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Stahre, Johan
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Winroth, M. & Stahre, J. (2008). Dynamiska Automationsnivåer. Gjuteriet (1), 24-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamiska Automationsnivåer
2008 (Swedish)In: Gjuteriet, ISSN 0017-0682, no 1, p. 24-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Man måste veta varför man automatiserar och hur det kan bidra till konkurrensförmågan. Alltför låg automation ger till exempel låg prestanda och höga kostnader. En för hög automation leder bland annat till höga investeringskostnader och svårhanterliga produktionssystem. Ett lämpligt val av automationsnivå leder däremot till strategiska fördelar och konkurrenskraft.

Keywords
Automation, produktionssystem
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-5501 (URN)
Available from: 2008-03-24 Created: 2008-03-24 Last updated: 2015-12-30Bibliographically approved
Bruch , J., Karltun , J., Johansson , C. & Stahre, J. (2008). Towards a Methodology for the Assessment of Information Requirements in a Proactive Assembly Work Setting. In: Swedish Production Symposium, November 18-20, 2008: (pp. 311-318).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a Methodology for the Assessment of Information Requirements in a Proactive Assembly Work Setting
2008 (English)In: Swedish Production Symposium, November 18-20, 2008, 2008, p. 311-318Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Assembly work settings enabling proactive behaviour of the assembly operators are considered to be an important factor enabling customization of assembly work. As a consequence, access to necessary and essential information is a critical means to support proactive behaviour of assembly operators. In this paper we propose a methodology for assessing information requirements supporting operators’ proactive activities and decisions. The methodology is based on work domain analysis and it was used for assessing the information flow in a real assembly setting. By analysing the structure of information exchange and the hierarchical means-ends relationships a number of conclusions could be drawn. The first is that in order to consider information needed for all possible work activities, work domain analysis is a suitable approach. Additionally, proactive behaviour is related to the access to information answering why and what-questions. Furthermore, development towards more proactivity among assembly operators may necessitate decentralised decision-making. It is also concluded that in order to identify intentional constraints of an assembly system with increased proactivity, it is necessary to examine the levels of automation. Furthermore, to reach productivity gains the levels of competence must be developed so that most proactive decisions will remain on the skill- or rule-based levels.

Keywords
Work Domain Analysis, Proactive Behaviour, Information Support
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-6872 (URN)
Available from: 2008-12-04 Created: 2008-12-04 Last updated: 2008-12-19Bibliographically approved
Winroth, M., Säfsten, K. & Stahre, J. (2007). Automation strategies: Existing theory or ad hoc solutions?. International Journal of Manufacturing Technology and Management (IJMTM), 11(1), 98-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automation strategies: Existing theory or ad hoc solutions?
2007 (English)In: International Journal of Manufacturing Technology and Management (IJMTM), ISSN 1368-2148, E-ISSN 1741-5195, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 98-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Automating manufacturing systems potentially improves competitiveness. Empirical studies show that the most successful result is achieved when decisions concerning automation are linked to the manufacturing strategies and competitive priorities of the company. It is suggested that automation is regarded as a separate decision group, within the manufacturing strategy content field.

Keywords
Automation decisions, manufacturing strategies, international comparison, manufacturing system
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-2655 (URN)10.1504/07.12448 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-08-03 Created: 2007-08-03 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Dencker, K., Stahre, J., Bruch, J., Gröndahl, P., Johansson, C., Lundholm, T. & Mårtensson, L. (2007). Proactive Assembly Systems: Realizing the Potential of Human Collaboration with Automation. In: IFAC-CEA: .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proactive Assembly Systems: Realizing the Potential of Human Collaboration with Automation
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2007 (English)In: IFAC-CEA, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Manufacturing competitiveness highly depends on companies' ability to rapidly reconfigure their assembly systems. This paper introduces the concept of assembly system proactivity based on interrelated levels of human involvement in a planed way will contribute to increased system ability to proactively address predicted and unpredicted events. Correct involvement of human operators will utilize the full combined potential of human and technical capabilities, also providing cost-efficient assembly system solutions. The ProAct (project presented) will develop proactive assembly system models, evaluating proactive, feature-based solutions. Focus is on realizing the potential of semi-automated system with relevant human involvement, i.e. operators with high skills adding e.g. flexible capability and functionality.

Keywords
Assembly, Human factors, Human perception, Automation, Realization
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-4242 (URN)
Available from: 2007-10-30 Created: 2007-10-30Bibliographically approved
Winroth, M., Säfsten, K., Stahre, J., Granell, V. & Frohm, J. (2007). Strategic automation: Refinement of classical manufacturing strategy. Paper presented at 1st Swedish Production Symposium, Gothenburg 28-30 August.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategic automation: Refinement of classical manufacturing strategy
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2007 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Automated manufacturing systems are regarded as highly productive, thus improving company competitiveness. Many companies consider automation as either fully automated or entirely manual. Automation is however always a combination of automated and manual tasks. The problem is to choose the most appropriate level of automation at every occasion. Traditional manufacturing strategy theory treats automation as one subset of process technology decision category and thus the whole area has to be further developed. The authors suggest a new approach to automation that links strategy formulation to the different actions involved when changing the level of automation in manufacturing systems.

