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Abelsson, A. (2019). Anxiety caused by simulated prehospital emergency care. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 29, 24-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety caused by simulated prehospital emergency care
2019 (English)In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 29, p. 24-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the simulation, participants experience different degrees of stress and anxiety. It could be described as “Anxiety is like perpetually hearing the enemy music but never seeing the threat”. This study aimed to describe the Emergency Medical Services personnel's feelings of anxiety during simulation. The study had a qualitative design with interviews of 28 participants. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The result shows how the simulation could be perceived as a stage performance in the form of a theatre. The perceived acting was unpleasant and embarrassing due to unfamiliarity to perform. To be scrutinized meant having spectators reviewing ones' performance. It was considered more natural to care for actors than manikins. The interaction and connection with a human, even unconscious, were more natural. To care for a human did not require the imagination to empathize in the simulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
simulation, manikin, anxiety, prehospital emergency care, Emergency Medical Services
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43323 (URN)10.1016/j.ecns.2019.02.004 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-13 Created: 2019-03-13 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A. & Lundberg, L. (2019). CPR performed in battlefield emergency care. Australasian Journal of Paramedicine, 16, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CPR performed in battlefield emergency care
2019 (English)In: Australasian Journal of Paramedicine, ISSN 2202-7270, Vol. 16, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction

During military missions medical care is provided to military personnel as well as civilians. Although cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may not be a common task in a military field hospital, all personnel need to be trained to deal with cardiac arrest.

Methods

This study was a comparative simulation study. Participants (n=36) from the Swedish armed forces performed CPR for 2 minutes at one of three different locations: at ground level, a military bed, or a transportable military stretcher. Compression depth and rate after 2 minutes of CPR and at the time of the participants’ own request to be relieved were measured. Descriptive and inferential analysis was conducted.

Results

There is a direct correlation between compression depth and working level, concluding that the higher working level, the lower the compression depth. There is in total an overall low percentage of participants within limits for correctly conducted CPR regarding both compression depth and rate. Time to fatigue is related to working level, where increased level results in early fatigue.

Conclusion

The quality of CPR is affected by the level at which it is performed. The quality of CPR was satisfactory when working at ground level, but suboptimal when working at hospital bed level or military stretcher level. When working at raised levels, participants appeared to misjudge their own compression depth and rate. This may indicate that changes are needed when CPR is practised in the military hospital setting. Future studies regarding the use footstools are required due to the height of military beds and transportable stretchers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Official Journal of Paramedics Australasia, 2019
Keywords
military medical personnel; CPR; simulation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43101 (URN)10.33151/ajp.16.610 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A. & Lundberg, L. (2019). Simulation as a means to develop firefighters as emergency care professionals. International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 1-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation as a means to develop firefighters as emergency care professionals
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the simulated emergency care performed by firefighters and their perception of simulation as an educational method.

METHODS: This study had a mixed method with both a quantitative and a qualitative approach. Data were collected by simulation assessment, a questionnaire, and written comments. Descriptive analysis was conducted on the quantitative data whereas a qualitative content analysis was conducted on the qualitative data. Finally, a contingent analysis was used where a synthesis configured both the quantitative and the qualitative results into a narrative result.

RESULTS: The cognitive workload that firefighters face during simulated emergency care is crucial for learning. In this study, the severity and complexity of the scenarios provided were higher than expected by the firefighters. Clearly stated conditions for the simulation and constructive feedback were considered positive for learning. Patient actors induced realism in the scenario, increasing the experience of stress, in comparison to a manikin.

CONCLUSION: To simulate in a realistic on-scene environment increases firefighters' cognitive ability to critically analyze problems and manage emergency care. Simulation of emergency care developed the firefighters as professionals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
cognitive load, contingent analysis synthesis, emergency care, firefighter, simulation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42856 (URN)10.1080/10803548.2018.1541122 (DOI)30362390 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060030635 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-04
Abelsson, A., Lindwall, L., Suserud, B.-O. & Rystedt, I. (2018). Ambulance nurses’ competence and perception of competence in prehospital trauma care. Emergency Medicine International, 2018, Article ID 5910342.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambulance nurses’ competence and perception of competence in prehospital trauma care
2018 (English)In: Emergency Medicine International, ISSN 2090-2840, E-ISSN 2090-2859, Vol. 2018, article id 5910342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction. We focus on trauma care conducted in the context of a simulated traumatic event. This is in this study defined as a four-meter fall onto a hard surface, resulting in severe injuries to extremities in the form of bilateral open femur fractures, an open tibia fracture, and a closed pelvic fracture, all fractures bleeding extensively. 

