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Zeng, Z. & Honig, B. (2017). A study of living wage effects on employees' performance-related attitudes and behaviour. Canadian Journal of the Administrative Sciences, 34(1), 19-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study of living wage effects on employees' performance-related attitudes and behaviour
2017 (English)In: Canadian Journal of the Administrative Sciences, ISSN 0825-0383, E-ISSN 1936-4490, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 19-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the surge of interest in living wage research, most studies pay little attention to the effect of living wages on employee attitudes and behaviour. We examine the differences between living wage and minimum wage workers on three attitudinal and behavioural outcomes: affective commitment, organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB), and turnover intention. We also examine the effects of training and benefits on the three outcomes. Results show that living wage workers have higher affective commitment and lower turnover intention. Training and benefits also improve workers' attitudinal and behavioural outcomes variously.

Abstract [fr]

En dépit du regain d'intérêt dans la recherche sur les salaires de subsistance, la plupart des études accordent peu d'attention à l'impact de ces salaires sur les attitudes et les comportements des employés. Dans cet article, nous examinons les différences entre les employés qui gagnent des salaires de subsistance et ceux qui gagnent des salaires minimaux, en nous basant sur trois facteurs attitudinaux et comportementaux à savoir : l'engagement affectif, le comportement citoyen organisationnel (OCB) et l'intention de renouvellement. Nous examinons également les effets de la formation et des avantages sur ses trois facteurs. Les résultats indiquent que les employés qui gagnent des salaires de subsistance ont un engagement affectif plus élevé et une intention de renouvellement plus faible. Par ailleurs, la formation et les avantages améliorent diversement les facteurs attitudinaux et comportementaux des employés.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Affective commitment, Living wage, Minimum wage, OCB, Turnover intention, Comportement citoyen organisationnel, Engagement affectif, Intention de renouvellement, OCB, Salaire de subsistance, Salaire minimal
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34371 (URN)10.1002/cjas.1375 (DOI)2-s2.0-84959522762 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-04-24Bibliographically approved
Zeng, Z. E. & Honig, B. (2016). How should entrepreneurship be taught to students with diverse experience? A set of conceptual models of entrepreneurship education. In: Jerome A. Katz , Andrew C. Corbett (Ed.), Models of start-up thinking and action: Theoretical, empirical and pedagogical approaches (pp. 237-282). Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How should entrepreneurship be taught to students with diverse experience? A set of conceptual models of entrepreneurship education
2016 (English)In: Models of start-up thinking and action: Theoretical, empirical and pedagogical approaches / [ed] Jerome A. Katz , Andrew C. Corbett, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, p. 237-282Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Entrepreneurship education has been largely treated as a pedagogical "black box." Despite the emergence of popular entrepreneurship models such as business planning, the lean startup, or business model canvas, neither theoretical nor pedagogical foundations are typically evident. This limits the accumulation of useful evidence that could inform better teaching practices. In this chapter, we develop a set of conceptual models anchored in learning theory regarding how entrepreneurship education should be taught to students. These conceptual models are built on the techniques of entrepreneurship pedagogy such as experiential education. They are developed for three groups of students: students without any, entrepreneurship experience, students with previous entrepreneurship experience, and students who are currently running their start-ups. A set of potential variables that could be used for course evaluation purposes is also included. The proposed models meet the needs of students with different levels of entrepreneurship experience. Theoretically, we demonstrate that entrepreneurship students should not be treated as a homogeneous group, as they have different levels of startup experience and different educational needs. Lecturers of entrepreneurship programs could choose the suitable model proposed in this chapter in teaching based on the characteristics of their students. The chapter provides novel insights with regard to how entrepreneurship programs should be designed for students with different levels of entrepreneurship experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
Series
Advances in Entrepreneurship, Firm Emergence and Growth, ISSN 1074-7540 ; 18
Keywords
Business planning, Entrepreneurship education, Evidence-based education, Experiential learning, Human capital, Simulation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34372 (URN)10.1108/S1074-754020160000018007 (DOI)2-s2.0-84988960816 (Scopus ID)978-1-78635-486-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2016-12-19Bibliographically approved
Honig, B. & Hopp, C. (2016). New venture planning and lean start-up activities: A longitudinal empirical study of entrepreneurial success, founder preferences and venture context. In: Jerome A. Katz , Andrew C. Corbett (Ed.), Models of start-up thinking and action: Theoretical, empirical and pedagogical approaches (pp. 75-108). Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New venture planning and lean start-up activities: A longitudinal empirical study of entrepreneurial success, founder preferences and venture context
2016 (English)In: Models of start-up thinking and action: Theoretical, empirical and pedagogical approaches / [ed] Jerome A. Katz , Andrew C. Corbett, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, p. 75-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we examine two theorized approaches to entrepreneurial activity: experiential versus prediction based strategies. We empirically assess the comparative performance of several commonly recommended approaches researching customer needs, researching the competitive landscape, writing a business plan, conceptually adapting the business plan or experimentally adapting the primary business activity. We foundthat the majority of nascent entrepreneurs began with a business plan, but only about a third adapted their plan in later stages. We also found that talking with customers and examining the competitive landscape were normative activities. Those who started a plan were more likely to create a venture, although the effects much stronger for those who changed their plan later on, as well as for those who researched customer needs. Our results show that the selection of these activities is both ubiquitous and driven by pre-start-up experience and new venture characteristics. The activities themselves do not robustly link with successful new venture foundation. Hence, pre-start-up experiences, venture characteristics, and the institutional environment are more important in explaining successful performance than recommended activities. Implications for research, practice, and pedagogy are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
Series
Advances in Entrepreneurship, Firm Emergence and Growth, ISSN 1074-7540 ; 18
Keywords
Business planning, Experimentation, New venture organizing, Prediction, PSED II
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34370 (URN)10.1108/S1074-7540201618 (DOI)2-s2.0-84988951570 (Scopus ID)978-1-78635-486-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2016-12-19Bibliographically approved
Honig, B. & Acquaah, M. (2016). Sustainable management and managing sustainability: The continued challenges of the African continent. Canadian Journal of the Administrative Sciences, 33(3), 177-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable management and managing sustainability: The continued challenges of the African continent
2016 (English)In: Canadian Journal of the Administrative Sciences, ISSN 0825-0383, E-ISSN 1936-4490, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 177-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34368 (URN)10.1002/cjas.1400 (DOI)2-s2.0-84989221594 (Scopus ID)
Note

