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Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Rudisch, J., Butler, J., Izadi, H., Birtles, D. & Green, D. (2018). Developmental characteristics of disparate bimanual movement skills in typically developing children. Journal of motor behavior, 50(1), 8-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental characteristics of disparate bimanual movement skills in typically developing children
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2018 (English)In: Journal of motor behavior, ISSN 0022-2895, E-ISSN 1940-1027, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 8-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mastery of many tasks in daily life requires role differentiated bimanual hand use with high spatiotemporal cooperation and minimal interference. The authors investigated developmental changes in the performance of a disparate bimanual movement task requiring sequenced movements. Age groups were attributed to changes in CNS structures critical for bimanual control such as the corpus callosum (CC) and the prefrontal cortex; young children (5–6 years old), older children (7–9 years old), and adolescents (10–16 years old). Results show qualitative changes in spatiotemporal sequencing between the young and older children which typically marks a phase of distinct reduction of growth and myelination of the CC. Results show qualitative changes in spatiotemporal sequencing between the young and older children, which coincides with distinct changes in the growth rate and myelination of the CC. The results further support the hypothesis that CC maturation plays an important role in the development of bimanual skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
bimanual coordination, corpus callosum, kinematics, motor development, child, coordination, growth rate, human, maturation, myelination, skill
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37439 (URN)10.1080/00222895.2016.1271302 (DOI)28632103 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014510095 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved
Green, D. (2018). Prognostication and the unpredictable nature of HIV encephalopathy with bilateral lower limb spasticity. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prognostication and the unpredictable nature of HIV encephalopathy with bilateral lower limb spasticity
2018 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749Article in journal (Other academic) Accepted
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38429 (URN)
Note

Commentary

Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Green, D. (2018). The Tyneside Pegboard Test: balancing clinical utility against ecological validity. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 60(3), 224-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Tyneside Pegboard Test: balancing clinical utility against ecological validity
2018 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 224-224Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38976 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.13678 (DOI)000425629500011 ()29315525 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042223240 (Scopus ID)
Note

Commentary on the article The Tyneside Pegboard Test: development, validation, and observations in unilateral cerebral palsy by Basu et al. on pages 314–321 in the same journal issue

Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved
Weinstein, M., Green, D., Rudisch, J., Zielinski, I. M., Benthem-Muñiz, M., Jongsma, M. L. A., . . . Barker, G. J. (2018). Understanding the relationship between brain and upper limb function in children with unilateral motor impairments: A multimodal approach. European journal of paediatric neurology, 22(1), 143-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the relationship between brain and upper limb function in children with unilateral motor impairments: A multimodal approach
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2018 (English)In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 143-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Atypical brain development and early brain injury have profound and long lasting impact on the development, skill acquisition, and subsequent independence of a child. Heterogeneity is present at the brain level and at the motor level; particularly with respect to phenomena of bilateral activation and mirrored movements (MMs). In this multiple case study we consider the feasibility of using several modalities to explore the relationship between brain structure and/or activity and hand function: Electroencephalography (EEG), both structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI, fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), Electromyography (EMG) and hand function assessments.

Methods: 15 children with unilateral CP (ages: 9.4 ± 2.5 years) undertook hand function assessments and at least two additional neuroimaging and/or neurophysiological procedures: MRI/DTI/fMRI (n = 13), TMS (n = 11), and/or EEG/EMG (n = 8). During the fMRI scans and EEG measurements, a motor task was performed to study cortical motor control activity during simple hand movements. DTI tractography analysis was used to study the corpus-callosum (CC) and cortico-spinal tracts (CST). TMS was used to study cortico-spinal connectivity pattern.

