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Publications (10 of 67) Show all publications
Green, D. & Lavesson, N. (2019). Chaos theory and artificial intelligence may provide insights on disability outcomes.. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 61(10), 1120-1120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chaos theory and artificial intelligence may provide insights on disability outcomes.
2019 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 1120-1120Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46217 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.14328 (DOI)31476084 ()31476084 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071753346 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
López-Ortiz, C., Gaebler-Spira, D. J., McKeeman, S. N., McNish, R. N. & Green, D. (2019). Dance and rehabilitation in cerebral palsy: a systematic search and review. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 61(4), 393-398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dance and rehabilitation in cerebral palsy: a systematic search and review
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2019 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 393-398Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim

To conduct a review of research literature on the use of dance and movement with music (rhythmic auditory stimulation [RAS]) in the neurorehabilitation of children and adults with cerebral palsy (CP).

Method

We conducted a systematic search and quality appraisal of the research literature on dance and RAS in CP. Additionally, we linked the research outcomes to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework.

Results

Studies showed preliminary evidence of the benefits of dance and RAS on body functions, particularly balance, gait, walking, and cardiorespiratory fitness for individuals with CP. Research gaps are evident across all domains of the ICF, particularly in the participation and environment domains.

Interpretation

To facilitate translation of quantitative research outcomes to the clinical classification of the ICF, a table was constructed that links traditional areas of quantitative rehabilitation research with the ICF categories highlighting areas of research strengths and areas where increased rigor is desirable. The potential for dance and RAS to have positive impacts on body functions, emotional expression, social participation, and attitudinal change are indicated areas for consideration in future research.

What this paper adds

The potential for dance and movement to music help balance, gait, and walking in children and adults with cerebral palsy. Research gaps are evident across International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health domains, particularly participation and environment domains.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41950 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.14064 (DOI)000460344300009 ()30350851 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055500583 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Blank, R., Barnett, A. L., Cairney, J., Green, D., Kirby, A., Polatajko, H., . . . Vinçon, S. (2019). International clinical practice recommendations on the definition, diagnosis, assessment, intervention, and psychosocial aspects of developmental coordination disorder. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 61(3), 242-285
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International clinical practice recommendations on the definition, diagnosis, assessment, intervention, and psychosocial aspects of developmental coordination disorder
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2019 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 242-285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: These international clinical practice recommendations (CPR) for developmental coordination disorder (DCD), initiated by the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), aim to address key questions on the definition, diagnosis, assessment, intervention, and psychosocial aspects of DCD relevant for clinical practice.

METHOD: Key questions in five areas were considered through literature reviews and formal expert consensus. For recommendations based on evidence, literature searches on 'mechanisms', 'assessment', and 'intervention' were updated since the last recommendations in 2012. New searches were conducted for 'psychosocial issues' and 'adolescents/adults'. Evidence was rated according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (level of evidence [LOE] 1-4) and transferred into recommendations. For recommendations based on formal consensus, two meetings of an international, multidisciplinary expert panel were conducted with a further five Delphi rounds to develop good clinical practice (GCP) recommendations.

RESULTS: Thirty-five recommendations were made. Eight were based on the evidence from literature reviews (three on 'assessment', five on 'intervention'). Twenty-two were updated from the 2012 recommendations. New recommendations relate to diagnosis and assessment (two GCPs) and psychosocial issues (three GCPs). Additionally, one new recommendation (LOE) reflects active video games as adjuncts to more traditional activity-oriented and participation-oriented interventions, and two new recommendations (one GCP, one LOE) were made for adolescents and adults with DCD.

INTERPRETATION: The CPR-DCD is a comprehensive overview of DCD and current understanding based on research evidence and expert consensus. It reflects the state of the art for clinicians and scientists of varied disciplines. The international CPR-DCD may serve as a basis for national guidelines.

WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:

  • Updated international clinical practice guidelines on developmental coordination disorder (DCD).
  • Refined and extended recommendations on clinical assessment and intervention for DCD.
  • A critical synopsis of current research on mechanisms of DCD.
  • A critical synopsis of psychosocial issues in DCD, with implications for clinical practice.
  • The first international recommendations to consider adolescents and adults with DCD.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43175 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.14132 (DOI)000458292600003 ()30671947 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060528764 (Scopus ID)HOA HHJ 2019;HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HOA HHJ 2019;HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HOA HHJ 2019;HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Green, D. (2019). New international clinical recommendations on Developmental Coordination Disorders: Review and Implications for Occupational Therapy practice. In: : . Paper presented at Arbetsterapiforum, Stockholm, 2–3 april, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New international clinical recommendations on Developmental Coordination Disorders: Review and Implications for Occupational Therapy practice
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
DCD, clinical practice guidelines
National Category
Neurology Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43559 (URN)
Conference
Arbetsterapiforum, Stockholm, 2–3 april, 2019
Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Ryll, U. C., Eliasson, A.-C., Bastiaenen, C. H. G. & Green, D. (2019). To Explore the Validity of Change Scores of the Children's Hand-use Experience Questionnaire (CHEQ) in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 39(2), 168-180
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To Explore the Validity of Change Scores of the Children's Hand-use Experience Questionnaire (CHEQ) in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy
2019 (English)In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 168-180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To explore the validity of change scores of the Children's Hand-use Experience Questionnaire (CHEQ).