Introduction to the special issue: Sustainable development in Africa through management theory and research

Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
McNally, J. J., Martin, B. C., Honig, B., Bergmann, H. & Piperopoulos, P. (2016). Toward rigor and parsimony: a primary validation of Kolvereid’s (1996) entrepreneurial attitudes scales. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, 28(5-6), 358-379
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward rigor and parsimony: a primary validation of Kolvereid’s (1996) entrepreneurial attitudes scales
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2016 (English)In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 28, no 5-6, p. 358-379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Questioning the validity of scholarly work is not a typical path to publication in the management field. However, although considerable scholarship assesses entrepreneurial attitudes and intentions models of behaviour, methodological weaknesses in scale development have hampered scholars’ ability to rigorously interpret and build upon their research findings. We review 20 years of research and discover that the pioneer measure of entrepreneurial attitudes as a predictor of self-employment intentions, has yet to be empirically validated. We show that construct and measurement differences, one-off modifications to existing scales and a lack of adequate justification may partially explain why studies in the entrepreneurship education domain have produced inconsistent results. We address this limitation by performing factor analytic techniques on data from two sets of English-speaking university students from two North American countries. The result is a more parsimonious and streamlined ‘mini-Kolvereid’ scale. We further demonstrate that this scale is an effective predictor of entrepreneurial intentions.