Keywords
Automation, manufacturing strategies, level of automation, process, content
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-3343 (URN)
Conference
1st Swedish Production Symposium, Gothenburg 28-30 August
Available from: 2007-09-19 Created: 2007-09-19 Last updated: 2015-12-30Bibliographically approved
Säfsten, K., Winroth, M. & Stahre, J. (2007). The content and process of automation strategies. International Journal of Production Economics, 110(1-2), 25-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The content and process of automation strategies
2007 (English)In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 110, no 1-2, p. 25-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

If automation is to support the competitiveness for a manufacturing company, strategic as well as operational issues need consideration. To best support competitiveness, decisions concerning automation should be treated as one of several decisions in a manufacturing strategy. Furthermore, to fully utilise the advantages from automation, the manufacturing strategy content and process needs refinement. In this paper improvement of the manufacturing strategy theory is suggested, mainly based on employment of human factors engineering.

Keywords
semi-automated manufacturing systems, automation strategies, manufacturing strategy, content and process
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-3072 (URN)10.1016/j.ijpe.2007.02.027 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-09-19 Created: 2007-09-19 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Winroth, M., Säfsten, K., Lindström, V., Frohm, J. & Stahre, J. (2006). Automation Strategies: Refinement of Manufacturing Strategy Content. Paper presented at the 17th Annual POMS Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automation Strategies: Refinement of Manufacturing Strategy Content
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2006 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Automated manufacturing systems are regarded as highly productive, which improves company’s competitiveness. Many companies consider automation as either fully automated or entirely manual. This is never true since there is always a combination of automated and manual tasks. The delicate issue is to choose the level of automation, LoA, which is best for the purpose. When planning and implementing automated manufacturing systems, a large number of issues need to be considered. Traditional manufacturing strategy theory however treats automation as one subset of process technology decision category. In our research we have come to the conclusion that automation decisions affect much more of the company’s operation activities. Thus, there is a need for developing the manufacturing strategy field in order to embrace relevant aspects/decisions in all of the decision categories. This paper aims at bridging the gap in traditional manufacturing strategy theory and highlights the additional decisions that are necessary in order to cover automation.

The authors suggest a decision support tool that highlights the different actions that are needed when changing the level of automation in manufacturing systems.

Keywords
Manufacturing strategy, Automation strategy, Level of automation, Manufacturing system
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-6089 (URN)
Conference
the 17th Annual POMS Conference
Available from: 2008-05-20 Created: 2008-05-20 Last updated: 2015-12-30Bibliographically approved
Winroth, M., Säfsten, K. & Stahre, J. (2006). Automation Strategies: Requirements on the Strategy Process. In: P Butala; G Hlebanja (Ed.), The morphology of innovative manufacturing systems: 9th CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems. Paper presented at the 39th CIRP International Seminar On Manufacturing Systems.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automation Strategies: Requirements on the Strategy Process
2006 (English)In: The morphology of innovative manufacturing systems: 9th CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems / [ed] P Butala; G Hlebanja, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Automation is a way to improve competitiveness. Previous studies have shown that best results of automa-tion decisions are reached if decisions are integrated in the company’s manufacturing strategy. Automation decisions comprise much more than just the very choice to automate and many aspects need to be taken into account. In this article, we describe new demands that are raised on the strategy process when automa-tion is integrated in the manufacturing strategy. Furthermore, the implementation of automation strategies calls for a number of issues to take into consideration.

Keywords
Automation strategies, manufacturing strategies, process
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-6099 (URN)9789616536097 (ISBN)
Conference
the 39th CIRP International Seminar On Manufacturing Systems
Available from: 2007-08-03 Created: 2007-08-03 Last updated: 2015-12-30Bibliographically approved
Frohm, J., Lindström, V., Winroth, M. & Stahre, J. (2006). The Industry's View on Automation in Manufacturing. In: Poster at the 9th IFAC Symposium on Automated Systems Based on Human Skill and Knowledge: .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Industry's View on Automation in Manufacturing
2006 (English)In: Poster at the 9th IFAC Symposium on Automated Systems Based on Human Skill and Knowledge, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Many manufacturing companies in Europe are presently focusing on automation as a weapon for competition on a global market. This paper focuses on industry’s view of automation. The paper presents data on advantages and disadvantages of automation, based on one pilot study and one Delphi study in two rounds.

Keywords
Automation, production
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-6098 (URN)
Available from: 2008-05-20 Created: 2008-05-20 Last updated: 2015-12-30Bibliographically approved
Winroth, M., Säfsten, K. & Stahre, J. (2005). Automation strategies: Existing theory or ad hoc solutions?. In: POM 2005 : 16th Annual Conference Proceedings of POMS: "OM frontiers: winds of change" : Chicago, April 29 - May 2, 2005 : proceedings - full length papers.. Paper presented at 16th Annual POM Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automation strategies: Existing theory or ad hoc solutions?
2005 (English)In: POM 2005 : 16th Annual Conference Proceedings of POMS: "OM frontiers: winds of change" : Chicago, April 29 - May 2, 2005 : proceedings - full length papers., 2005Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Modern manufacturing systems are often semi-automated, i.e. integrating both manual and automated operations. How, and even if, automation should be realized are often ad hoc decisions and not based on structured decision making. This paper examines three approaches to automation decisions: top-down, bottom-up, and contingency. Top management initiates a top-down approach to automation of production. On the contrary, when the decision about automation stems from e.g. the operators, a bottom-up approach is applied. We propose a third way, the contingency approach, which links decisions regarding automation to manufacturing strategies and competitive priorities of the company. Making automation decisions is one of several decision areas that emerge as a consequence of choosing a certain type of production system. The paper discusses important factors for the success of different approaches. Different approaches are illustrated with examples from Swedish manufacturing industry.

Keywords
Automation, manufacturing, strategies
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-6081 (URN)
Conference
16th Annual POM Conference
Available from: 2007-08-03 Created: 2007-08-03 Last updated: 2015-12-30Bibliographically approved
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