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Møller Christensen, B., Bjällmark, A., Ndipen, I. M., Afram, S. S. & Bazzi, M. (2024). Barriers to radiographers' use of radiation safety principles: A qualitative perspective. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers to radiographers' use of radiation safety principles: A qualitative perspective
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, ISSN 2051-3895, E-ISSN 2051-3909Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: To minimise the risks associated with ionising radiation, it is necessary for all staff involved to employ specific techniques to reduce radiation exposure of the patient. These techniques include using compression during examinations of the pelvic region and lumbar spine, using a gonad shield, and asking women if they are pregnant. However, some staff do not use these techniques consistently. Increasing compliance requires determining why staff are non-compliant. Thus, this study aims to qualitatively investigate why radiographers do not use these techniques. Methods: This qualitative study is based on a cross-sectional electronic survey with open-ended questions. The data were analysed using an inductive qualitative content analysis with quantification of the findings. In total, 111 radiographers from 20 hospitals in Sweden participated. Results: Three categories appear related to barriers that could obstruct the radiographer from using compression, gonad shields and asking about pregnancy: patient characteristics, interaction between the patient and the radiographer and issues related to the situation and examination. Conclusions: The barriers to not using radiation protection measures varied depending on the specific measure. However, the barriers were mainly related to the patient experiencing pain, communication difficulties and cultural reasons. In addition, the lack of adequate and user-friendly equipment was seen as a barrier to applying compression and using gonad shielding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
Diagnostic imaging, patient care, radiographer, research – qualitative, standards
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63370 (URN)10.1002/jmrs.750 (DOI)001142119900001 ()38189636 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85181498129 (Scopus ID)HOA;;928304 (Local ID)HOA;;928304 (Archive number)HOA;;928304 (OAI)
Available from: 2024-01-16 Created: 2024-01-16 Last updated: 2024-01-29
Bazzi, M., Afram, S. S., Ndipen, I. M., Kåreholt, I. & Bjällmark, A. (2024). Factors affecting radiographers' use of dose-reduction measures. Journal of Radiological Protection, 44(1), Article ID 011506.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors affecting radiographers' use of dose-reduction measures
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Radiological Protection, ISSN 0952-4746, E-ISSN 1361-6498, Vol. 44, no 1, article id 011506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates radiographers' views on implementing dose-reduction measures, with a focus on verifying patient identity and pregnancy status, practising gonad shielding in men and using compression. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to radiographers working in general radiography and/or computed tomography. The questionnaire was based on factors from a framework for analysing risk and safety in clinical medicine. Ordered logistic regressions were used to analyse associations among factors and use of dose-reduction measures. In total, 466 questionnaires were distributed and 170 radiographers (36%) completed them. Clear instructions and routines, support from colleagues, knowledge and experience, a strong safety culture, managerial support and access to proper equipment influence the likelihood of using dose-reduction measures. The strongest associations were found between support from colleagues and verifying pregnancy status (OR = 5.65, P = 0.026), safety culture and use of gonad shielding (OR = 2.36, P = 0.042), and having enough time and use of compression (OR = 2.11, P = 0.003). A strong safety culture and a supportive work environment appears to be essential for the use of dose-reduction measures, and education, training and stress management can improve utilisation of dose-reduction measures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics (IOP), 2024
Keywords
gonad shield, compression, radiation protection, ALARA, shielding, patient safety
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63533 (URN)10.1088/1361-6498/ad1fde (DOI)001152115800001 ()38232402 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85183955573 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-12 Created: 2024-02-12 Last updated: 2024-02-14Bibliographically approved
Trygg, E., Bjällmark, A., Ahlander, B.-M. & Kihlberg, J. (2024). Radiographers’ confidence in handling iodine based contrast media hypersensitivity reactions. Radiography, 30(1), 21-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radiographers’ confidence in handling iodine based contrast media hypersensitivity reactions
2024 (English)In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media, which is used during computed tomography (CT) examinations, are rare. As a result, radiographers have limited experience handling those situations and may feel uncertainty and a lack of confidence. The aim of this study was to investigate radiographers' confidence in handling hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media during CT examinations.