Methods. The simulated trauma care competence of 63 ambulance nurses in prehospital emergency care was quantitatively evaluated along with their perception of their sufficiency. Data was collected by means of simulated trauma care and a questionnaire. 

Results. Life-saving interventions were not consistently performed. Time to perform interventions could be considered long due to the life-threatening situation. In comparison, the ambulance nurses’ perception of the sufficiency of their theoretical and practical knowledge and skills for trauma care scored high. In contrast, the perception of having sufficient ethical training for trauma care scored low. 

Discussion. This study suggests there is no guarantee that the ambulance nurses’ perception of theoretical and practical knowledge and skill level corresponds with their performed knowledge and skill. The ambulance nurses rated themselves having sufficient theoretical and practical knowledge and skills while the score of trauma care can be considered quite low.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2018
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39212 (URN)10.1155/2018/5910342 (DOI)000431616600001 ()29850251 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-07-11Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A. & Lundberg, L. (2018). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality during CPR practice versus during a simulated life-saving event. International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 24(4), 652-655
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality during CPR practice versus during a simulated life-saving event
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 652-655Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction. As a part of the emergency medical services, the Swedish fire brigade can increase the survival rate in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

Aim. To compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by firefighters at a routine CPR practice versus when involved in a simulated life-saving event.

Methods. In this study, 80 firefighters divided into two groups performed CPR according to guidelines: one group indoors during a routine training session; the other group outdoors during a smoke diving exercise wearing personal protective clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data.

Results. The results showed a tendency for the outdoor group to perform CPR with better ventilation and compression quality, as compared to the indoor group. The ventilation of the manikin was not hampered by the firefighters wearing personal protective clothes and self-contained breathing apparatus, as the Swedish firefighters remove their facial mask and ventilate the patient with their mouth using a pocket mask.

Conclusions. Overall, the results in both groups showed a high quality of CPR which can be related to the fire brigade training and education traditions. CPR training is regularly performed, which in turn helps to maintain CPR skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
cardiopulmonary resuscitation, firefighter, practice, simulation, smoke diving
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41499 (URN)10.1080/10803548.2018.1502962 (DOI)000450275500017 ()30059279 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055831128 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2018-11-30Bibliographically approved
Lerjestam, K., Willman, A., Andersson, I. & Abelsson, A. (2018). Enhancing the quality of CPR performed by laypeople. Australasian Journal of Paramedicine, 15(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing the quality of CPR performed by laypeople
2018 (English)In: Australasian Journal of Paramedicine, ISSN 2202-7270, Vol. 15, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction

The prognosis of survival for a person suffering from cardiac arrest increases when a layperson performs cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on-site. In Sweden, providing CPR training to people working in public places is considered a social benefit.

Objective

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a 3-hour CPR intervention for electricians.

Methods

Data were collected through an intervention by means of simulation and consisted of a pre- and post-assessment of the participants’ CPR performance.

Results

The results show a statistically significant improvement in ventilation (41%) and quality of compression (36%).

Conclusion

With short rehearsal training, the layperson can significantly improve the quality of CPR given. In a situation of cardiac arrest, this can be crucial for the patient’s survival and continued quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Official Journal of Paramedics Australasia, 2018
Keywords
CPR, intervention, layperson, simulation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42368 (URN)10.33151/ajp.15.4.594 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A. & Lindwall, L. (2018). Ethical dilemmas in prehospital emergency care – from the perspective of specialist ambulance nurse students. International Journal of Ethics Education, 3(2), 181-192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethical dilemmas in prehospital emergency care – from the perspective of specialist ambulance nurse students
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Ethics Education, ISSN 2363-9997, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 181-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to describe specialist ambulance nurse students’ experiences of ethical conflicts and dilemmas in prehospital emergency care. In the autumn of 2015, after participating in a mandatory lecture on ethics, 24 specialist ambulance nurse (SAN) students reported experiences and interpretations concerning conflicts and ethical dilemmas from prehospital emergency care. The text consisted of 24 written critical incidents which were interpreted using hermeneutic text interpretation. The text revealed three themes: Not safeguarding a patient’s body and identity; Not agreeing on the care actions; and Not treating the patient with dignity. The SANs experiences ethical dilemmas and conflict of values when they witness how others violate a patient’s dignity. Discussion and reflection is based on ethical conflicts and dilemmas experienced when students see how caregivers do not safeguard the patient’s body or identity. When caregivers have a conflicting will, it results in patients not being treated in an ethical manner. Also, seeing how caregivers put themselves in a power position over patients is described as an ethical dilemma that students experience when they choose not to intervene.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Human dignity; Ethical conflict; Ethical dilemma; Specialist ambulance nurse; Critical incident technique; Hermeneutic text interpretation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39460 (URN)10.1007/s40889-018-0055-5 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A. (2018). First response emergency care - experiences described by firefighters. International Journal of Emergency Services
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First response emergency care - experiences described by firefighters
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Emergency Services, ISSN 2047-0894, E-ISSN 2047-0908Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper was to describe firefighters’ experiences of First Response Emergency Care.

