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Publications (10 of 83) Show all publications
Bonthrone, A. F., Green, D., Morgan, A. T., Mankad, K., Clark, C. A. & Liégeois, F. J. (2024). Attention and motor profiles in children with developmental coordination disorder: A neuropsychological and neuroimaging investigation. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 66(3), 362-378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attention and motor profiles in children with developmental coordination disorder: A neuropsychological and neuroimaging investigation
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2024 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 362-378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This study aimed to (1) quantify attention and executive functioning in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), (2) assess whether some children with DCD are more likely to show attention difficulties, and (3) characterize brain correlates of motor and attention deficits.

METHOD: Fifty-three children (36 with DCD and 17 without) aged 8 to 10 years underwent T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and standardized attention and motor assessments. Parents completed questionnaires of executive functioning and symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity. We assessed regional cortical thickness and surface area, and cerebellar, callosal, and primary motor tract structure.

RESULTS: Analyses of covariance and one-sample t-tests identified impaired attention, non-motor processing speed, and executive functioning in children with DCD, yet partial Spearman's rank correlation coefficients revealed these were unrelated to one another or the type or severity of the motor deficit. Robust regression analyses revealed that cortical morphology in the posterior cingulate was associated with both gross motor skills and inattentive symptoms in children with DCD, while gross motor skills were also associated with left corticospinal tract (CST) morphology.

INTERPRETATION: Children with DCD may benefit from routine attention and hyperactivity assessments. Alterations in the posterior cingulate and CST may be linked to impaired forward modelling during movements in children with DCD. Overall, alterations in these regions may explain the high rate of non-motor impairments in children with DCD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62426 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.15745 (DOI)001061367800001 ()37667426 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85170270255 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;903249 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;903249 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;903249 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-09-12 Created: 2023-09-12 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, H., Imms, C., Ivarsson, M., Almqvist, L., Lundqvist, L.-O., King, G., . . . Granlund, M. (2023). A systematic review of longitudinal trajectories of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic review of longitudinal trajectories of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, ISSN 1056-263X, E-ISSN 1573-3580Article, review/survey (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

To review the longitudinal trajectories – and the factors influencing their development – of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Systematic review methods were employed. Searches of six databases used keywords and MeSH terms related to children with neurodevelopmental disabilities, mental health problems, and longitudinal research. After the removal of duplicates, reviewers independently screened records for inclusion, extracted data (outcomes and influencing factors), and evaluated the risk of bias. Findings were tabulated and synthesized using graphs and a narrative. Searches identified 94,662 unique records, from which 49 publications were included. The median publication year was 2015. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were the most commonly included population in retrieved studies. In almost 50% of studies, trajectories of mental health problems changed by < 10% between the first and last time point. Despite multiple studies reporting longitudinal trajectories of mental health problems, greater conceptual clarity and consideration of the measures included in research is needed, along with the inclusion of a more diverse range of populations of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Adolescents, Children, Disability, Longitudinal, Mental health, Trajectories
National Category
Pediatrics Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60425 (URN)10.1007/s10882-023-09914-8 (DOI)000989885900001 ()2-s2.0-85159692027 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;881199 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;881199 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;881199 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-05824
Available from: 2023-05-24 Created: 2023-05-24 Last updated: 2023-06-01
McGuckian, T. B., Wilson, P. H., Johnston, R. D., Rahimi-Golkhandan, S., Piek, J., Green, D., . . . Ruddock, S. (2023). Development of complex executive function over childhood: Longitudinal growth curve modeling of performance on the Groton Maze Learning Task. Child Development, 94(3), 648-658
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of complex executive function over childhood: Longitudinal growth curve modeling of performance on the Groton Maze Learning Task
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2023 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 648-658Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This longitudinal study modeled children's complex executive function (EF) development using the Groton Maze Learning Task (GMLT). Using a cohort-sequential design, 147 children (61 males, 5.5–11 years) were recruited from six multicultural primary schools in Melbourne and Perth, Australia. Race/ethnicity data were not available. Children were assessed on the GMLT at 6-month intervals over 2-years between 2010 and 2012. Growth curve models describe age-related change from 5.5 to 12.5 years old. Results showed a quadratic growth trajectory on each measure of error—that is, those that reflect visuospatial memory, executive control (or the ability to apply rules for action), and complex EF. The ability to apply rules for action, while a rate-limiting factor in complex EF, develops rapidly over early-to-mid childhood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
article, child, childhood, clinical assessment, cohort analysis, executive function, female, growth curve, human, longitudinal study, major clinical study, male, maze test, memory
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59341 (URN)10.1111/cdev.13888 (DOI)000906710700001 ()36593650 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145451948 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;852234 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;852234 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;852234 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-01-09 Created: 2023-01-09 Last updated: 2023-04-25Bibliographically approved
Jelsma, D., Abdollahipour, R., Ghadiri, F., Alaei, F., Nieto, M. P., Svoboda, Z., . . . Green, D. (2023). Evidence-based practice interventions for children and young people with Developmental Coordination Disorder - A scoping review [protocol].
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidence-based practice interventions for children and young people with Developmental Coordination Disorder - A scoping review [protocol]
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2023 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Review question / Objective: The aim of this review was to identify, qualify, evaluate and synthesise interventions used for children and young people with Developmental Coordination Disorder. The PCC was used to develop the review question: Population – children and young people with disorders of motor coordination aged to 25 years, not due to neurological disease or disorder eg. Cerebral Palsy. Concept - any method aimed to improve/treat/intervene in areas of motor learning, motor control, motor coordination or motor skill. Context - information on methods of delivery of interventions to consider context and cultural factors influencing delivery as well as details of intervention timing and outcomes. Primary Question: What interventions are being used for children and young people with DCD? Secondary Questions: How are these interventions being implemented? What outcomes are evident?

