ARCOM Conference, Leeds, UK, 2-4 September, 2019. Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Tools to Theories: Four Approaches to Construction IT Research
2019 (English)In: , Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Construction IT (CIT) has recently developed into a research field in its own right, with a unifying goal of enhancing the use of digital technologies to improve performance by enabling faster, cheaper, and better construction. However, we argue that CIT research has even greater potential. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to analyse the current state of CIT research and illustrate how its scope can be extended to make relevant and interesting contributions to the wider information systems (IS) community. Based on a phenomenology-inspired analysis of contemporary CIT research, we identified four streams of research. Each stream is characterized by its taken-for-granted assumptions, core audience, and assumed purpose of theories. The identified streams are: Building better buildings with IT; Building buildings with IT theories; Building theories of construction IT; and Building better IT/IS theories. For each stream, we discussed the general view on IT/IS and provided examples of potential publication outlets. This article provides a schematic overview of CIT research, as well as new insights into challenges and opportunities in extending CIT contributions, and making them relevant to a wider IS community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2019
Keywords
digital, theory, methodology, phenomenology, Construction IT
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45948 (URN)
Conference
35th Annual ARCOM Conference, Leeds, UK, 2-4 September, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-13 Created: 2019-09-13 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Gaim, M., Wåhlin, N. & Jacobsson, M. (2019). The role of space for a paradoxical way of thinking and doing: A study of idea work in architectural firms. Creativity and Innovation Management, 8(2), 265-281
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of space for a paradoxical way of thinking and doing: A study of idea work in architectural firms
2019 (English)In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 265-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well established that engaging paradoxes and the role of space are important aspects of idea work. Although the significance has been recognized, studies that focus on the intersection between space and paradox are scarce. Accordingly, this article explores the intersection and focuses on the role of space in idea work characterized by paradoxes. More specifically, the aim of this article is twofold. First, the article aims at identifying the spatial conditions that enable organization members to think and act paradoxically. Second, the article aims at exploring how spatial conditions evoke a paradoxical way of thinking and doing. Based on three Scandinavian architectural firms, and through abductive inference, four spatial conditions are identified and outlined. The conditions are conceptualized as organized chaos, boundary(less)ness, premeditated spontaneity, and (re)framing. From the results, and through the discussion, the notion of "generative space" is introduced to explain the overall importance of spatiality, as well as how the interrelatedness of the conditions facilitates a paradoxical way of thinking and doing in idea work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Architectural Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41378 (URN)10.1111/caim.12288 (DOI)000469267200011 ()2-s2.0-85052920756 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Lundin, R. A. (2019). World views on projects and society. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 12(2), 238-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>World views on projects and society
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 238-241Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45324 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-06-2019-285 (DOI)000479290200001 ()2-s2.0-85067357284 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-11 Created: 2019-07-11 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Linderoth, H., Jacobsson, M. & Elbanna, A. (2018). Barriers for digital transformation: The role of industry. In: : . Paper presented at ACIS2018, 29th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, UTS, Sydney, Australia, 3rd-5th December, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers for digital transformation: The role of industry
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Limited attention has been paid to why certain industries, like the AEC (Architectural, Engineering and Construction), is lagging behind in digital transformation. The question can be raised if there are characteristics on industry level that constrain digital transformation? The aim of the paper is to explore how the interactions among four industry key actors; architects, clients, contractors and consultants shape industry characteristics and the options for digital transformation through adoption and use of digital technology. The aim will be achieved through a combination of individual- and focus group interviews with representatives of the key actor groups focused on how they perceive Building Information Modelling (BIM). It is concluded that the characteristics of the industry; the focus on practical day-to-day action, a heterogeneous client side who have difficulties in putting demands on contractors and sub-contractors due to lack of competencies, and a product that raise barriers for process innovations do effectively constrain digital transformation.

Keywords
Industry analysis, Digitalization, Transformation, Building and Construction, ICT, Adoption
National Category
Communication Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45929 (URN)2-s2.0-85071666713 (Scopus ID)
Conference
ACIS2018, 29th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, UTS, Sydney, Australia, 3rd-5th December, 2018
Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Merschbrock, C. (2018). BIM coordinators: a review. Engineering Construction and Architectural Management, 25(8), 989-1008
Open this publication in new window or tab >>BIM coordinators: a review
2018 (English)In: Engineering Construction and Architectural Management, ISSN 0969-9988, E-ISSN 1365-232X, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 989-1008Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the role, practices and responsibilities of building information modeling (BIM) coordinators (BCs).