Keywords
entrepreneurship attitudes, Entrepreneurship education, entrepreneurship intentions, methods, scale validation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34369 (URN)10.1080/08985626.2016.1154985 (DOI)000382194000003 ()2-s2.0-84963830287 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Honig, B. (2015). Institutionalization of the field and its impact on both the ethics and the quality of entrepreneurship research in the coming decades. In: Rethinking Entrepreneurship: Debating Research Orientations (pp. 123-136). Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Institutionalization of the field and its impact on both the ethics and the quality of entrepreneurship research in the coming decades
2015 (English)In: Rethinking Entrepreneurship: Debating Research Orientations, Taylor & Francis, 2015, p. 123-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34373 (URN)10.4324/9781315754154 (DOI)2-s2.0-84960321105 (Scopus ID)9781317623250 (ISBN)9781138802537 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-07-06 Created: 2018-07-06 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Honig, B. & Samuelsson, M. (2015). Replication in entrepreneurship research: A further response to Delmar. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 3, 30-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Replication in entrepreneurship research: A further response to Delmar
2015 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 3, p. 30-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper continues our debate examining pertinent issues related to scholarship, in particular, whether matters related to technical rigor eclipse the importance of causality, replicability, or that of underlying statistical and methodological assumptions. We report on specific data findings to further stimulate discussion of these important matters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Business planning, Data extension, Nascent entrepreneurship, Study replication, Venture level performance
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34374 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2015.03.001 (DOI)2-s2.0-84939553600 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-06 Created: 2018-07-06 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Honig, B. & Samuelsson, M. (2014). Data replication and extension: A study of business planning and venture-level performance. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 1(1-2), 18-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Data replication and extension: A study of business planning and venture-level performance
2014 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 1, no 1-2, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We longitudinally examine outcomes of entrepreneurial business planning to assess effectiveness. Both data replication and extension are used to examine previously published research. Our sample consists of 623 nascent ventures that we follow for more than ten years - from 1998 to 2010. Our findings highlight the importance of data replication, data extension, and sample selection bias. We not only add to the debate regarding the merits or liabilities of planning, but also contribute to evaluating normative research and publication standards by reexamining past research using more comprehensive data and an extended time frame.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Business planning, Data extension, Nascent entrepreneurship, Study replication, Venture level performance
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34379 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2014.09.006 (DOI)2-s2.0-84921920529 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-06 Created: 2018-07-06 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Honig, B., Katongole, C. & Perry, M. (2014). Entrepreneurial promotion and sustainability: The community as a unit of analysis. In: D. B. Zoogah (Ed.), Advancing research methodology in the African context: Techniques, methods, and designs (pp. 167-188). Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurial promotion and sustainability: The community as a unit of analysis
2014 (English)In: Advancing research methodology in the African context: Techniques, methods, and designs / [ed] D. B. Zoogah, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014, p. 167-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose - To introduce researchers to useful techniques and methodologies that are effective in the African environment that reflect both the unique context, challenges, and opportunities of community-based research.

Methodology/approach - We argue that strategic research methods should be utilized that reflect the variation that is found environmentally and geographically. Because the field of strategy emerged in the United States followed by Europe, it lacks an adequate methodology to examine comparative underdevelopment by communities in Africa and the developing world. We provide a case study example of an action research project that highlights an effective way to introduce strategic change at the community level in an African context - a small rural town in Uganda.

Research limitations - Our example is based on a single case study in Uganda and may or may not have generalizable implications.

Originality/value - We explain the necessity and the process by which the action research takes place, longitudinally, providing a strategic solution to the problem of behavioral poverty. We introduce our process of community entrepreneurship as an alternative to strategic methods based primarily on existing organizations reflecting resource munificence. We demonstrate the importance of extensive community debate, collaborative decision making, and solidarity in supporting positive action-research outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014
Series
Research Methodology in Strategy and Management, ISSN 1479-8387
Keywords
Action research, Community research, Qualitative research, Unit of analysis
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34382 (URN)10.1108/S1479-838720140000010008 (DOI)000360640700008 ()2-s2.0-84914697712 (Scopus ID)978-1-78441-490-0 (ISBN)978-1-78441-489-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Honig, B. & Martin, B. (2014). Entrepreneurship education. In: A. Fayolle (Ed.), Handbook of research on entrepreneurship: What we know and what we need to know (pp. 127-146). Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurship education
2014 (English)In: Handbook of research on entrepreneurship: What we know and what we need to know / [ed] A. Fayolle, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 127-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014
Series
Elgar Original Reference
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34375 (URN)10.4337/9780857936929.00013 (DOI)2-s2.0-84958019534 (Scopus ID)9780857936929 (ISBN)9780857936912 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0563-0899

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