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Bergman, Annika
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Engel, C., Versmold, B., Wappenschmidt, B., Simard, J., Easton, D. F., Peock, S., . . . Schmutzler, R. K. (2010). Association of the variants CASP8 D302H and CASP10 V410I with breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 19(11), 2859-2868
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of the variants CASP8 D302H and CASP10 V410I with breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers
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2010 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 2859-2868Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The genes caspase-8 (CASP8) and caspase-10 (CASP10) functionally cooperate and play a key role in the initiation of apoptosis. Suppression of apoptosis is one of the major mechanisms underlying the origin and progression of cancer. Previous case-control studies have indicated that the polymorphisms CASP8 D302H and CASP10 V410I are associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population.

Methods: To evaluate whether the CASP8 D302H (CASP10 V410I) polymorphisms modify breast or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we analyzed 7,353 (7,227) subjects of white European origin provided by 19 (18) study groups that participate in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). A weighted cohort approach was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).

Results: The minor allele of CASP8 D302H was significantly associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (per-allele HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.97; Ptrend = 0.011) and ovarian cancer (per-allele HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53-0.89; Ptrend = 0.004) for BRCA1 but not for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The CASP10 V410I polymorphism was not associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Conclusions: CASP8 D302H decreases breast and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers but not for BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Impact: The combined application of these and other recently identified genetic riskmodifiers could in the future allow better individual risk calculation and could aid in the individualized counseling and decision making with respect to preventive options in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2010
Keywords
BRCA1 protein, BRCA2 protein, caspase 10, caspase 8, adult, allele, article, breast cancer, cancer risk, DNA polymorphism, female, genetic variability, human, major clinical study, ovary cancer, priority journal, Breast Neoplasms, Genes, BRCA1, Genes, BRCA2, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, Humans, Mutation, Ovarian Neoplasms, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39676 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-0517 (DOI)000283991600020 ()20978178 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-78549237225 (Scopus ID)
Note

The Swedish BRCA1 and BRCA2 study (SWE-BRCA) SWE-BRCA collaborators: Per Karlsson, Margareta Nordling, Annika Bergman, and Zakaria Einbeigi, Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Marie Stenmark-Askmalm and Sigrun Liedgren, Linkoping University Hospital; Ake Borg, Niklas Loman, Hakan Olsson, Ulf Kristoffersson, Helena Jernstrom, Katja Harbst, and Karin Henriksson, Lund University Hospital; Annika Lindblom, Brita Arver, Anna von Wachenfeldt, Annelie Liljegren, Gisela Barbany-Bustinza, and Johanna Rantala, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital; Beatrice Malmer, Henrik Gronberg, Eva-Lena Stattin, and Monica Emanuelsson, Umea University Hospital; Hans Ehrencrona, Richard Rosenquist Brandell, and Niklas Dahl, Uppsala University Hospital. We thank the Swedish Cancer Society.

Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Antoniou, A. C., Beesley, J., McGuffog, L., Sinilnikova, O. M., Healey, S., Neuhausen, S. L., . . . Easton, D. F. (2010). Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Implications for risk prediction. Cancer Research, 70(23), 9742-9754
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Implications for risk prediction
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2010 (English)In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 70, no 23, p. 9742-9754Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10-11 - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2010
Keywords
BRCA1 protein, BRCA2 protein, adult, aged, article, attributable risk, breast cancer, cancer risk, cancer susceptibility, clinical evaluation, controlled study, female, follow up, gene frequency, gene mutation, genotype, heterozygote, human, major clinical study, priority journal, probability, risk assessment, single nucleotide polymorphism, tumor suppressor gene, Aged, 80 and over, Alleles, Breast Neoplasms, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Middle Aged, Mutation, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Receptors, Progesterone, Risk Factors, Sodium-Bicarbonate Symporters, Survival Analysis, Vesicular Transport Proteins
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39678 (URN)10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-1907 (DOI)000285045900024 ()21118973 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-78649980806 (Scopus ID)
Note