Methods: A survey in the form of a questionnaire was conducted to gather both quantitative and qualitative data. There were 31 clinics that participated in this study, of which four were university hospitals, 17 were medium-sized hospitals and 10 were small hospitals. In total, the questionnaires were distributed to 700 radiographers. The questionnaire contained 12 questions and was distributed via email with a link to the questionnaire.

Results: Two hundred-ninety radiographers participated in the survey. 72% of the respondents answered in the middle of the four-point scale (2–3) in response to the statement “I feel confident in handling hypersensitivity reactions”. 65% answered that they did not have routines for training regularly regarding hypersensitivity reactions. Qualitative data showed that many of the respondents wished to receive education and training regularly.

Conclusions: The confidence of radiographers regarding the management of hypersensitivity reactions was deficient and most of the respondents wished they felt more confident.

Implication for practice: To increase radiographers' confidence in handling hypersensitivity reactions, it is recommended that the radiology clinics review their routines and the possibility to implement regular training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Computed tomography, Contrast media, Immediate hypersensitivity, Patient safety, Self-concept
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62799 (URN)10.1016/j.radi.2023.10.007 (DOI)001102607500001 ()37864987 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174636034 (Scopus ID)HOA;;912767 (Local ID)HOA;;912767 (Archive number)HOA;;912767 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-10-30 Created: 2023-10-30 Last updated: 2024-01-03Bibliographically approved
Marques, G. L., Hayashi, S., Bjällmark, A., Larsson, M., Riella, M., Olandoski, M., . . . Nascimento, M. M. (2021). Osteoprotegerin is a marker of cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stages 3–5. Scientific Reports, 11(1), Article ID 2473.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Osteoprotegerin is a marker of cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stages 3–5
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2021 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 2473Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Osteoprotegerin (OPG), known to regulate bone mass by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activation, might also play a role in vascular calcification. Increased circulating OPG levels in patients with CKD are associated with aortic calcification and increased mortality. We assessed the predictive role of OPG for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD stages 3–5 over a 5-year follow-up period. We evaluated the relationship between OPG and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in 145 CKD patients (stages 3–5) in a prospective observational follow-up study. Inflammation markers, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, standard echocardiography, and estimation of intima-media thickness in the common carotid artery, were assessed at baseline, and correlations with OPG levels were determined. The cutoff values for OPG were defined using ROC curves for cardiovascular mortality. Survival was assessed during follow up lasting for up to 5.5 years using Fine and Gray model. A total of 145 (89 men; age 58.9 ± 15.0 years) were followed up. The cutoff value for OPG determined using ROC was 10 pmol/L for general causes mortality and 10.08 pmol/L for CV causes mortality. Patients with higher serum OPG levels presented with higher mortality rates compared to patients with lower levels. Aalen–Johansen cumulative incidence curve analysis demonstrated significantly worse survival rates in individuals with higher baseline OPG levels for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, OPG was a marker of general and cardiovascular mortality independent of sex, age, CVD, diabetes, and CRP levels. When CKD stages were included in the multivariate analysis, OPG was an independent marker of all-cause mortality but not cardiovascular mortality. Elevated serum OPG levels were associated with higher all-cause and cardiovascular mortality risk, independent of age, CVD, diabetes, and inflammatory markers, in patients with CKD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2021
National Category
Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-51843 (URN)10.1038/s41598-021-82072-z (DOI)000616817000072 ()33510348 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85099822187 (Scopus ID)GOA;intsam;1526502 (Local ID)GOA;intsam;1526502 (Archive number)GOA;intsam;1526502 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-02-08 Created: 2021-02-08 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Møller Christensen, B., Pettersson, T. & Bjällmark, A. (2021). Radiographers’ perception on task shifting to nurses and assistant nurses within the radiography profession. Radiography, 27(2), 310-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radiographers’ perception on task shifting to nurses and assistant nurses within the radiography profession
2021 (English)In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 310-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The radiography profession is challenged by greater responsibilities and shortage of educated radiographers. Implementation of task shifting is one strategy to deal with the current situation in health care. The aim of this studiy was to evaluate radiographers’ perception of assistant nurses and nurses carrying out tasks that traditionally were undertaken within the radiography profession in a Swedish context.