Keywords
DCD; training; treatment; contexts
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59804 (URN)10.37766/inplasy2023.2.0028 (DOI)
Note

Published on INPLASY, International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols, 7 February 2023 and updated 10 February 2023. INPLASY202320028

Available from: 2023-02-10 Created: 2023-02-10 Last updated: 2023-02-10Bibliographically approved
Fischer, E., Green, D. & Lygnegård, F. (2023). Occupation as means and ends in paediatric occupational therapy: A systematic review. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 30(8), 1181-1198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupation as means and ends in paediatric occupational therapy: A systematic review
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1181-1198Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is a lack of evidence-based knowledge in paediatric occupational therapy about the effectiveness of interventions using daily activities as a treatment modality in improving children’s participation.

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of occupation-based and occupation-focused interventions in improving participation in everyday occupations for young children with a disability.

Material and methods: A systematic review based on Joanna Briggs Institute methodology and critical appraisal tools was conducted. Six databases were searched for quantitative intervention studies aimed at improving participation in everyday occupations of young children with a disability through the use of everyday occupation.

Results: The search yielded 3732 records, of which 13 studies met inclusion criteria. Ten studies met methodological quality criteria and were included in the synthesis, five randomised controlled trials and five quasi-experimental studies, involving a total of 424 children with a mean age of 6.5 years. The studies were classified into cognitive (n = 5), context-focussed (n = 2) and playgroup interventions (n = 3). Study quality ranged from low to moderate, only one study was rated high quality.

Conclusions and significance: Occupation-based and occupation-focused interventions may have a positive effect on participation in everyday occupations for young children with a disability, but study design, risk of bias and insufficient reporting limit confidence in the body of evidence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Effectiveness, evidence, family of participation-related constructs (fPRC), impairment, neurodevelopmental disorder, participation, quantitative
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60057 (URN)10.1080/11038128.2023.2188253 (DOI)000954671200001 ()36947668 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150919909 (Scopus ID)HOA;;873444 (Local ID)HOA;;873444 (Archive number)HOA;;873444 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-04-03 Created: 2023-04-03 Last updated: 2023-12-12Bibliographically approved
Subara-Zukic, E., Cole, M. H., McGuckian, T. B., Steenbergen, B., Green, D., Smits-Engelsman, B. C., . . . Wilson, P. H. (2022). Behavioral and Neuroimaging Research on Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD): A Combined Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Recent Findings. Frontiers in Psychology, 13, Article ID 809455.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral and Neuroimaging Research on Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD): A Combined Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Recent Findings
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 809455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The neurocognitive basis of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD; or motor clumsiness) remains an issue of continued debate. This combined systematic review and meta-analysis provides a synthesis of recent experimental studies on the motor control, cognitive, and neural underpinnings of DCD.