SWE-BRCA

SWE-BRCA collaborators: Per Karlsson, Margareta Nordling, Annika Bergman, and Zakaria Einbeigi, Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Sigrun Liedgren, Linkoping University Hospital; Niklas Loman, Ha kan Olsson, Ulf Kristoffersson, Helena Jernstr€om, Katja Harbst, and Karin Henriksson, Lund University Hospital; Brita Arver, Anna von Wachenfeldt, Annelie Liljegren, and Gisela Barbany-Bustinza, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital; Henrik Gronberg, Eva-Lena Stattin, and Monica Emanuelsson, Umea University Hos- € pital; Hans Ehrencrona, Richard Rosenquist Brandell, and Niklas Dahl, Uppsala University Hospital

Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Antoniou, A. C., Sinilnikova, O. M., McGuffog, L., Healey, S., Nevanlinna, H., Heikkinen, T., . . . Chenevix-Trench, G. (2009). Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Human Molecular Genetics, 18(22), 4442-4456
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers
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2009 (English)In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 18, no 22, p. 4442-4456Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.25, P-trend = 2.8 × 10-4]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04-1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case-control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2009
Keywords
BRCA1 protein, BRCA2 protein, oncoprotein, protein LSP1, unclassified drug, adult, aged, allele, article, breast cancer, cancer risk, controlled study, gene mutation, genetic association, heterozygote, human, priority journal, single nucleotide polymorphism, Aged, 80 and over, Breast Neoplasms, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genetic Variation, Genetics, Population, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Microfilament Proteins, Middle Aged, Mutation, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Young Adult
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39677 (URN)10.1093/hmg/ddp372 (DOI)000271107300019 ()2-s2.0-71049194443 (Scopus ID)
Note

The Swedish BRCA1 and BRCA2 Study (SWE-BRCA)

SWE-BRCA collaborators: P.K., Margareta Nordling, Annika Bergman and Zakaria Einbeigi, Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Marie Stenmark-Askmalm and Sigrun Liedgren, Linkoping University Hospital; Ake Borg, Niklas Loman, Hakan Olsson, Ulf Kristoffersson, Helena Jernstrom, K.H. and Karin Henrisson, Lund University Hospital; Annika Lindblom, Brita Arver, Anna von Wachenfeldt, Annelie Liljegren, G.B.-B. and J.R., Stockholm, Karolinska. University Hospital; Beatrice Malmer, Eva-Lena Stattin and Monica Emanuelsson, Umea University Hospital; H.E., Richard Rosenquist Brandell and Niklas Dahl, Uppsala University Hospital.

Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Osorio, A., Milne, R. L., Pita, G., Peterlongo, P., Heikkinen, T., Simard, J., . . . Benítez, J. (2009). Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the consortium of investigators of modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA). British Journal of Cancer, 101(12), 2048-2054
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the consortium of investigators of modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)
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2009 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 101, no 12, p. 2048-2054Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods: We have genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. Results: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P0.5) mutation carriers. Conclusion: This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2009
Keywords
BRCA1, BRCA2, Breast cancer, ERCC4, BRCA1 protein, BRCA2 protein, article, cancer risk, cancer susceptibility, ERCC4 gene, female, gene, gene mutation, gene sequence, genetic association, genetic susceptibility, genotype, heterozygote, human, major clinical study, priority journal, retrospective study, single nucleotide polymorphism, Cohort Studies, DNA-Binding Proteins, Genes, BRCA1, Genes, BRCA2, Humans, Mutation, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Retrospective Studies
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39672 (URN)10.1038/sj.bjc.6605416 (DOI)000272557800015 ()19920816 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-71649085141 (Scopus ID)
Note

The Swedish BRCA1 and BRCA2 study collaborators (SWEBRCA): Per Karlsson, Margareta Nordling, Annika Bergman and Zakaria Einbeigi, Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Marie Stenmark-Askmalm and Sigrun Liedgren, Linkoping University Hospital; Ake Borg, Niklas Loman, Hakan Olsson, Ulf Kristoffersson, Helena Jernstrom, Katja Harbst and Karin Henriksson, Lund University Hospital; Annika Lindblom, Brita Arver, Anna von Wachenfeldt, Annelie Liljegren, Gisela Barbany-Bustinza and Johanna Rantala, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital; Beatrice Malmer, Eva-Lena Stattin and Monica Emanuelsson, Umea University Hospital; Hans Ehrencrona, Richard Rosenquist Brandell and Niklas Dahl, Uppsala University Hospital.

Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Bergman, A., Sahlin, P., Emanuelsson, M., Carén, H., Tarnow, P., Martinsson, T., . . . Stenman, G. (2009). Germline mutation screening of the Saethre-Chotzen-associated genes TWIST1 and FGFR3 in families with BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer. Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, 43(5), 251-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Germline mutation screening of the Saethre-Chotzen-associated genes TWIST1 and FGFR3 in families with BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer
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2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 0284-4311, E-ISSN 1651-2073, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 251-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is one of the most common craniosynostosis syndromes. It is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder with variable expression that is caused by germline mutations in the TWIST1 gene or more rarely in the FGFR2 or FGFR3 genes. We have previously reported that patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here we have analysed a cohort of 26 women with BRCA1/2-negative hereditary breast cancer to study whether a proportion of these families might have mutations in Saethre-Chotzen-associated genes. DNA sequence analysis of TWIST1 showed no pathogenic mutations in the coding sequence in any of the 26 patients. MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification)-analysis also showed no alterations in copy numbers in any of the craniofacial disorder genes MSX2, ALX4, RUNX2, EFNB1, TWIST1, FGFR1, FGFR2,FGFR3, or FGFR4. Taken together, our findings indicate that mutations in Saethre-Chotzen-associated genes are uncommon or absent in BRCA1/2-negative patients with hereditary breast cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2009
Keywords
BRCA1, BRCA2, FGFR2, FGFR3, Hereditary breast cancer, Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, TWIST1, ALX4 protein, human, DNA binding protein, EFNB1 protein, human, ephrin B1, FGFR1 protein, human, FGFR2 protein, human, FGFR3 protein, human, FGFR4 protein, human, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3, fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, homeodomain protein, nuclear protein, RUNX2 protein, human, transcription factor, transcription factor MSX2, transcription factor RUNX2, transcription factor Twist, TWIST1 protein, human, acrocephalosyndactyly, adult, article, breast tumor, DNA sequence, female, genetic screening, genetics, human, middle aged, mutation, polymerase chain reaction, tumor suppressor gene, Acrocephalosyndactylia, Breast Neoplasms, Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit, DNA-Binding Proteins, Ephrin-B1, Genes, BRCA1, Genes, BRCA2, Genetic Testing, Germ-Line Mutation, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Nuclear Proteins, Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 1, Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 2, Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 3, Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 4, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Transcription Factors, Twist Transcription Factor
National Category
Surgery Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39619 (URN)10.3109/02844310903247228 (DOI)000272145200003 ()19863427 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77949564227 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Johnatty, S. E., Couch, F. J., Fredericksen, Z., Tarrell, R., Spurdle, A. B., Beesley, J., . . . Chenevix-Trench, G. (2009). No evidence that GATA3 rs570613 SNP modifies breast cancer risk. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 117(2), 371-379
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No evidence that GATA3 rs570613 SNP modifies breast cancer risk
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2009 (English)In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 117, no 2, p. 371-379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA3) is a transcription factor that is crucial to mammary gland morphogenesis and differentiation of progenitor cells, and has been suggested to have a tumor suppressor function. The rs570613 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in intron 4 of GATA3 was previously found to be associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility project and in pooled analysis of two case-control studies from Norway and Poland (P trend = 0.004), with some evidence for a stronger association with estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumours [Garcia-Closas M et al. (2007) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 16:2269-2275]. We genotyped GATA3 rs570613 in 6,388 cases and 4,995 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and 5,617 BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). We found no association between this SNP and breast cancer risk in BCAC cases overall (ORper-allele = 1.00, 95% CI 0.94-1.05), in ER negative BCAC cases (ORper-allele = 1.02, 95% CI 0.91-1.13), in BRCA1 mutation carriers RRper-allele = 0.99, 95% CI 0.90-1.09) or BRCA2 mutation carriers (RRper-allele = 0.93, 95% CI 0.80-1.07). We conclude that there is no evidence that either GATA3 rs570613, or any variant in strong linkage disequilibrium with it, is associated with breast cancer risk in women. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2009
Keywords
BRCA1 and BRCA2, Breast cancer, GATA3, Polymorphism, Risk, estrogen receptor, transcription factor GATA 3, adult, allele, article, BRCA2 oncogene, cancer risk, cell differentiation, controlled study, female, GATA3 gene, gene linkage disequilibrium, genetic association, genetic marker, genotype, human, intron, major clinical study, mammary gland, morphogenesis, Norway, oncogene, Poland, priority journal, risk reduction, single nucleotide polymorphism, stem cell, Breast Neoplasms, GATA3 Transcription Factor, Genes, BRCA1, Genes, BRCA2, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Mutation, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39674 (URN)10.1007/s10549-008-0257-1 (DOI)000269005500018 ()19082709 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-68949092457 (Scopus ID)
Note