Methods: An electronic questionnaire was distributed to radiographers at eleven hospitals in Sweden. The questionnaire included background questions and questions about radiographers’ perception about task shifting to nurses and assistant nurses. The respondents rated their agreement level regarding task shifting on a five-point Likert scale. Data was statistically evaluated in SPSS using Mann Whitney U test.

Results: Sixty-five radiographers participated in the study. Most radiographers responded negatively to task shifting to nurses (72%) or assistant nurses (65%). Most radiographers disagree that nurses should perform mammography screening or work within interventional radiography, while the attitude towards nurses calculating glomerular filtration rate was more positive. A majority disagree regarding assistant nurses performing conventional radiographs, informing the patient about contrast media administration or inserting peripheral intravenous catheters, while there was a positive attitude towards assistant nurses preparing patients for examinations. The attitude towards task shifting was not influenced by age, however radiographers with less working experience were more positive to task shifting in general.

Conclusion: A majority of the radiographers had a negative attitude towards task shifting to nurses and assistant nurses. The radiographers were more positive to hand over tasks related to patient care and administrative tasks than technical related tasks within the profession.

Implications for practice: Knowledge about radiographers’ perception on task shifting within the profession is essential when planning and implementing strategies for task shifting in the clinical settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Competence, Radiology nursing, Role extension, Skill mix, Work place culture, Workforce challenges
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50718 (URN)10.1016/j.radi.2020.09.002 (DOI)000640791900009 ()32958399 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85091219918 (Scopus ID)HOA;;1471609 (Local ID)HOA;;1471609 (Archive number)HOA;;1471609 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-09-29 Created: 2020-09-29 Last updated: 2022-01-20Bibliographically approved
Bjällmark, A., Bazzi, M., Karlsson, M., Krakys, E. & Kihlberg, J. (2021). Radiology departmental policy compliance with Swedish guidelines regarding post-contrast acute kidney injury for examinations with iodinated contrast media. Radiography, 27(4), 1058-1063
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radiology departmental policy compliance with Swedish guidelines regarding post-contrast acute kidney injury for examinations with iodinated contrast media
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2021 (English)In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 1058-1063Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Guidelines concerning intravenous iodinated contrast media (CM) during computed tomography (CT) examinations are important to follow to minimize the risk for post-contrast acute kidney injury (PC-AKI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the radiology departmental policy compliance with Swedish guidelines concerning PC-AKI.

METHODS: In February 2020, an electronic survey was distributed to the responsible radiographer at 41 radiology departments in all university hospitals and medium-sized hospitals in Sweden. The questions focused on routines around renal functional tests, individualized contrast administration and handling of patients with diabetes mellitus taking metformin.

RESULTS: The response rate was 83%. Seventy-six percent (n = 26) of radiology departments calculated estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from serum creatinine prior to CM administration, but only 24% (n = 8) followed the recommendation to calculate eGFR from both serum creatinine and cystatin C. For acute/inpatients, 55% (n = 18) followed the recommendation that renal functional tests should be performed within 12 h before CM administration. For elective patients, 97% (n = 33) followed the recommendation to have eGFR newer than three months which is acceptable for patients with no history of disease that may have affected renal function. Approximately 80% of the radiology departments followed the recommendation that CM dose always should be individually adjusted to patient eGFR. Seventy-six percent (n = 26) followed the recommendation to continue with metformin at eGFR ≥ 45 ml/min.