Methods: The review included all published work conducted since September 2016 and up to April 2021. One-hundred papers with a DCD-Control comparison were included, with 1,374 effect sizes entered into a multi-level meta-analysis.

Results: The most profound deficits were shown in: voluntary gaze control during movement; cognitive-motor integration; practice-/context-dependent motor learning; internal modeling; more variable movement kinematics/kinetics; larger safety margins when locomoting, and atypical neural structure and function across sensori-motor and prefrontal regions.

Interpretation: Taken together, these results on DCD suggest fundamental deficits in visual-motor mapping and cognitive-motor integration, and abnormal maturation of motor networks, but also areas of pragmatic compensation for motor control deficits. Implications for current theory, future research, and evidence-based practice are discussed.

Systematic Review Registration: PROSPERO, identifier: CRD42020185444.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
cognitive control, Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), executive function, meta-analysis, motor learning and control, neurodevelopmental disorders, neuroimaging
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-55964 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2022.809455 (DOI)000753804700001 ()35153960 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124525413 (Scopus ID)GOA;intsam;798117 (Local ID)GOA;intsam;798117 (Archive number)GOA;intsam;798117 (OAI)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2020.0200
Available from: 2022-03-02 Created: 2022-03-02 Last updated: 2022-03-07Bibliographically approved
Knutti, K., Björklund Carlstedt, A., Clasen, R. & Green, D. (2022). Impacts of goal setting on engagement and rehabilitation outcomes following acquired brain injury: a systematic review of reviews. Disability and Rehabilitation, 44(12), 2581-2590
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impacts of goal setting on engagement and rehabilitation outcomes following acquired brain injury: a systematic review of reviews
2022 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 2581-2590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To appraise and synthesize evidence from previous systematic reviews (SRs) concerning the impacts of goal setting on engagement in the rehabilitation process and on outcomes of participation and occupational performance for individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI).

Materials and methods: Systematic review of SRs following the preferred reporting items for SRs and meta-analysis guidelines. Sixteen full text articles were assessed for eligibility, from which four were included in the review. The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklists for SRs was used to rate quality and risk of bias.

Results: Four SRs of moderate to high quality included a variety of methodologies. Evidence of moderate quality showed clients’ active participation in goal setting had positive impacts on the client and their engagement in the process. Findings suggested that goal-directed interventions, particularly in outpatient rehabilitation, may improve occupational performance. There was some indication that goal setting may support adherence to therapeutic exercises, but relevance to rehabilitation outcomes was less clear. Findings related to participation outcomes were minimal.

Conclusions: Goal setting is a complex and multidimensional process. Goal setting may contribute to improved engagement in rehabilitation although few studies explored occupational performance and participation outcomes for individuals with ABI.