The Swedish BRCA1 and BRCA2 study (SWE-BRCA) collaborators are Per Karlsson, Margareta Nordling, Annika Bergman, and Zakaria Einbeigi, Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Marie Stenmark-Askmalm and Sigrun Liedgren, Linkoping University Hospital; Ake Borg, Niklas Loman, Hakan Olsson, Ulf Kristoffersson, Helena Jernstrom, and Katja Backenhorn, Lund University Hospital; Annika Lindblom, Brita Arver, Anna von Wachenfeldt, Annelie Liljegren, Gisela Barbany-Bustinza, and Johanna Rantala, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital; Henrik Gronberg, Eva-Lena Stattin, and Monica Emanuelsson, Umea University Hospital; Hans Bostrom, Richard Rosenquist Brandell, and Niklas Dahl, Uppsala University Hospital.

Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Thorell, K., Bergman, A., Carén, H., Nilsson, S., Kogner, P., Martinsson, T. & Abel, F. (2009). Verification of genes differentially expressed in neuroblastoma tumours: A study of potential tumour suppressor genes. BMC Medical Genomics, 2, Article ID 53.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Verification of genes differentially expressed in neuroblastoma tumours: A study of potential tumour suppressor genes
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2009 (English)In: BMC Medical Genomics, ISSN 1755-8794, E-ISSN 1755-8794, Vol. 2, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: One of the most striking features of the childhood malignancy neuroblastoma (NB) is its clinical heterogeneity. Although there is a great need for better clinical and biological markers to distinguish between tumours with different severity and to improve treatment, no clear-cut prognostic factors have been found. Also, no major NB tumour suppressor genes have been identified.

Methods: In this study we performed expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) on primary NB tumours divided into two groups, of favourable and unfavourable outcome respectively. Candidate genes were selected on basis of lower expression in unfavourable tumour types compared to favourables in our microarray expression analysis. Selected genes were studied in two steps: (1) using TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA) targeting 89 genes on a set of 12 NB tumour samples, and (2) 12 genes were selected from the TLDA analysis for verification using individual TaqMan assays in a new set of 13 NB tumour samples.

Results: By TLDA analysis, 81 out of 87 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed between groups, of which 14 have previously been reported as having an altered gene expression in NB. In the second verification round, seven out of 12 transcripts showed significantly lower expression in unfavourable NB tumours, ATBF1, CACNA2D3, CNTNAP2, FUSIP1, GNB1, SLC35E2, and TFAP2B. The gene that showed the highest fold change in the TLDA analysis, POU4F2, was investigated for epigenetic changes (CpG methylation) and mutations in order to explore the cause of the differential expression. Moreover, the fragile site gene CNTNAP2 that showed the largest fold change in verification group 2 was investigated for structural aberrations by copy number analysis. However, the analyses of POU4F2 and CNTNAP2 showed no genetic alterations that could explain a lower expression in unfavourable NB tumours.