Design/methodology/approach – The aim is achieved through a review of existing publications (n 1⁄4 183) in which the term “BIM coordinators” has been described and discussed (n 1⁄4 78), complemented by interviews with four Norwegian BIM experts.

Findings – The findings from the review indicate that the core responsibilities of BCs involve clash detection, managing information flows and communication flows, monitoring and coordinating design changes, supporting new working procedures and technical development and acting as a boundary spanner. The complementary interview study extends these findings with two additional practices and a reflection on the experienced challenges, obstacles and potential future development of the role. In essence, the authors propose that the role of BCs can be defined as being responsible for external/internal alignment and coordination of actor needs, and engaged in product-, process- and system-oriented practices of BIM.

Research limitations/implications – Given that this study is primarily an integrative literature review of BCs, it has the limitations common with such an approach. Therefore, future studies should preferably extend presented findings through either a survey, further in-depth interviews with BCs or reviews of closely related BIM specialist roles such as BIM managers or BIM technicians.

Practical implications – With BCs seemingly being central to information management and knowledge domain integration within the architecture, engineering and construction industry, an understanding of their importance and role should be of interest to anyone seeking to tap into the potential of BIM. This paper outlines specific implications for construction manager, educators and BCs.

Originality/value – The value of this study lies primarily in the fact that it is the first thorough investigation of the role, practices and responsibilities of BCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
Information systems, Project management, Building information modelling, Integrated practice
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41554 (URN)10.1108/ECAM-03-2017-0050 (DOI)000445060900002 ()2-s2.0-85053477804 (Scopus ID)PP JTH 2019 (Local ID)PP JTH 2019 (Archive number)PP JTH 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Wilson, T. L. (2018). Tinkerbell and the Empire State Building: Recalling what seems to be forgotten. PM World Journal, VII(VII), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tinkerbell and the Empire State Building: Recalling what seems to be forgotten
2018 (English)In: PM World Journal, ISSN 2330-4480, Vol. VII, no VII, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

“I do believe in fairies! I do! I do!!” (Peter Pan)

In the 1905 play “Peter Pan; or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up”, Sir James Matthew Barrie described how Peter Pan, through his strong beliefs, brought the fairy Tinkerbell back to life. In this short essay, we aim to initiate discussions on the role of strong beliefs and the so-called “Tinkerbell effect” in upholding taken-for-granted assumptions within the construction industry.

As the basis for the discussion, the essay reports on a recently published journal article in Business Horizons entitled “Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: Have we forgotten something?” (Jacobsson and Wilson, 2018). Presently the article is also sold as a case study and teaching case by Harvard Business Review. (The case study can be accessed at https://tinyurl.com/HBRcasestudy and the teaching case at https://tinyurl.com/HBPEcase)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PM World Inc., 2018
Keywords
Projects, Empire State Building, Construction, Project Management, Mega projects
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41333 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M., Linderoth, H. C. J. & Rowlinson, S. (2017). The role of industry: an analytical framework to understand ICT transformation within the AEC industry. Construction Management and Economics, 35(10), 611-626
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of industry: an analytical framework to understand ICT transformation within the AEC industry
2017 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 611-626Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite wide-ranging research on information and communication technologies (ICT) in the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry, little is known about the role that industry plays in the adoption and use of ICT. Based on observations of how the drivers for ICT use seem to be inconsistent with the industry’s central characteristics, and drawing on information systems (IS) research that demonstrates the role of shared systems of meaning, the purpose here is to develop an analytical framework that explains how industry shapes the adoption and use of ICT. Building on a theoretically driven approach and a case study, a framework is first sketched and then substantiated through empirical illustrations. Three dimensions of industry are highlighted: the socio-cognitive environment, the market and production environment and institutional actors. It is explained how the interplay of these dimensions shapes the way the industry functions, which in turn influence the adoption and use of ICT. The outcomes of the interplay can either be aligned or misaligned with ICT, which explains why certain aligned applications are rapidly adopted, whereas other applications are not. The primary implication is that the framework can aid in analysing the need for structural adaptation when trying to achieve ICT-induced change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
AEC industry, analytical framework, ICT, Industry analysis, transformation, Construction, Project management, Architecture, engineering and construction industries, Information and Communication Technologies, Production environments, Structural adaptation, Network function virtualization
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35483 (URN)10.1080/01446193.2017.1315148 (DOI)000413957500002 ()2-s2.0-85017596331 (Scopus ID)JTHBebyggdIS (Local ID)JTHBebyggdIS (Archive number)JTHBebyggdIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-05-09 Created: 2017-05-09 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M., Lundin, R. A. & Söderholm, A. (2016). Towards a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations: Analyzing the Scandinavian turn and the rethinking effort. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 9(4), 752-766
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations: Analyzing the Scandinavian turn and the rethinking effort
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 752-766Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze important parts of the contemporary development of project research and to outline plausible and desirable directions for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This is accomplished through a review of the “Scandinavian School of Project Management” and “Rethinking Project Management,” which is complemented with a set of questions distributed to 27 active researchers within the project research field from around the world.