CONCLUSION: Compliance with the national guidelines was high regarding routines around renal functional tests, dose adjustment of CM and metformin discontinuation. Improvements can be made in using both cystatin C and serum creatinine for eGFR calculations as well as ensuring renal function tests within 12 h for acute/inpatients with acute disease that may affect renal function.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This study raises awareness of the importance of adhering to guidelines in healthcare. To have knowledge about the current level of compliance regarding PCI-AKI is important to maintain and develop effective clinical implementation of guidelines. The variation in practice seen in this study emphasizes the need of more effective implementation strategies to ensure adherence with best practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Acute kidney injury, Glomerular filtration rate, Metformin, Patient safety, Prevention, Renal function tests
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-54654 (URN)10.1016/j.radi.2021.04.009 (DOI)000706205800014 ()34023227 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85106374234 (Scopus ID)HOA;;766350 (Local ID)HOA;;766350 (Archive number)HOA;;766350 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-09-17 Created: 2021-09-17 Last updated: 2021-10-28Bibliographically approved
Janjic, J., Larsson, M. K. & Bjällmark, A. (2020). In-vitro sonothrombolysis using thick-shelled polymer microbubbles-a comparison with thin-shelled microbubbles. Cardiovascular Ultrasound, 18(1), Article ID 12.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In-vitro sonothrombolysis using thick-shelled polymer microbubbles-a comparison with thin-shelled microbubbles
2020 (English)In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Vascular thrombosis can be treated pharmacologically, however, serious shortcomings such as bleeding may occur. Several studies suggest that sonothrombolysis can induce lysis of the clots using ultrasound. Moreover, intravenously injected thin-shelled microbubbles (MBs) combined with ultrasound can further improve clot lysis. Thick-shelled MBs have been used for drug delivery, targeting and multimodal imaging. However, their capability to enhance sonothrombolysis is unknown. In this study, using an in-vitro set-up, the enhancement of clot lysis using ultrasound and thick-shelled MBs was investigated. Thin-shelled MBs was used for comparison. Method: The main components in the in-vitro set-up was a vessel mimicking phantom, a pressure mearing system and programmable ultrasound machine. Blood clots were injected and entrapped on a pore mesh in the vessel phantom. Four different protocols for ultrasound transmission and MB exposure (7 blood clots/protocol) were considered together with a control test were no MBs and ultrasound were used. For each protocol, ultrasound exposure of 20 min was used. The upstream pressure of the partially occluded mesh was continuously measured to assess clot burden. At the end of each protocol blood clots were removed from the phantom and the clot mass loss was computed. Results: For the thick-shelled MBs no difference in clot mass loss compared with the control tests was found. A 10% increase in the clot mass loss compared with the control tests was found when using thin-shelled MBs and low pressure/long pulses ultrasound exposure. Similarly, in terms of upstream pressure over exposure time, no differences were found when using the thick-shelled MBs, whereas thin-shelled MBs showed a 15% decrease achieved within the first 4 min of ultrasound exposure. Conclusion: No increase in clot lysis was achieved using thick-shelled MBs as demonstrated by no significant change in clot mass or upstream pressure. Although thick-shelled MBs are promising for targeting and drug delivery, they do not enhance clot lysis when considering the ultrasound sequences used in this study. On the other hand, ultrasound in combination with thin-shelled MBs can facilitate thrombolysis when applying long ultrasound pulses with low pressure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2020
Keywords
Cavitation, Contrast agent, Human blood clot, Microbubble, Sonothrombolysis, Ultrasound, contrast medium, polymer, sonovue mb, Article, blood clot, drug delivery system, drug dosage form comparison, exposure, exposure time, in vitro study, pressure
National Category
Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-49315 (URN)10.1186/s12947-020-00194-2 (DOI)000533408100001 ()2-s2.0-85084276810 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2020;HHJBiomedicinIS (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2020;HHJBiomedicinIS (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2020;HHJBiomedicinIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-06-15 Created: 2020-06-15 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Lindfors, M., Frenckner, B., Sartipy, U., Bjällmark, A. & Broomé, M. (2017). Venous Cannula Positioning in Arterial Deoxygenation During Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation-A Simulation Study and Case Report. Artificial Organs, 41(1), 75-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Venous Cannula Positioning in Arterial Deoxygenation During Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation-A Simulation Study and Case Report
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2017 (English)In: Artificial Organs, ISSN 0160-564X, E-ISSN 1525-1594, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 75-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) is indicated in reversible life-threatening circulatory failure with or without respiratory failure. Arterial desaturation in the upper body is frequently seen in patients with peripheral arterial cannulation and severe respiratory failure. The importance of venous cannula positioning was explored in a computer simulation model and a clinical case was described. A closed-loop real-time simulation model has been developed including vascular segments, the heart with valves and pericardium. ECMO was simulated with a fixed flow pump and a selection of clinically relevant venous cannulation sites. A clinical case with no tidal volumes due to pneumonia and an arterial saturation of below 60% in the right hand despite VA-ECMO flow of 4 L/min was described. The case was compared with simulation data. Changing the venous cannulation site from the inferior to the superior caval vein increased arterial saturation in the right arm from below 60% to above 80% in the patient and from 64 to 81% in the simulation model without changing ECMO flow. The patient survived, was extubated and showed no signs of hypoxic damage. We conclude that venous drainage from the superior caval vein improves upper body arterial saturation during veno-arterial ECMO as compared with drainage solely from the inferior caval vein in patients with respiratory failure. The results from the simulation model are in agreement with the clinical scenario.