Conclusion: Through two steps of verification, seven transcripts were found to significantly discriminate between favourable and unfavourable NB tumours. Four of the transcripts, CACNA2D3, GNB1, SLC35E2, and TFAP2B, have been observed in previous microarray studies, and are in this study independently verified. Our results suggest these transcripts to be markers of malignancy, which could have a potential usefulness in the clinic. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2009
Keywords
antineoplastic agent, transcription factor, transcription factor ATBF1, transcription factor CACNA2D3, transcription factor FUSIP1, transcription factor GNB1, transcription factor POU4F2, transcription factor SLC35E2, transcription factor TFAP2B, unclassified drug, article, cancer surgery, child, clinical article, controlled study, disease severity, epigenetics, gene expression, gene identification, gene mutation, gene number, genetic difference, human, infant, microarray analysis, multiple cycle treatment, neuroblastoma, nucleotide sequence, outcome assessment, preschool child, priority journal, prognosis, protein methylation, quantitative analysis, real time polymerase chain reaction, risk factor, Taqman low density arrays, tumor classification, tumor suppressor gene
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39620 (URN)10.1186/1755-8794-2-53 (DOI)000272814700001 ()19686582 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-70349251320 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Kanter-Smoler, G., Fritzell, K., Rohlin, A., Engwall, Y., Hallberg, B., Bergman, A., . . . Nordling, M. (2008). Clinical characterization and the mutation spectrum in Swedish adenomatous polyposis families. BMC Medicine, 6, Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical characterization and the mutation spectrum in Swedish adenomatous polyposis families
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2008 (English)In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 6, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The dominantly inherited condition familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutations in the APC gene. Finding the causative mutations has great implications for the families. Correlating the genotypes to the phenotypes could help to improve the diagnosis and follow-up of patients.

Methods: Mutation screening of APCand the clinical characterization of 96 unrelated FAP patients from the Swedish Polyposis Registry was performed. In addition to generally used mutation screening methods, analyses of splicing-affecting mutations and investigations of the presence of low-frequency mutation alleles, indicating mosaics, have been performed, as well as quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect lowered expression of APC.

Results: Sixty-one different APC mutations in 81 of the 96 families were identified and 27 of those are novel. We have previously shown that 6 of the 96 patients carried biallelic MUTYH mutations. The 9 mutation-negative cases all display an attenuated or atypical phenotype. Probands with a genotype (codon 1250-1464) predicting a severe phenotype had a median age at diagnosis of 21.8 (range, 11-49) years compared with 34.4 (range, 14-57) years among those with mutations outside this region (P < 0.017). Dense polyposis (> 1000) occurred in 75% of the probands with a severe phenotype compared with 30% in those with mutations outside this region. The morbidity in colorectal cancer among probands was 25% at a mean age of 37.5 years and 29% at a mean age of 46.6 years.

Conclusion: Using a variety of mutation-detection techniques, we have achieved a 100% detection frequency in classical FAP. Probands with APC mutations outside codon 1250-1464, although exhibiting a less-severe phenotype, are at high risk of having a colorectal cancer at diagnosis indicating that age at diagnosis is as important as the severity of the disease for colorectal cancer morbidity. © 2008 Kanter-Smoler et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2008
Keywords
APC protein, DNA glycosylase MutY, DNA glycosyltransferase, adolescent, adult, age, aged, article, cancer risk, codon, colon polyposis, colorectal cancer, controlled study, disease severity, family, female, gene deletion, gene expression, gene mutation, genetic risk, genetic screening, genotype, high risk population, human, human tissue, ileorectal anastomosis, major clinical study, male, morbidity, mosaicism, mutational analysis, phenotype, prediction, quantitative analysis, real time polymerase chain reaction, school child, statistical significance, Sweden, total colon resection, colorectal tumor, gene frequency, genetics, nucleotide sequence, pathology, pathophysiology, tumor suppressor gene, Adenomatous Polyposis Coli, Colorectal Neoplasms, DNA Glycosylases, DNA Mutational Analysis, Genes, APC, Humans, Sequence Deletion
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39622 (URN)10.1186/1741-7015-6-10 (DOI)000256299900001 ()18433509 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-44049105290 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Bergman, A., Abel, F., Behboudi, A., Yhr, M., Mattsson, J., Svensson, J. H., . . . Nordling, M. (2008). No germline mutations in supposed tumour suppressor genes SAFB1 and SAFB2 in familial breast cancer with linkage to 19p.. BMC Medical Genetics, 9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No germline mutations in supposed tumour suppressor genes SAFB1 and SAFB2 in familial breast cancer with linkage to 19p.
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2008 (English)In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The scaffold attachment factor B1 and B2 genes, SAFB1/SAFB2 (both located on chromosome 19p13.3) have recently been suggested as tumour suppressor genes involved in breast cancer development. The assumption was based on functional properties of the two genes and loss of heterozygosity of intragenic markers in breast tumours further strengthened the postulated hypothesis. In addition, linkage studies in Swedish breast cancer families also indicate the presence of a susceptibility gene for breast cancer at the 19p locus. Somatic mutations in SAFB1/SAFB2 have been detected in breast tumours, but to our knowledge no studies on germline mutations have been reported. In this study we investigated the possible involvement of SAFB1/SAFB2 on familiar breast cancer by inherited mutations in either of the two genes.