Design/methodology/approach – An explorative descriptive design with a qualitative approach. Data was collected through group interviews of 35 firefighters and subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Findings – The results showed that the firefighters’ professional role and their uniform serve as protection against mentally strenuous situations. It is important to protect the dignity of the injured or dead, as well as to protect and safeguard colleagues from the experience of the tragedy of an accident. Having a solid and sterling medical education gives a sense of security when providing emergency care, as well as when caring for the relatives. Debriefing brings thoughts and feelings to the surface for processing and closure. The sense of sadness lingers for those they were unable to save, or the ones that had been dead on arrival or were forgotten.

Originality/value – A firefighter’s work situation is exposed and stressful. The firefighter’s uniform as a mental barrier, colleagues, time to mentally prepare and being allowed to show feelings are factors all needed to cope. It is therefore important to encourage, promote and strengthen the protective role of camaraderie for the firefighter, which can likely be emphasized for other uniform-wearing professions such as police, military and ambulance personell. Being acknowledged for their contribution to other peoples’ lives and wellbeing can confirm the firefighters’ importance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
First Response Emergency Care, Firefighters
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42154 (URN)10.1108/IJES-05-2018-0026 (DOI)2-s2.0-85058448141 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2019-01-18
Abelsson, A., Rystedt, I., Suserud, B.-O. & Lindwall, L. (2018). Learning high-energy trauma care through simulation. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 17, 1-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning high-energy trauma care through simulation
2018 (English)In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 17, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simulation provides the opportunity to learn how to care for patients in complex situations, such as when patients are exposed to high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle accidents. The aim of the study was to describe nurses' perceptions of high-energy trauma care through simulation in prehospital emergency care. The study had a qualitative design. Interviews were conducted with 20 nurses after performing a simulated training series. Data were analyzed using a phenomenographic method. The result indicates that simulation establishes, corrects, and confirms knowledge and skills related to trauma care in prehosp ital emergency settings. Trauma knowledge is readily available in memory and can be quickly retrieved in a future trauma situation. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
ambulance, experience, learning, method, phenomenography, prehospital emergency care, simulation, trauma
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39777 (URN)10.1016/j.ecns.2017.11.009 (DOI)000428714000001 ()2-s2.0-85039151313 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A., Appelgren, J. & Axelsson, C. (2018). Low-dose, high-frequency CPR training with feedback for firefighters. International Journal of Emergency Services
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-dose, high-frequency CPR training with feedback for firefighters
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Emergency Services, ISSN 2047-0894, E-ISSN 2047-0908Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of the intervention of low-dose, high-frequency cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training with feedback for firefighters for one month.

Design/methodology/approach

The study had a quantitative approach. Data were collected through an intervention by means of simulation. The data collection consisted of a pre- and post-assessment of 38 firefighter’s CPR performance.

Findings

There was a statistically significant improvement from pre- to post-assessment regarding participants’ compression rates. Compression depth increased statistically significantly to average 2 mm too deep in the group. Recoil decreased in the group with an average of 1 mm for the better. There was a statistically significant improvement in participants’ ventilation volume from pre- to post-assessment.

Originality/value

Prehospital staff such as firefighters, police, and ambulance perform CPR under less than optimal circumstances. It is therefore of the utmost importance that these professionals are trained in the best possible way. The result of this study shows that low-dose, high-frequency CPR training with an average of six training sessions per month improves ventilation volume, compression depth, rate, and recoil. This study concludes that objective feedback during training enhances the firefighters’ CPR skills which in turn also could be applied to police and ambulance CPR training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
CPR, Emergency medical technicians, Firefighter, Objective feedback, Low-dose, High frequency
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39781 (URN)10.1108/IJES-01-2018-0001 (DOI)2-s2.0-85047663183 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-12-17
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1641-6321

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