Keywords
Cannulation, Differential hypoxia, Dual circulations, Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, Harlequin syndrome, Modeling, Simulation, Venoarterial
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37105 (URN)10.1111/aor.12700 (DOI)000393318500013 ()2-s2.0-84963626905 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160613

Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2017-08-31 Last updated: 2017-08-31Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, L., Larsson, M. K., Bjällmark, A. & Emmer, Å. (2016). Analysis of polyvinyl alcohol microbubbles in human blood plasma using capillary electrophoresis. Journal of Separation Science, 39(8), 1551-1558
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of polyvinyl alcohol microbubbles in human blood plasma using capillary electrophoresis
2016 (English)In: Journal of Separation Science, ISSN 1615-9306, E-ISSN 1615-9314, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1551-1558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recently, a new type of ultrasound contrast agent that consists of air-filled microbubbles stabilized with a shell of polyvinyl alcohol was developed. When superparamagnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide are incorporated in the polymer shell, a multimodal contrast agent can be obtained. The biodistribution and elimination pathways of the polyvinyl alcohol microbubbles are essential to investigate, which is limited with today's techniques. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to develop a method for qualitative and quantitative analysis of microbubbles in biological samples using capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection. The analysis parameters were optimized to a wavelength at 260 nm and pH of the background electrolyte ranging between 11.9 and 12. Studies with high-intensity ultrasonication degraded microbubbles in water showed that degraded products and intact microbubbles could be distinguished, thus it was possible to quantify the intact microbubbles solely. Analysis of human blood plasma spiked with either plain microbubbles or microbubbles with nanoparticles demonstrated that it is possible to separate them from biological components like proteins in these kinds of samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2016
Keywords
Capillary electrophoresis, Contrast agents, Human blood plasma, Polyvinyl alcohol microbubbles
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37078 (URN)10.1002/jssc.201501342 (DOI)000374773000018 ()2-s2.0-84963701455 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-05-18 Created: 2017-08-30Bibliographically approved
Maksuti, E., Widman, E., Larsson, D., Urban, M. W., Larsson, M. & Bjällmark, A. (2016). Arterial stiffness estimation by shear wave elastography: Validation in phantoms with mechanical testing. Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, 42(1), 308-321
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arterial stiffness estimation by shear wave elastography: Validation in phantoms with mechanical testing
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2016 (English)In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0301-5629, E-ISSN 1879-291X, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 308-321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor found to correlate with a wide range of cardiovascular diseases. It has been suggested that shear wave elastography (SWE) can be used to quantitatively measure local arterial shear modulus, but an accuracy assessment of the technique for arterial applications has not yet been performed. In this study, the influence of confined geometry on shear modulus estimation, by both group and phase velocity analysis, was assessed, and the accuracy of SWE in comparison with mechanical testing was measured in nine pressurized arterial phantoms. The results indicated that group velocity with an infinite medium assumption estimated shear modulus values incorrectly in comparison with mechanical testing in arterial phantoms (6.7 +/- 0.0 kPa from group velocity and 30.5 +/- 0.4 kPa from mechanical testing). To the contrary, SWE measurements based on phase velocity analysis (30.6 +/- 3.2 kPa) were in good agreement with mechanical testing, with a relative error between the two techniques of 8.8 +/- 6.0% in the shear modulus range evaluated (40-100 kPa). SWE by phase velocity analysis was validated to accurately measure stiffness in arterial phantoms.

Keywords
Accuracy, Arterial phantom, Arterial stiffness, Group velocity, Lamb waves, Mechanical testing, Phase velocity, Poly(vinyl alcohol), Shear modulus, Shear wave elastography
National Category
Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37089 (URN)10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2015.08.012 (DOI)000367733800032 ()26454623 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84957007046 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160203

Available from: 2016-02-03 Created: 2017-08-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1188-8098

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