RESULTS: Mutation analysis in families showing linkage to the SAFB1/2 locus was performed by DNA sequencing. The complete coding sequence of the two genes SAFB1 and SAFB2 was analyzed in germline DNA from 31 affected women. No missense or frameshift mutations were detected. One polymorphism was found in SAFB1 and eight polymorphisms were detected in SAFB2. MLPA-anlysis showed that both alleles of the two genes were preserved which excludes gene inactivation by large deletions.

CONCLUSION: SAFB1 and SAFB2 are not likely to be causative of the hereditary breast cancer syndrome in west Swedish breast cancer families.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2008
Keywords
estrogen receptor, matrix attachment region binding protein, nuclear matrix protein, SAFB protein, human, SAFB2 protein, human, article, breast tumor, chromosome 19, DNA sequence, female, genetic linkage, genetics, human, mutation, nucleic acid amplification, polymerase chain reaction, Sweden, tumor suppressor gene, Breast Neoplasms, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19, Genes, BRCA1, Genes, BRCA2, Germ-Line Mutation, Humans, Linkage (Genetics), Matrix Attachment Region Binding Proteins, Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins, Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques, Receptors, Estrogen, Sequence Analysis, DNA
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39621 (URN)10.1186/1471-2350-9-108 (DOI)000263124200001 ()19077293 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-59449100380 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Chenevix-Trench, G., Milne, R. L., Antoniou, A. C., Couch, F. J., Easton, D. F. & Goldgar, D. E. (2007). An international initiative to identify genetic modifiers of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (CIMBA). Breast Cancer Research, 9(2), Article ID 104.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An international initiative to identify genetic modifiers of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (CIMBA)
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2007 (English)In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 104Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations exhibit variable penetrance that is likely to be accounted for, in part, by other genetic factors among carriers. However, studies aimed at identifying these factors have been limited in size and statistical power, and have yet to identify any convincingly validated modifiers of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 phenotype. To generate sufficient statistical power to identify modifier genes, the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (CIMBA) has been established. CIMBA contains about 30 affiliated groups who together have collected DNA and clinical data from approximately 10,000 BRCA1 and 5,000 BRCA2 utation carriers. Initial efforts by CIMBA to identify modifiers of breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have focused on validation of common genetic variants previously associated with risk in smaller studies of carriers or unselected breast cancers. Future studies will involve replication of findings from pathway-based and genome-wide association studies in both unselected and familial breast cancer. The identification of genetic modifiers of breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers will lead to an improved understanding of breast cancer and may prove useful for the determination of individualized risk of cancer amongst carriers. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2007
Keywords
tumor protein, allele, article, breast tumor, gene frequency, genetic predisposition, genetics, heterozygote, human, international cooperation, mutation, risk, tumor suppressor gene, Alleles, Breast Neoplasms, Genes, BRCA1, Genes, BRCA2, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Neoplasm Proteins
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39679 (URN)10.1186/bcr1670 (DOI)000247760500003 ()17466083 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34250164598 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved

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