Implications for rehabilitation

  • Active goal setting may contribute to improved engagement in rehabilitation, however, including individual clients in the goal setting process requires creativity and flexibility on behalf of professionals.
  • A model is presented to promote understanding of the personal and environmental barriers and facilitators that may interact with goal setting approaches to promote engagement in rehabilitation.
  • There is a need for more research exploring impact of active client-centered goal setting on occupational performance and participation outcomes for people with acquired brain injury.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Acquired brain injury;, adherence;, goal setting;, occupational performance;, participation
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-51111 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2020.1846796 (DOI)000590650200001 ()33211986 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85096341975 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;1505980 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;1505980 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;1505980 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-12-02 Created: 2020-12-02 Last updated: 2022-06-23Bibliographically approved
Fischer, E., Green, D. & Lygnegård, F. (2022). Systematic review protocol of the effectiveness of occupation-based and occupation-focused interventions used in occupational therapy to improve participation in everyday activities for young children with a disability [protocol].
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic review protocol of the effectiveness of occupation-based and occupation-focused interventions used in occupational therapy to improve participation in everyday activities for young children with a disability [protocol]
2022 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Review question / Objective: The aim of this review was to identify, appraise, evaluate and synthesise evidence of the effectiveness of interventions using occupations and/or occupational performance outcomes in improving activities of daily living and participation of young children with a disability. The PICOS framework was used to develop the review question: Population – children with a disability under the age of 10. Intervention – interventions which are both occupation-based and occupation-focused provided by an occupational therapist in groups or individually, incorporating participation in everyday occupations in the most natural context possible or focusing directly on participation in everyday occupations instead of focusing on improving underlying functions in order to better participate in everyday occupations (1)(Fisher, 2013). Control – alternative occupational therapy (OT) intervention, alternative non-OT intervention or no intervention. Outcome – improved participation in everyday occupations assessed before and after the intervention, measured by standardized assessment tools or self-report measures of occupational performance, engagement and participation. Study characteristics – Systematic Review of original studies (levels I and II, Joanna Briggs Institute) including Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) or quasiexperimental designs (eg. with Pre-test – post-test or historic/ retrospective control group study). Research Question: “What is the evidence for the effectiveness of occupation-based and occupationfocused interventions in improving participation in everyday occupations for young children with a disability?”

Keywords
disability; paediatrics; occupational therapy; intervention; participation; family of participation-related constructs (fPRC); evidence; effectiveness; systematic review
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59536 (URN)10.37766/inplasy2022.6.0117 (DOI)
Note

Published on INPLASY, International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols, 30 June 2022. INPLASY202260117

Available from: 2023-01-30 Created: 2023-01-30 Last updated: 2023-01-30Bibliographically approved
Green, D. (2022). Typology and categorization in developmental coordination disorder: Where does this leave us?. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 64(11), 1316-1317
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Typology and categorization in developmental coordination disorder: Where does this leave us?
2022 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 64, no 11, p. 1316-1317Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
National Category
Neurology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-58019 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.15326 (DOI)000815347900001 ()35751179 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85132579001 (Scopus ID)
Note

Commentary article.

Available from: 2022-07-22 Created: 2022-07-22 Last updated: 2022-10-12Bibliographically approved
Abu-Ata, A., Green, D., Sopher, R., Portnoy, S. & Ratzon, N. Z. (2022). Upper Limb Kinematics of Handwriting among Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. Sensors, 22(23), Article ID 9224.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upper Limb Kinematics of Handwriting among Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder
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2022 (English)In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 22, no 23, article id 9224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) often experience difficulties with handwriting legibility and speed. This study investigates the relationship between handwriting and upper limb kinematics to characterize movement patterns of children with DCD and typically developing (TD) children.

Methods: 30 children with and without DCD matched for age, gender, and parent education were compared across handwriting abilities using a standardized handwriting assessment of both copied and dictated tasks (A-A Handwriting). The 3D motion capture system (Qualysis) was used to analyze upper limb kinematics and characterize movement patterns during handwriting and contrasted with written output.

Results: Children with DCD wrote fewer legible letters in both copying and dictation. Children with DCD also showed poor automatization of key writing concepts. Atypical wrist postures were associated with reduced legibility for children with DCD (F (1,27) 4.71, p = 0.04, p = 0.04, p-η2  0.15); whereas for TD children, better legibility was associated with greater variations in movement speed, particularly of the wrist (rho = −0.578, p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Results reflect different movement parameters influencing handwriting in children with DCD. An improved understanding of the movement characteristics during handwriting of these children may assist intervention design.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
DCD, handwriting, legibility, 3D motion analysis, kinematics
National Category
Neurology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59008 (URN)10.3390/s22239224 (DOI)000896119600001 ()36501925 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143831367 (Scopus ID)GOA;intsam;844763 (Local ID)GOA;intsam;844763 (Archive number)GOA;intsam;844763 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-11-30 Created: 2022-11-30 Last updated: 2023-01-02Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1129-8071

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