Results: Type and range of severity of brain injury was evident across all levels of manual ability with the highest radiological scores corresponded to children poorer manual ability. Evidence of MMs was found in 7 children, mostly detected when moving the affected hand, and not necessarily corresponding to bilateral brain activation. When moving the affected hand, bilateral brain activation was seen in 6/11 children while 3/11 demonstrated unilateral activation in the contralateral hemisphere, and one child demonstrated motor activation predominantly in the supplementary motor area (SMA). TMS revealed three types of connectivity patterns from the cortex to the affected hand: a contralateral (n = 3), an ipsilateral (n = 4) and a mixed (n = 1) connectivity pattern; again without clear association with MMs. No differences were found between children with and without MMs in lesion scores, motor fMRI laterality indices, CST diffusivity values, and upper limb function. In the genu, midbody, and splenium of the CC, higher fractional anisotropy values were found in children with MMs compared to children without MMs. The EEG data indicated a stronger mu-restoration above the contralateral hemisphere in 6/8 children and above the ipsilateral hemisphere in 2/8 children.

Conclusion: The current results demonstrate benefits from the use of different modalities when studying upper-limb function in children with CP; not least to accommodate to the variations in tolerance and feasibility of implementation of the differing methods. These exposed multiple individual brain-reorganization patterns corresponding to different functional motor abilities. Additional research is warranted to understand the transactional influences of early brain injury, neuroplasticity and developmental and environmental factors on hand function in order to develop targeted interventions. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Cerebral palsy, EEG, Mirror movements, Motor, MRI, TMS
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38129 (URN)10.1016/j.ejpn.2017.09.012 (DOI)000424858100020 ()29111113 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032338876 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2018-03-02Bibliographically approved
Jaber, M., Farr, W., Morris, C., Bremner, S., Male, I. & Green, D. (2017). Barriers and facilitators to physical activity participation and engagement in wii-fit home-therapy programmes for children with cerebral palsy. In: : . Paper presented at 29th annual meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), May 17 - 20, 2017, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers and facilitators to physical activity participation and engagement in wii-fit home-therapy programmes for children with cerebral palsy
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38424 (URN)
Conference
29th annual meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), May 17 - 20, 2017, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Green, D. (2017). Challenges in combining upper limb and lower limb interventions in protocols for children with brain injury [Letter to the editor]. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 59(3), 335-335
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in combining upper limb and lower limb interventions in protocols for children with brain injury
2017 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 335-335Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
acquired brain injury, child, clinical protocol, comorbidity, human, Letter, limb movement, lower limb, motor performance, outcome assessment, priority journal, upper limb, video game
National Category
Neurology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37440 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.13234 (DOI)000397320200021 ()28145587 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85010951381 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Farr, W. J., Male, I., Green, D., Morris, C., Gage, H., Bailey, S., . . . Memon, A. (2017). Current issues and challenges in research on virtual reality therapy for children with neurodisability. In: W. Powell, A. Rizzo, P. M. Sharkey, & J. Merrick (Ed.), Rehabilitation: Innovations and Challenges in the Use of Virtual Reality Technologies. Paper presented at 11th International Conference in Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies, Los Angeles, California, USA, 20-22 September, 2016 (pp. 9-26). Paper presented at 11th International Conference in Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies, Los Angeles, California, USA, 20-22 September, 2016. Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Current issues and challenges in research on virtual reality therapy for children with neurodisability
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2017 (English)In: Rehabilitation: Innovations and Challenges in the Use of Virtual Reality Technologies / [ed] W. Powell, A. Rizzo, P. M. Sharkey, & J. Merrick, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2017, p. 9-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2017
Series
Disability Studies
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38418 (URN)978-1-53612-080-6 (ISBN)978-1-53612-099-8 (ISBN)
Conference
11th International Conference in Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies, Los Angeles, California, USA, 20-22 September, 2016
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Smits-Engelsman, B. C. .., Jover, M., Green, D., Ferguson, G. & Wilson, P. (2017). DCD and comorbidity in neurodevelopmental disorder: How to deal with complexity?. Human Movement Science, 53, 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DCD and comorbidity in neurodevelopmental disorder: How to deal with complexity?