METHODS: Analysis of the CHEQ included 44 children (15 girls) between 6-16 years (median 9.0; IQR 8-11) with unilateral cerebral palsy, with baseline and post- (two-week intensive) intervention assessments using the Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) as external anchor for change. Hypotheses on the magnitude of expected change were formulated and correlation coefficients and effect sizes calculated. Receiver operating curve analysis was performed and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to investigate the ability of CHEQ to discriminate between improvement and non-improvement according to GAS.

RESULTS: All hypotheses about the magnitude of change were confirmed supporting longitudinal validity of CHEQ scales to measure change in the perception of bimanual performance. AUCs for the Grasp efficacy and the Time utilization were slightly below, and for the Feeling bothered slightly above the threshold. The latter one accurately discriminating between children that improved and did not improve according to the GAS.

CONCLUSIONS: Evidence was found that CHEQ scales capture change in bimanual performance but with limited accuracy for two out of three scales. The validity of CHEQ change scores needs to be further explored in a wider population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Anchor, bimanual performance, construct approach, longitudinal validity, psychometric properties, responsiveness
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41613 (URN)10.1080/01942638.2018.1438554 (DOI)000460042800006 ()29482408 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042929205 (Scopus ID);HHJCHILDIS (Local ID);HHJCHILDIS (Archive number);HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Bonthrone, A. F., Morgan, A. T., Mankad, K., Clark, C. A., Green, D. & Liegeois, F. J. (2018). Brain imaging correlates of limb and speech motor difficulties in children aged 8-10 with Developmental Coordination Disorder. In: : . Paper presented at DCD UK Research Conference, Brunel University, London 29-30 June 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brain imaging correlates of limb and speech motor difficulties in children aged 8-10 with Developmental Coordination Disorder
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42281 (URN)
Conference
DCD UK Research Conference, Brunel University, London 29-30 June 2018
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Green, D. (2018). Caring for Carers. In: : . Paper presented at Crossing Bridges, EMCPDM, Tel Aviv, Israel, 23-25 May 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring for Carers
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42286 (URN)
Conference
Crossing Bridges, EMCPDM, Tel Aviv, Israel, 23-25 May 2018
Note

Invited speaker.

Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Green, D. (2018). Designing ‘free’ spaces for children with disabilities. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 60(8), 730-730
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing ‘free’ spaces for children with disabilities
2018 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 730-730Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
cerebral palsy, child, creativity, disabled person, Editorial, freedom, heart rate, human, leisure, physical activity, priority journal, space, telemetry, wellbeing, environmental planning, exercise, handicapped child, recreation, Disabled Children, Environment Design, Humans, Play and Playthings
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41949 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.13918 (DOI)000437733500001 ()29978913 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049572172 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Rudisch, J., Butler, J., Izadi, H., Birtles, D. & Green, D. (2018). Developmental characteristics of disparate bimanual movement skills in typically developing children. Journal of motor behavior, 50(1), 8-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental characteristics of disparate bimanual movement skills in typically developing children
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2018 (English)In: Journal of motor behavior, ISSN 0022-2895, E-ISSN 1940-1027, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 8-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mastery of many tasks in daily life requires role differentiated bimanual hand use with high spatiotemporal cooperation and minimal interference. The authors investigated developmental changes in the performance of a disparate bimanual movement task requiring sequenced movements. Age groups were attributed to changes in CNS structures critical for bimanual control such as the corpus callosum (CC) and the prefrontal cortex; young children (5–6 years old), older children (7–9 years old), and adolescents (10–16 years old). Results show qualitative changes in spatiotemporal sequencing between the young and older children which typically marks a phase of distinct reduction of growth and myelination of the CC. Results show qualitative changes in spatiotemporal sequencing between the young and older children, which coincides with distinct changes in the growth rate and myelination of the CC. The results further support the hypothesis that CC maturation plays an important role in the development of bimanual skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
bimanual coordination, corpus callosum, kinematics, motor development, child, coordination, growth rate, human, maturation, myelination, skill
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37439 (URN)10.1080/00222895.2016.1271302 (DOI)000429309200003 ()28632103 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014510095 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2019-01-25Bibliographically approved
Green, D. (2018). From Body Functions to Activity Competence, Participation & Engagement. In: : . Paper presented at Crossing Bridges, EMCPDM, Tel Aviv, Israel, 23-25 May 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Body Functions to Activity Competence, Participation & Engagement
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42285 (URN)
Conference
Crossing Bridges, EMCPDM, Tel Aviv, Israel, 23-25 May 2018
Note

Invited keynote speaker.

Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1129-8071

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