Findings

Through the analysis the authors show how the two streams have more similarities than differences, despite the fact that they have been initiated in very different contexty 8ts and ways. The authors could also conclude that the “Scandinavian School” appears stronger on the international scene than in the Nordic countries, and that general perception of what the “school” stands for has changed and been blurred with time. Based on the analysis the authors also proposed the need for a broad, more coherent research effort in terms of a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations. The essence of this would be: an action research profile to improve practice and foresee the future; a combined research focus on institutional change and project practice to ensure both theoretical and empirical progress; and a strong global perspective to further enrich both theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This research has obvious limitations in terms of empirical scope and response selection. The questionnaire results should therefore be interpreted with care.

Originality/value

The value of this research lies in its reflective nature and the proposed trajectory of the project research domain.

Keywords
Project management, Development, Projects, Temporary organizations, Future directions, Scandinavian School of Project Management
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31708 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-10-2015-0100 (DOI)000386076000004 ()2-s2.0-84985028705 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M., Lundin, R. A. & Söderholm, A. (2015). Researching projects and theorizing families of temporary organizations. Project Management Journal, 46(5), 9-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researching projects and theorizing families of temporary organizations
2015 (English)In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Following contemporary development in which most temporary, focused, and organized endeavors can be regarded as a project and studied as a temporary organization, here we ask: How can these phenomena be defined without hindering pluralism in understanding, development, and theorizing? Based on the notions of family resemblance-the idea that it is not a specific trait, but a variety of traits that are shared by some, but not all, members of a family-we propose a new dynamic framework we believe is useful in advancing the studies of projects and temporary organizations toward more opportunities for rigorous theorizing.

Keywords
projects, temporary organizations, conceptual, family resemblance, theory
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28496 (URN)10.1002/pmj.21520 (DOI)000364590600006 ()2-s2.0-84942295761 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Lundin, R. A. (2015). The Scandinavian turn of project research: Reflections on history and future directions. In: : . Paper presented at 23rd Nordic Academy of Management Conference - NFF 2015 – Business In Society,Copenhagen Business School, 12-14 August 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Scandinavian turn of project research: Reflections on history and future directions
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In retrospect it appears that there was a turn in project research during the late 1980's and beginning of the 1990's. The subsequent movement - centered on applying organization theory approaches to projects - is now coming of age. In this paper we focus on the 'coming of age' notion by describing trajectories for the 'Scandinavian School of Project Management' - where it comes from, how it has developed over time, and ultimately reflecting on the question if the movement still exists. In doing so, we juxtapose the emergent ideas with a more structured research programme that came out of the UK around 2006. The main questions addressed concern a) on what these two streams of research have been founded, b) how they have evolved, and c) their influence. Our purpose is to describe and analyze important parts of the contemporary development of project research and to outline potential and plausible directions for the future. The results, which are partly based on a survey distributed to 27 active and well-renowned project researchers around the world, shows that there are signs that the once novel notion of the Scandinavian school has now developed to become normal science in the Kuhn (1970) sense of the expression. Taking on a Kuhnian perspective of the development we sketch two different but parallel types of directions for the future. The first type is to be described as 'research as usual', consisting of refinements in line with previous studies along the lines of current practices. The second type is based on how scientific revolutions, potentially also triggered by developments in other scientific areas, might develop to foster new and future directions-a development here tentatively called, a 'Neo-Scandinavian School of Project Research'.

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28543 (URN)
Conference
23rd Nordic Academy of Management Conference - NFF 2015 – Business In Society,Copenhagen Business School, 12-14 August 2015
Available from: 2015-12-10 Created: 2015-12-10 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
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