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2017 (English)In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 53, p. 1-4Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
attention deficit disorder, autism, checklist, comorbidity, developmental coordination disorder, dyslexia, Editorial, environmental stress, human, learning disorder, mental disease, motor coordination, motor dysfunction, publication, questionnaire, rating scale, screening test
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37436 (URN)10.1016/j.humov.2017.02.009 (DOI)000403743200001 ()28284464 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85015690438 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Vinçon, S., Green, D., Blank, R. & Jenetzky, E. (2017). Ecological validity of the German Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency – 2nd Edition. Paper presented at 11th International Conference on Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), Toulouse, France, July 02-04, 2015. Human Movement Science, 53, 45-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecological validity of the German Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency – 2nd Edition
2017 (English)In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 53, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The diagnosis of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is based on poor motor coordination in the absence of other neurological disorders. In order to identify the presence of movement difficulties, a standardised motor assessment is recommended to determine the extent of movement problems which may contribute to deficits in daily task performance. A German version of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (German BOT-2) was recently published. This study aimed to determine the ecological validity of the German BOT-2 by considering the relationship between assessment of fundamental motor skills with the BOT-2 and performance of everyday motor activities as evaluated by parents. This study used data obtained from the German BOT-2 standardisation study (n = 1.177). Subtests were compared with theoretically corresponding tasks via parental ratings of overall fine and gross motor abilities and performance in six typical motor activities. Non-parametric Jonckheere Terpstra test was used to identify differences in ordered contrasts. Subtests reflecting ‘Strength’, ‘Running Speed and Agility’, ‘Upper-Limb Coordination’, ‘Balance’, and ‘Fine Motor Precision’ were associated with parental evaluation of gross motor skills (p < 0.001). The subtest ‘Fine Motor Integration’ significantly correlated with parental ratings of females’ fine motor skills. Parental ratings of males’ fine motor skills were associated with three further subtests. Regarding everyday motor activities, the first three fine motor BOT-2 subtests were associated with parent evaluations of drawing, writing and arts and crafts (p < 0.001). Gross motor subtests of ‘Bilateral Coordination’ and ‘Balance’ showed no relationship to bike riding or performance in sports. Subtests of ‘Upper-Limb Coordination’ and ‘Strength’ showed significant correlations with sports, ball games and cycling. The results of this study suggest that the closer the proximity in the nature of the motor skills assessed in the German BOT-2 to daily motor tasks, the stronger the relationship between the clinical test and parental report of everyday performance of their child. The body functions tested in the German BOT-2, and hypothesized to underpin certain skills, were not automatically relevant for specific activities undertaken by German children. Future research should investigate the relationships of the various BOT-2 constructs for diagnosis of DCD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
BOT-2, Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Daily activities, DCD, German, Parents, Validity, adolescent, art, Article, child, clinical assessment, comparative study, controlled study, drawing, ecological validity, female, human, male, motor activity, motor control, motor learning, motor performance, preschool child, school child, sport, task performance, writing
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37435 (URN)10.1016/j.humov.2016.10.005 (DOI)000403743200006 ()27832925 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85006312708 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Conference
11th International Conference on Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), Toulouse, France, July 02-04, 2015
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Skidmore, E., McEwen, S., Green, D., Van den Houten, J., Dawson, D. & Polatajko, H. (2017). Essential Elements and Key Features. In: D. Dawson, S. Mcewen, & H. Polatajko (Ed.), Cognitive Orientation to Daily Occupational Performance in Occupational Therapy: Using the CO-OP Approach (TM) to Enable Participation Across the Lifespan. American Occupational Therapy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Essential Elements and Key Features
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2017 (English)In: Cognitive Orientation to Daily Occupational Performance in Occupational Therapy: Using the CO-OP Approach (TM) to Enable Participation Across the Lifespan / [ed] D. Dawson, S. Mcewen, & H. Polatajko, American Occupational Therapy , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Occupational Therapy, 2017
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38422 (URN)9781569003817 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1129-8071

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